Clark County Obituaries: L

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La Chapelle, Mrs. Anna F.

Collins

The Winchester Sun Fri., 6-8-1984
La Rouche, Joseph A. The Winchester Sun Mon., 4-28-1980
La Trell, Frank The Winchester Sun Fri., 4-28-1950
La Trell, Mrs. Virginia The Winchester Sun Fri., 4-28-1950
La Trell, Ronald The Winchester Sun Mon., 3-13-1944
La Vaughn, Green                 AA The Winchester Sun Mon., 4-22-1918
LaBonte, Mrs. Geneva Shaw The Winchester Sun Tues., 5-25-1982
Lacefield, Chester The Winchester Sun Thur., 5-29-1913
Lacefield, Earl The Winchester Sun Mon., 12-14-1959
Lacefield, Joseph L. The Winchester Sun Wed., 2-1-1933
Lacefield, Mrs. Earl The Winchester Sun Mon., 3-13-1950
Lacefield, Mrs. Eva The Winchester Sun Fri., 5-6, 5-7-1966
Lacefield, Mrs. Margie Hall The Winchester Sun Fri., 8-25, 8-26-1967
Lacefield, Pascal P. The Winchester Sun Mon., 10-15-1984
Lacefield, Sherman Allen The Winchester Sun Wed., 8-1-1990
Lacey, Charles T. Johnston Howe is on trial at Falmouth for the murder of Charles T. Lacy. The citizens of Harrison county are there and are making an effort to prosecute. From the evidence produced thus far it seems he is guilty of murder.   Witnesses testified that Johnston Howe lured Charles Lacy, a policeman, into a dark alley and murdered him. Friday night Howe was hustled away to Covington for safe keeping. The trial will last for several days, and trouble will likely be raised, as negroes from Harrison county and other places are there for his protection.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, April 20, 1897.

 

At Falmouth Johnson Howe, colored, was acquitted of the murder of policeman Lacy at Cynthiana. A mob tried to lynch Howe at the time of the murder and he was brought to Paris for safe keeping.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, April 27, 1897

 

At Cynthiana, Thursday night, Mrs. Jas W. Lacey made a desperate attempt at suicide by cutting her throat. She has been despondent since the killing of Policeman Charles Lacey, her son, by the negro, Johnson Howe, Christmas Eve.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, June 29, 1897

Lacey, D. H. (grandmother) The Winchester Sun Thur., 12-11-1913
Lacey, Otis Shot Through The Heart

Hopkinsville, Ky., Sept. 4

Otis Lacey was shot through the heart and instantly killed by James Burrus at a church supper at Fairview. Burrus escorted Lacey’s sweetheart to the entertainment. Lacey resented this and attempted to escort her home, when a quarrel arose. Burus was arrested and placed in jail.

The Winchester Democrat Tue., Sept. 11, 1900

Lachamelle, Willie The Poisoning Case

By Whom the Poison Was Administered to Little Willie Lachamelle in Doubt said the Men of the Juries

Louisville, Ky., Nov.8.—The coroner Monday afternoon held an inquest into the death of little Willie Lachamelle, who died on October 19 under suspicious circumstances and whose body was exhumed and an analysis made of the stomach. The verdict was to the effect that the child came to his death by strychnine poisoning, but the jury could not determine by whom the poison was administered. It was found that it could not have been given on the pretzel, as was claimed, as this was given to the child ten days before he died. This practically exonerates Mrs. Minnie Schaden, a neighbor, who has been arrested as suspect of being implicated.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, November 15, 1898

Lachlin, Lucaling (?) Ordered that Henry Vandeow be appointed guardian to Daren, Elizabeth, James, Mary and Nancy Lachlin infant orphans of Lucaling Lachlin decd. with Thomas Acton and Burgess Acton security.

Order Book 10 P. 141 October 1833

Lachy, Nathan The last will and testament of Nathan Lachy dec. was produced in open court and proved according to law by the oaths of Willis R. Smith and William Brasfield witnesses thereto subscribed and ordered to be recorded and on the motion of L Lachy one of the executors therein named who made oath thereto as the law directs certificate is granted he for obtaining a probate thereof in due form giving security whereupon he together with Frances McDonnold entered into and acknowledged their bond in penalty of $2,000 conditioned as the law directs Patton D. Harrison and Thomas Lachy the executors therein named being present in court and refusing to qualify.

Order Book 10; P. 505; December Court 1839

Lackay, James E. The Sun Sentinel Thur., 3-2-1911
Lackey, Beecham M. The Winchester Sun Fri., 8-23-1912
Lackey, Charles The Winchester Sun   Fri., 1-3-1936
Lackey, J. Miller The Winchester Sun Tues., 9-4-2001
Lackey, James Inventory and appraisal of the estate of James Lackey decd. ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 10; P. 74; May Court 1832

 

Ordered that James Dawson and Joseph H. January be appointed commissioners to settle and adjust all accounts with Francis McDaniel administrator of the estate of James Lackey decd. and make report.

Order Book 10; P. 115; April Court 1833

 

Amount of sales of the estate of James Lackey deceased produced in court approved allowed and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 10; P. 169; February Court 1834

 

Ordered that Francis McDonald be appointed guardian to Robert Lackey infant orphan of James Lackey dec. giving security whereupon he together with Isaac Cunningham Jr. entered into and acknowledged their bond in the penalty of $200 conditioned according to law.

Order Book 11; P. 63; January Court 1841

 

Ordered that Francis McDonald be appointed guardian to James Lackey infant orphan of James Lackey dec. giving security whereupon he together with Isaac Cunningham Jr. entered into and acknowledged their bond in the penalty of $200 conditioned according to law.

Order Book 11; P. 63; January Court 1841

 

Ordered that Francis McDonald be appointed guardian to Nathan Lackey infant orphan of James Lackey dec. giving security whereupon he together with Isaac Cunningham Jr. entered into and acknowledged their bond in the penalty of $300 conditioned according to law.

Order Book 11; P. 64; January Court 1841

 

Inventory of the estate of James Lackey’s heirs by Francis McDonald as their guardian………….

Order Book 12; P. 119; June Court 1848

 

Francis McDonald guardian for Martha & Robert Lackey reports in open court no money or property of any kind in his hands or such……

Order Book 12; P. 384; July Court 1851

 

Receipt in full from Nathan W. Lackey to his guardian Francis McDonald was produced …….approved …….recorded.

Order Book 12; P. 582; September Court 1853

 

Receipt in full from Robert. Lackey to his guardian Francis McDonald was produced …….approved …….recorded.

Order Book 12; P. 582; September Court 1853

 

Receipt in full from the husband of Matilda Lackey to her former guardian Francis McDonald was produced …….approved …….recorded.

Order Book 12; P. 582; September Court 1853

Lackey, James Q. Jr. The Winchester Sun Thur., 11-8-1934
Lackey, John                           AA John Lackey, colored was drowned in the Waterworks lake at Richmond. He was with a party of fishermen, who, while under the influence of liquor, pushed him in for fun, and

being too drunk to swim he was drowned.

The Winchester Democrat Tuesday, July 14, 1896

Lackey, Lucy Age 1, female, she was born in Clark County, KY her parents were Robert and Elizabeth Lackey, she died in Clark County, KY, March 12, 1860 of disease of the lungs.

CCKD

Lackey, Mildred Will Book 1, Page 187

Dated: November 27, 1868

Recorded: December 15, 1868

Lackey, Mrs. Louise Redmond The Winchester Sun Wed., 5-26-2010
Lackey, Mrs. Mary The Winchester Sun Wed., 10-15-1919
Lackey, Mrs. Nannie Lee Sallee The Winchester Sun Thur., 1-29-2004
Lackey, Mrs. Virginia M. Died—Mrs. Virginia M. Lackey, who lived in Richmond, died at the residence of Dr. R. L. Coleman in Lexington Thursday. She was visiting there and was on the way to California when the summons came.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, October 29, 1895

Lackey, Nathan Amount of sales of the estate of Nathan Lackey dec. was produced in court examined allowed and ordered to be recorded. (returned by Thomas Lackey curator)

Order Book 11; P.35; October Court 1840

 

Settlement with Samuel Lackey executor of the estate of Nathan Lackey dec. was produced in court approved of allowed and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 11; P. 66; April Court 1841

Lackey, R. M. The Winchester Sun Thurs., 2-28-1918
Lackey, Sam                     AA Sam Lackey, colored, got drowned at the mouth of Four Mile last Friday. He had been working on the Asher Lumber Co.’s boom and in company with two other negroes they fastened two logs together to float to Ford and in the chute the lots pulled apart, and the other two managed to get out.   The body has not been found.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, March 26, 1895.

 

The colored man Sam Lackey, who got drowned ten days ago, has not been found yet.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, April 2, 1895.

 

FRANK LACKEY, of Lancaster, the brother of Sam Lackey, the colored man who was drowned at the Mouth of Four Mile a Few days ago, has offered a reward of $25 for the recovery of his body.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, March 26, 1895.

Lackey, Thomas Will Book 1, Page 16

Dated: December 31, 1836

Recorded: December, 1856

Lacky, infant son Last week was a funeral week with many in Madison County. The Climax announces the deaths of Infant son of Wm. Johnson, of Bybeetown, Berry Poor of Flatwoods, Miss Mollie Million, of Tates Creek, Infant son of Monroe Lacky, of Waco, John G. Taylor, for half a century a grocer of Richmond, and Wm. M. Irvine, a noted banker of that city.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, March 4, 1891

 

College Hill; Died—Feb. 19th at his residence near Waco, Berry Pore; on the 24th, infant son of Roe Lacky.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, March 11, 1891

Lacrone, Homer Cecil Died—Aug. 27th, the infant child of Bert Lacrone and wife, aged three weeks. The funeral was preached at the family residence by Rev. Richard French.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, August 31, 1894

 

Lewis Lacrone and wife, of Springfield, Ohio, were present at the funeral of their son’s infant last Tuesday.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, August 31, 1894

 

Died—Monday, Homer Cecil, infant son of F. B. Lacrone, of Ford. Burial in the cemetery, in this city; funeral services by Rev. Richard French.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, August 31, 1894

LaCross, Thomas M. Sr. The Winchester Sun Mon., 2-10-1992
Lacy, Beckham The Winchester Sun Sat., 2-23-1980
Lacy, D. B. The Winchester Sun Tues., 8-19-1913
Lacy, Edward R. The Winchester Sun Mon., 1-22-1951
Lacy, Garry Randy The Winchester Sun Fri., 6-15, 6-16-2007
Lacy, Green The Winchester Sun Sat., 2-3-1962
Lacy, J. M. The Winchester Sun Fri., 11-5-1920
Lacy, John Henry The Winchester Sun Thur., 8-1, 8-2, 8-3-1940
Lacy, Lizzie At Owensboro Thursday, Redmon Smith was sentenced to the penitentiary for sixteen years for the murder of Lizzie Lacy, a seventeen-year-old girl, who had been Smith’s sweetheart for several months.   A few weeks prior to the tragedy, the girl had been receiving attentions from another man, which so enraged Smith that he cut her throat at a dance.

The Democrat, Wednesday, August 17, 1892.

Lacy, Mrs. Mabel Frances H. The Winchester Sun Wed., 4-9-2003
Lacy, Mrs. Stella Haney The Winchester Sun Mon., 12-29, 12-30-1980
Lacy, Ron (Spec) The Winchester Sun Tues., 6-21, 6-22-2005
Lacy, W. Clay The Winchester Sun Mon., 7-10, 7-17-1922
Lacy, W. Jasper Paid It Back

School Superintendent Woodson P. Perry last week paid to the widow of W. Jasper Lacy $125, the sum contributed to the Democratic campaign fund by Mr. Lacy, who was elected to the office, but died before he took charge of it. There was no obligation or claim except a moral one, for this to be refunded, but it was generally conceded to be due Mr. Lacy’s family.—Owingsville Outlook.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, April 29, 1898

Ladd, Charles Edward Sr. The Winchester Sun Mon., 12-8-1997
Ladd, Isaac Settlement with Leonard Mills administrator of the estate of Isaac Ladd dec. returned approved and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 10; P. 202; October Court 1834

Ladd, Jacob Motion of Leonard Bill certificate is granted him for obtaining letters of administration on the estate of Jacob Ladd decd. with Charles Lindsey security.

Order Book 10; P. 113; February Court 1833

 

Order for the appraisal of the slaves if any and personal estate of Jacob Ladd decd.

Order Book 10; P. 113; February Court 1833

 

Inventory and appraisal of the estate of Jacob Ladd decd. ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 10; P. 121; May Court 1833

 

Ordered that George Fry Jr. and L.M. Taylor settle and adjust all accounts with L. Bill administrator of the estate of Jacob Ladd decd. and make report.

Order Book 10; P. 135; August Court 1833

 

Amount of the sales of the estate of Jacob Ladd decd. ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 10; P. 160; December Court 1833

Ladd, Mrs. Elvira F. Mrs. Elvira F. Ladd, aged 72, died at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. H.C.   Thompson, Friday morning after a lingering illness. The funeral will be conducted at     the family residence on North Main street by Eld. J.H. MacNeill, of the First Christian church, Saturday afternoon at 3:30, and burial in the Winchester cemetery. Following are the pall bearers: C.B. Stewart, G.W. Strother, E. Renaker, E.S. Jouett, John M. Day and Floyd Day.

The Winchester News Saturday, October 17, 1908

 

Death and Funerals

The funeral of Mrs. Elvira Ladd, who died Friday afternoon took place Saturday afternoon at three o’clock at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. H.C. Thompson, on North Main street. The services were conducted by Rev. J.H. MacNeill of the Christian church.

The Winchester News Saturday, October 17, 1908

 

Death of Mrs. Ladd

Mrs. Elvira F. Ladd died Friday of heart disease at the home of her daughter, Mrs. H.C. Thompson, on North Main Street, aged seventy-two years. The funeral was held at the family residence, Saturday afternoon, services being conducted by Eld. J.H. MacNeill, and the remains were buried in the Winchester cemetery. The following were the pall bearers: C.B. Stewart, Geo. W. Strother, E. Renaker, E.S. Jouett, John M. Day, Floyd Day. She was a good woman and a true Christian, and the sympathy of our people goes out to her only child, Mrs. Thompson.

The Winchester Democrat Tuesday, October 20, 1908

 

The following persons from a distance attended the funeral of Mrs. Elvira Ladd Saturday: Mrs. R.M. Jackson, Mrs. Lula Thompson and Mr. J.L. Phillips, of London; Mrs. Martha Kendall, of West Liberty, and Messrs. J.W. Perry and S.J. Pieratt of Mt. Sterling.

The Winchester Democrat Friday, October 23, 1908

Ladd, Tiffany Rachelle The Winchester Sun Fri., 8-29-1986
Ladd, William L. On the motion of Jacob Ladd, order for the appraisal of the slaves if any and personal estate of William Ladd decd.

Order Book 10 P. 6 October 1830

Ordered that Samuel M. Taylor be appointed commissioner to settle and adjust all accounts with Jacob Ladd administrator of the estate of William Ladd decd. and make report.

Order Book 10 P. 27 April 1831

Settlement with Jacob Ladd administrator of the estate of William L. Ladd decd. ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 10 P. 43 October 1831

Ladson, Mrs. Ada The Winchester Sun Mon., 2-13, 2-14-1967
Ladson, Ralph B. The Winchester Sun Wed., 3-13-1985
Lafayette, Harold The Winchester Sun Sat., 8-11-1934
Lafayette, Marvin The Winchester Sun Sat., 8-11-1934
Laferty, Thomas Settlement with James Brasfield administrator of the estate of Thomas Laferty dec. who was the executor of Stephen Boyle dec. was produced in court and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 10; P. 202; October Court 1834

Lafferty, Edward   (Frank) Crushed his skull

Ed. Lafferty, fireman on L & N killed by falling from train

Yesterday morning when the “Florida special” on the L & N, northbound from Atlanta to Cincinnati reached Riverside, this county, it was found that the fireman, Ed Lafferty, was missing. The train proceeded backward, a sharp lookout being kept for the body of the missing man. It was found near Shearer Station, just across the river from Ford. The injured man was unconscious but was placed in the baggage car and brought to this city. Drs. Shirley and Cole attended to him and several pieces of skull that were pressing on the brain were removed. He did not regain consciousness, however, and died shortly after. The remains were removed to Hall’s undertaking rooms and prepared for shipment. After investigation it was found that the man’s name was Edward Lafferty, whose home was a Ludlow, Ky., where his wife, to whom he had been married about a year, resided, and to which place his body was sent for burial. He was about thirty years of age and had been employed by the L & N railroad for several years, and was a valued employee. Coroner Brinegar held an inquest with a jury composed of C.T. Neil, J.S. Haggard, F.H. Jones, Riley Ragland, F.M. Fraysur and J.N. Brandenburg. The inquest elicited no new features and a verdict in accordance with the above was rendered.

The Winchester Democrat Friday, January 15, 1909

 

Ford, Ky., – Frank Lafferty, fireman on fast passenger train No. 34, running from Atlanta, Ga., to Cincinnati, was killed in No. 9 tunnel, one mile south of here. It is supposed that he was putting a fire in his engine when he lost his balance and fell out.

The Winchester Democrat Tuesday, January 19, 1909

 

Had presentiment of danger

Edw. Lafferty, the L & N fireman, who was killed near Ford a few days ago, had a presentiment of danger and had requested that he be not sent out that day. The Master Mechanic could find no substitute and refused his request and Lafferty went to his death. On such little things do frequently the issues of life and death depend.

The Winchester Democrat Friday, January 22, 1909

Lafferty, James Died suddenly

Mr. James Lafferty, who for some time has been an inmate of the County Farm, died   very suddenly Saturday afternoon, of heart disease, with which he had suffered for some time. He was in Winchester Saturday afternoon and left for the Home about four o’clock. Mr. Lafferty came to this county some years ago from Cincinnati with the late John Besuden and was employed by the latter as gardener at “Vinewood.” After Mr. Besuden’s death Lafferty still remained on the place with Henry Besuden until the latter’s death a few years ago. The funeral was held at St. Joseph’s Catholic church Sunday afternoon at four o’clock, services being conducted by Rev. W.B. Ryan, and the remains were interred in the Winchester cemetery.

The Winchester Democrat Tuesday, June 2, 1909

 

Uncle James Lafferty, with two or three others from the County Farm, went to Winchester last Saturday in a wagon. They all returned together but when they reached the gate on the pike that leads to the house, Uncle James said he preferred to walk to the house and got out of the wagon. The others drove on and shortly after Esquire and Mrs. Kissinger returning from town found Uncle James about two hundred yards from the gate lying on his face dead. The Coroner was summoned and the inquest disclosed the fact that he died of heart failure, of which he had been a sufferer for a number of years.

The Winchester Democrat Friday, June 4, 1909

Lafferty, Lucian The Winchester Sun Thur., 6-18, 6-19-1998
Lafferty, Mrs. Doris Ann The Winchester Sun Wed., 8-21-1991
Lafferty, Thomas Motion of James Brasfield ordered that Thomas R. Moore, Isaac Cunningham, and P. D. Harrison settle and adjust all accounts with said James Brasfield administrator of Thomas Lafferty decd. who was executor of Stephen Boyle decd. as far as respects said Boyles estate and make report.

Order Book 10; P. 21 ;January Court 1831

Lafferty, William Thornton The Winchester Sun Fri., 11-10-1922
Laffoon, Mrs. John A Brutal Murder.

Sunday afternoon, John Laffoon, who lived near Valley View, in Madison county, sat down with his wife and son and ate dinner. Having finished, he procured an ax and split his wife’s skull, killing her instantly. He then locked the house and told a neighbor what he had done, adding that his wife had made him mad. He then left, and although a large number of persons with blood hounds have been hunting him, he has not been found. He is said to be a very simple fellow, not very bright, but no one thought there was any harm in him.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, June 13, 1902

 

Wife Murderer Caught.

Richmond, Ky., June 16.—John Laffoon, charged with the murder of his wife, at Valley View, was caught in Estill county. He was brought to this city and placed in jail. There was considerable excitement upon the arrival of the prisoner, but no violence was offered.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, June 20, 1902

 

Murderer Caught.

John Laffoon, who killed his wife with an ax at his home near Valley View, was captured on Red Lick, Estill county, and lodged in jail at Richmond. Gov. Beckham had offered a reward of one hundred dollars for his capture. It is thought by many that he is deranged.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, June 20, 1902

 

Special Term Of Court

The special term of court which was called by Judge Benton for this week opened Monday. Among the most important cases to be tried are those of Ben Chenault colored, for the shooting of William Hall near White Hall about a month ago, and the trial of John Laffoon, the Valley View wife murderer.   This is Laffoon’s second trial.   The case resulted in a hung jury last week when tried at the regular term.

The Winchester Democrat Fri., Dec. 19, 1902

Lafley, Lone The Winchester Sun Tues. 8-18-1936
Lafon, Mrs. Florence Grubbs The Winchester Sun Tues., 5-24-1932
Lageman, Urban The Winchester Sun Sat., 5-4-1929
Lagrew, Embry D. The Winchester Sun Fri., 4-5-1991
Lagrew, Joseph The Winchester Sun Fri., 12-30-1988
Laham, Thos. Killed by a Falling Tree.

Russellville, Ky., Aug.26 – Thos. Laham, aged 20 years, was caught by a falling oak which he was cutting and crushed to the ground, his body being mashed into pulp.   He died half an hour later in great agony.

The Winchester Democrat Tuesday August 27, 1895

Lahey, Mrs. Eva Stevens The Winchester Sun Mon., 9-19-1955
Lail, Pamela Jean The Winchester Sun Tues., 4-28-1981
Laine, Carrie B. The Winchester Sun Thur., 7-7-1949, 7-3-1950
Laine, Henry G. The Winchester Sun Mon., 2-14-1972
Laine, James Alexander The Winchester Sun Thur., 7-24-2008
Laine, James Louis The Winchester Sun Mon., 4-14-1941, 4-13-1942
Laine, Lorenzo                      AA The Winchester Sun Sat., 5-9-1914
Laine, Mary Ann The Winchester Sun Fri., 4-19-1940
Laine, Mrs. Geneva A. The Winchester Sun Mon., 12-19, 12-22-1977
Laine, Mrs. Kitty Esther The Winchester Sun Mon., 3-9, 3-10-1987
Laine, Mrs. Mary The Winchester Sun Wed., 4-20-1938
Laine, Mrs. Mary Ann The Winchester Sun Fri., 4-18-1942
Laine, Mrs. Mary Ann           AA The Winchester Sun Wed., 4-19-1939
Laine, Nannie Mae                 AA The Winchester Sun, Thurs., 4-14-1921
Lainhart, Efford The Winchester Sun Wed., 7-11-2001
Lainhart, Joshua Kenton The Winchester Sun Thur., 7-21, 7-22-1988
Lainhart, Mrs. Jennifer Lyn The Winchester Sun Thur., 7-21, 7-22-1988
Lainhart, Mrs. Nellie Parrish The Winchester Sun Tues., 9-28, 9-29-2010
Lair, Benjamin F. The Winchester Sun Wed., 6-5-1918
Lair, French Gets New Trial

Frankfort, Ky., Oct. 16

The court of appeals Tuesday reversed the judgement of the Scott circuit court, which gave Church Brown a life sentence for the murder of French Lair. The evidence was purely circumstantial, and the court of appeals says in giving him a new trial that really there was not enough evidence to warrant a conviction.

Winchester Sentinel Wed., Oct. 22, 1902

Lair, James P.

James P. Lair, a prominent farmer of Harrison county, was kicked by a horse and died shortly after from his injuries.

The Democrat   Wednesday May 22, 1889

Lair, John Bourbon-Died-John Lair, aged 64 years.

The Winchester Democrat   Wed., 9-18-1889

Lair, Mrs. A. K. At Georgetown Friday, Mrs. A. K. Lair went to the wood house for some kindling wood. As she opened the door she knocked over a gun which had been placed behind it by one of the work hands. The gun was discharged by the fall and the contents entered the head of Mrs. Lair, killing her instantly.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, August 16, 1893

Lair, Redmon E. The Winchester Sun Tues., 11-20-1928
Laird, Ben The Winchester Sun, Thurs., 5-5-1921
Laird, Mrs. Lela The Winchester Sun Wed., 9-10-1913, The Winchester Democrat 9-12-1913
Lairson, Ben The Winchester Sun Wed., 11-24-1976
Lairson, Bobby Gean The Winchester Sun Tues., 5-18-1954
Lairson, Darrell Keith The Winchester Sun Sat., 11-16-1963
Lairson, Henry The Winchester Sun Tues., 7-6, 7-7-1965
Lairson, Herbert The Winchester Sun Wed., 10-26-1966
Lairson, Juanita Parr Mofford The Winchester Sun Tues., 8-28-2001
Lairson, Mrs. Annie Montgomery-Died-Near the Levee, Mrs. Annie Lairson.

The Winchester Democrat   Wed., 11-6-1889

Lairson, Mrs. Bertha Everman The Winchester Sun Wed., 3-29-1961
Lairson, Mrs. Mary Hester Abney The Winchester Sun Mon., 4-26-1965
Lairson, S. V. The Winchester Sun Mon., 2-28, 3-1-1955
Lairson, Winford W. The Winchester Sun Wed., 9-7-1977
Lairson, Woodrow Wilson The Winchester Sun Mon., 2-25-1980
Lake, Ella The Winchester Sun Tues., 11-2-1926
Lake, James Robert The Winchester Sun Fri., 2-5-1965
Lake, John Bourbon-John Lake was run over and killed by a yard engine at Paris. He was under the influence of liquor.

The Democrat, Wednesday, December 3, 1890.

Lake, Mrs. Hazel Watkins The Winchester Sun Thur., 4-22, 4-23-1993
Lake, Mrs. Martha The Winchester Sun Thur., 10-23-1924
Lake, Timothy The Winchester Sun Mon., 2-22-1915
Lake, Willis Wayne The Winchester Sun Sat., 4-23, 4-28, 4-30-2005
Lakes, David Allan The Winchester Sun Wed., 10-4-1995
Lakes, Rass The Winchester Sun Sat., 12-28-1935
Lakes, Sherman The Winchester Sun Fri., 4-15-1988
Lakes, Tom Milt The Winchester Sun Sat., 8-26-1961
Lakin, Arthur The Winchester Sun Fri., 11-11-1921
Lakin, William The Winchester Sun Mon., 3-28, 3-29-1955
Lall, Lee Bourbon—Lee Lall, brother of Jas. Lall, of Paris was killed in New Mexico by Geo. Preston. Preston had “jumped” Lall’s claim, and a difficulty arose over it in which Lall was killed.

The Semi-Weekly Sun   Friday June 12, 1889

Lallee, Harvey Two Fatal Accidents.

Middlesburg, Ky., Nov. 21.-Harvey Lallee, a youth of 15 years, was accidentally killed while hunting near Somerset. George Head, aged 20, accidentally shot and killed himself near Burnett’s Chapel.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, November 26, 1901.

Lalosh, Mingo Samuel The Winchester Sun Thur., 2-9-1989
LaMachio, Albert The Winchester Sun Wed., 4-18-1979
Lamance Mrs. Ella The Winchester Sun Wed., 8-17-1938
Lamar, Mrs. Clarinda P. The Winchester Sun Tues., 4-27-1943
Lamaster, Mrs. Jessie The Winchester Sun Tues., 1-16-1923
Lamastus, J. H. The Winchester Sun Thur., 9-16-1926
Lamb, Alice Woman Murdered In A Saloon

Middlesboro, Ky., Oct. 24

A murder occurred at “Keg House” saloon in this city. Alice Lamb was found in a room at the saloon in a dying condition, her head being nearly severed from her body. She died in a few minutes. Joe Brim and a man named Nelums were arrested.

The Winchester Democrat Fri., Oct. 30, 1903

Lamb, Arthur The Winchester Sun Wed., 7-8-1931
Lamb, Bland The Winchester Sun Mon., 3-31, 4-1-1969
Lamb, Charles The Winchester Sun Fri., 10-13-1922
Lamb, Charlie The Winchester Sun Wed., 9-11-1929
Lamb, child Little Child Burned to Death

Owensboro, Ky., Dec. 2.—The little child of Jack Lamb, residing near Curtisville, was left playing in a room alone and was burned to death. Its clothing ignited from the grate.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, December 7, 1897

Lamb, Donald Lee The Winchester Sun Wed., 3-19-1941
Lamb, George The Winchester Sun Tues., 7-23-1912
Lamb, Houston The Winchester Sun Thur., 9-28-1995
Lamb, James Louisville, Ky. – Four deaths by drowning in Louisville and vicinity began the toll of the swimming season. The dead are John Bailey, aged 35, who fell backward from skiff; Jacob S. Engle, aged 23, who fell from a roper overhanging the river; William Mendling, aged 14, who go in over his depth, and James Lamb, aged 23, who was drowned in attempting to rescue Mendling.

The Winchester Democrat Tuesday, July 5, 1910

Lamb, James C. The Winchester Sun Tues., 1-4-2005
Lamb, James Lester The Winchester Sun Wed., 4-7-1971
Lamb, James M. The Winchester Sun Wed., 5-29-1912
Lamb, John A. N. The Winchester Sun Mon., 9-12-1966
Lamb, Linville J. The Winchester Sun Thur., 4-11-1991
Lamb, Matt The Winchester Sun Fri., 10-28-1932
Lamb, Mattie Belle The Winchester Sun Thur., 6-10-1948
Lamb, Mrs. Ada The Winchester Sun Thur., 4-7, 4-8-1977
Lamb, Mrs. Betty Jane Hedges The Winchester Sun Wed., 4-6-2011
Lamb, Mrs. Margaret Ellen The Winchester Sun Thur., 8-25, 8-26-1966
Lamb, Mrs. Maymie B. The Winchester Sun Sat., 2-12, 2-14-2005
Lamb, Mrs. Mollie V. Eades The Winchester Sun Sat., 1-23-2010
Lamb, Mrs. Susan C. Guinn The Winchester Sun Sat., 6-6-2009
Lamb, Noland The Winchester Sun Wed., 3-4-1931
Lamb, William White Male, he was a widower, 74 years old, he was a farmer, Died June 14, 1924, Buried June 15, 1924.

Kentucky Vital Statistics Death Certificate Number 13433, Volume 1924.

Lamb, William White Male, he was a widower, 74 years old, he was a farmer, Died June 14, 1924, Buried June 15, 1924.

Kentucky Vital Statistics Death Certificate Number 13433, Volume 1924.

 

The Winchester Sun Mon., 6-16-1924

Lamb, William Courtney The Winchester Sun Sat., 10-28-1939
Lamberlin, Augustine DIED-At St. Joseph’s hospital, Lexington, Sunday of asthma and white swelling. Rev. Father, Augustine Lamberlin, aged about seventy-five years.   He was a naïve of Belgium and came of a prominent family. He came to this country many years ago and for several years was stationed at Maysville. He came from that point to this city in 1875 and for five years had charge of the churches at this place and Mt. Sterling. He went from here to Paris in 1880 and was Chaplain of the Visitation Convent there until failing health forced him to go to the hospital where he has been the past four years. He was a man of great natural powers and great learning. He had been a professor of languages in some of the leading colleges in Europe before he came here and lectured frequently after he came to this country. He also possessed great musical talent and was the author of many musical compositions of ability. In his young days he was a great and intimate friend of the second Napoleon. The funeral was held Wednesday at St. Paul’s church Lexington, the Requiem mass being celebrated by LT. Rev. Camillus Maes, Bishop of this diocese assisted by Father Major, of this city, and several other priests. Several of his old parishioners from here attended the funeral.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, March 29, 1895.

Lamberson, James The Winchester Sun Tues., 4-4-1922
Lamberson, James William The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-31, 11-12, 12-6, 12-7, 12-19, 12-20, 12-21, 12-22-1921
Lambert, Billy The Winchester Sun Wed., 10-29-1924
Lambert, Harry The Winchester Sun Tues., 7-16-1918
Lambert, Jake Bloody Fight With Moonshiners.

MIDDLSBORO, Ky., Dec. 22.-Information reached here which states that revenue officers and moonshiners engaged in a battle in the wilds of Knox County, and three moonshiners-Jake Lambert, “Wild Kid” Greer and an unknown man-were killed and several of their companions wounded. No revenue officers were hurt. They were ambushed, but secured shelter in the underbrush and dislodged the enemy.   The fight lasted about 15 minutes.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, December 27, 1898.

Lambert, James G. The Winchester Sun Fri., 1-22-1954
Lambert, John Gail Sr. (Jack) The Winchester Sun Mon., 12-29-2008
Lambert, Leroy Freeman Jr.

(Sonny)

The Winchester Sun Thur., 11-11, 11-12-2010
Lambert, Mrs. Barbara Jean

Compton

The Winchester Sun Fri., 10-9, 10-10-1998
Lambert, Mrs. Dorothy L. The Winchester Sun Tues., 3-8-1994
Lambert, Mrs. Nell Mae

Shropshire

The Winchester Sun Mon., 12-21-1992
Lambert, Oliver The Winchester Sun Tues., 2-16-1988
Lambert, Robert C. The Winchester Sun Sat., 10-11-1997
Lambert, Shelley The Winchester Sun Thur., 10-28-2010
Lambert, William Franklin The Winchester Sun Sat., 2-20-1943
Lambert, William Fredrick (Pop) The Winchester Sun Wed., 3-9, 3-10-2011
Lambertson, infant son The Winchester Sun Sat., 8-14-1920
Lambeth, Noah A. The Winchester Sun Sat., 8-1, 8-3-1970
Lambuth, bishop The Winchester Sun Mon., 10-10-1921
Lamkin, James Sidney The Winchester Sun Tues., 6-21-1938
Lamm, Mary DEATHS   Thursday afternoon, Mary the infant daughter of E. N. Lamm, aged eight months. Burial at the cemetery; funeral services at the grave by Rev. W. F. Taylor.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, August 5, 1891.

Lamm, Mrs. Mattie Died-At Chattanooga, Tenn., Wednesday, Mrs. Mattie Lamm, aged about 35 years. The remains were brought to this city for interment.   The funeral took place this morning at the residence of Judge M. C. Lisle, on Maple Street, by Rev. W. F. Taylor. The deceased was a daughter of Judge John C. Richardson of this county; her mother was a Miss Buckner and she was related to a number of our most influential families.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., 3-11-1892

Lamme, Mrs. Leah Died—On Friday last, near Stony Point, Mrs. Leah Lamme. Her death was caused by injuries received by falling from a chair three weeks ago. Mrs. Lamme was born near Clintonville, this county, Dec. 10, 1797, and would have been 98 years of age had she lived until December next. She was the widow of James Lamme, and died without leaving heirs.—Paris Kentuckian.

The Democrat, Wednesday, June 11, 1890

The Semi-Weekly Sun   6-11-1890

 

THE nephews and nieces of Mrs. Leah Lamme, formerly of Bourbon county, residing in Illinois and Texas have brought suit to break her will. Her estate is valued at

$ 25,000 and they only received $ 200 by the will. The bulk of the estate is left to her brother, Mr. Wells.

The Democrat, Wednesday, March 8, 1893.

Lammerson, George The Winchester Sun Mon., 11-20-1922
Lamn, Robert L. The Winchester Sun Mon., 3-15-1943
Lampert, Joseph George The Winchester Sun Tues., 1-13-1987
Lampkin, Mrs. Mary Died

Mrs. Mary Lampkin, wife of Rev. R. H. Lampkin, pastor of the Athens Christian Church, died Thursday night.

The Winchester Democrat Tue., Nov. 14, 1899

Lampton, Mrs. Ellinor Fairfax Death of Mrs. Lampton

Mrs. Ellinor Fairfax Lampton died at her home in this city Sunday night of old age. She was a daughter of Col. Isaac Miller, of Cynthiana, and was born there in 1816. While visiting relatives here she met W. H. Lampton and they were married fifty-one years ago. For twenty years or more after their marriage they lived in or near Ironton, Portsmouth and Stenbenville, Ohio, and the remainder of the time in Boyd and Carter counties this State until three or four years ago when they moved to this city. More than sixty years ago she joined the Christian church but afterwards united with the Presbyterian church, and has always lived the life of a happy, contented Christian. Her husband, aged 82 years, and three children, W. J. Lampton, Miss Nellie Lampton, and Mrs. Nannie Sympson, wife of A. H. Sympson, survive her. The funeral will be preached at ten o’clock this morning at the family residence by the Rev. H. G. Henderson and the remains will be interred in the cemetery at this place.

The Winchester Democrat Tuesday August 20, 1895

 

A. E. Lampton, of Ashland, and Col. John O. Hodges, of Lexington, attended the funeral of Mrs. W. H. Lampton Tuesday.

The Winchester Democrat Friday August 23, 1895

Lampton, R. W. At Ashland R. W. Lampton, aged 73, died suddenly from falling down stairs. Paralysis is supposed to have been the cause. He was a brother of W. H Lampton, of this city and was a native of this county.

The Democrat, Friday, December 25, 1891.

Lampton, William Henry Death of W. H. Lampton.

William Henry Lampton, the oldest native resident of Winchester, died at his home in this city Monday night of grippe, aged eighty-six years.

He was the son of Squire James Lampton, who was one of a family of seventeen sons and seven daughters and who more than a hundred years ago was an inmate at the fort at Bryan Station. His mother was Susan Rion, a member of the large family of that who formerly resided in this county. Squire Lampton and wife raised three sons, John, Robert and William, and two daughters, Anne and Polly, the latter was the wife of Jesse Riley, who formerly was in business in this city, and Anne married Mr. Womack, of Carter county, and died several years ago. His brothers, John and Robert were better known in this section than himself.

About 1826, Squire Lampton and family moved from this city to Carter county and before he attained his majority, W. H. Lampton entered the iron business at the old Hopewell Furnace on Little Sandy river. At the age of twenty-four he went to Union Furnace in Lawrence county, Ohio, with David Sinton, of Cincinnati and Thomas Means, of Hanging Rock. The firm of Sinton, Means & Lampton was long one of the most prominent in the iron business in the Ohio valley. Sinton is still living, nearly ninety years old at Cincinnati and is worth several million dollars. Means died several years ago and left an estate of several millions.

For about twenty years Mr. Lampton remained as partner and manager with this firm, but in 1856 he returned to Kentucky where he took charge of the financial management of Star Furnace in Carter county. About this time he built at Catlettsburg the finest home in Eastern Kentucky. His health failed shortly after and he went to the country and purchased and interest in Pennsylvania Furnace, in Greenup county. Here he remained until the close of the war, when he organized the first “boom” in mineral lands in Kentucky or the South and sold out to an Eastern syndicate.

He then removed to Portsmouth, Ohio, and engaged in the banking business, but became involved in the affairs of Star Furnace and returned to Kentucky. In 1873 he sold out to the Norton Iron Works at Ashland and retired permanently from the iron business.

For a while he was in the newspaper business and conducted the Ashland Review, a weekly paper started by his son, J. W. Lampton.

He soon removed to Steubenville, Ohio, where he remained for several years and then returned to Winchester, the place of his birth, after an absence of more than sixty years.

In 1845 he married Miss Ellinor Fairfax Miller, daughter of Col. Isaac Miller, of Cynthiana, whom he first met here during a visit she made to her cousin, Washington Miller, father of Dr. Wash. Miller. She lived to be eighty years old and for more than half a century was indeed a helpmate and companion to Mr. Lampton. She died three years ago in this city. She was the last of her family and he was the last of his.

The Lampton family is an old English one, and it is said that John George Lampton, the present Earl of Durham, is of the same stock.

Three children live to mourn the death of their father, Mrs. A. H. Sympson and Miss Nellie Lampton, of this city, and W. J. Lampton, the well known journalist of new York.

At one time the deceased was quite wealthy, having made a fortune in the iron business, but he lost the greater portion of it in later ventures.

Although singularly free from many of the commoner vices of life, he was not a professor of religion until late in life when he joined the Presbyterian Church.

He was a jolly and good natured man, taking life philosophically and had many friends.

The funeral services were held Wednesday at the family residence by Rev. B. B. Baily and the remains were buried in the Winchester cemetery.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, January 20, 1899

 

Mrs. Sue Price, of Frankfort, attended the funeral of her Uncle, W. H. Lampton, Wednesday.

The Winchester Democrat Fri., Jan. 20, 1899

 

Demise of W. H. Lampton

Winchester, Ky. Jan. 19

W. H. Lampton, who is dead here, was a first cousin of Mark Twain, and father of Lampton, the New York humorist.   He built the first iron furnace in Ohio.

The Winchester Democrat Thurs., Jan. 24, 1899

Lampton, William James The Winchester Sun Wed., 5-30, 5-31, 6-1, 6-4-1917
Lancaster, Andrew M. Killed By A Falling Limb

Smith’s Grove, Ky., March 21

Andrew M. Lancaster was killed by a falling limb while clearing new ground near his home, six miles north of here. He was alone in the timber, and when found he was lying beneath the limb dead.

The Winchester Democrat Fri., March 23, 1906

Lancaster, Edwin D. The Winchester Sun Wed., 3-12-1975
Lancaster, George L. The Winchester Sun Wed., 4-3-1974
Lancaster, Howard The Winchester Sun Tues., 9-6-1921
Lancaster, J. W. Will Probably Die

J. W. Lancaster, who was so badly hurt in a runaway accident at Oil Springs Saturday is in a Lexington hospital and is in a very critical condition with chances against his recovery. His skull was trephined and a clot of blood, as large as a tea cup, was taken from the brain. The operation was a success from a surgical standpoint but failed to give the expected relief. His wife was badly hurt but her condition is not thought to be dangerous.

Later-Mr. Lancaster died Wednesday without having recovered consciousness.

The Winchester Democrat Fri., June 29, 1906

Lancaster, James B. The Winchester Sun Tues., 7-9, 7-10-1963
Lancaster, Joe Bernard The Winchester Sun Mon., 6-25-1934
Lancaster, John L. The Winchester Sun Fri., 9-4-1914
Lancaster, M. P. Died—M. P. Lancaster, one of Lexington’s oldest and wealthiest merchants, dropped dead Friday at his home.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, March 5, 1895

Lancaster, Milton Paid J.R. Owens $8.00 for coffin for Milton Lancaster.

Order Book 17, Page 354, 355, 356, 358, October Court 1875

Clark County Courthouse Archives

Lancaster, Mrs. Fannie Bandy The Winchester Sun Mon., 7-20-1964
Lancaster, Mrs. Gladys Marie

Maye

The Winchester Sun Wed., 3-26-1997
Lancaster, Mrs. Lulu Death Of Mrs. Lancaster

Mrs. Lulu Lancaster died at her home in Lexington Friday afternoon as a result of the accident which happened near Oil Springs, this county, a few weeks ago, and from which her husband, J. W. Lancaster, died a few days later.

The Winchester Democrat Tue., Aug. 7, 1906

Lancaster, Mrs. Mary The Winchester Sun Thur., 5-7-1931
Lancaster, Mrs. Nannie Died In Scott County

Died, of childbirth, June 7th, Mrs. Nannie Lancaster, wife of Ellis Lancaster, aged 29 years. Deceased was a daughter of Mr. John Groves, of Clark county, for many years a resident of this county. Funeral services conducted by Elder Hill, assisted by Dr. Ford, were held Saturday at the Christian Church and burial at Masonic cemetery.

Georgetown Times

The Winchester Democrat Fri., June 15, 1906

Lancaster, Mrs. Sudie The Winchester Sun Wed., 10-15, 10-16-1919
Lancaster, Tom The Winchester Sun Wed., 11-24-1937
Lanckart, Earl W. The Winchester Sun Thur., 4-21-1938
Land, B. Killings Near Lancaster.

James Rogers Kills Brother-in-Law and Fountain Land His Stepson.

Lancaster, Ky., June 23.—Sunday afternoon at Harmon’s Lick school house, nine miles east of here, James Rogers shot and instantly killed his brother-in-law, Bud Ledford. Rogers states that Ledford drew a knife on him and advanced over a remark made by him, Rogers. Ledford is survived by a widow and four small children. Rogers came to this city late Sunday evening and gave himself up to the officers.

Fountain Land shot and killed his stepson, B. Land, Sunday with a pistol. The younger Land was under the influence of liquor and had been trying all day to provoke a difficulty with his stepfather. It culminated in the killing of young Land, who was advancing on his stepfather with an uplifted ax, when he was killed. The dead man was about 35 years old and single. He bore the reputation of being quarrelsome. Fountain Land is a farmer and a good citizen. The killing occurred in Madison, just across the line from this city.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, June 26, 1903

Land, Jim The Winchester Sun Fri., 4-4-1913
Land, Jimmie The Winchester Sun Thur., 8-23-1923
Land, Joe H. The Winchester Sun Mon., 7-24-1939
Land, John The Winchester Sun Sat., 8-17-1935
Land, Mrs. Eva B. The Winchester Sun Fri., 12-17, 12-18-1993
Land, Mrs. Isabel Dinelli The Winchester Sun Fri., 4-27-1973
Land, Mrs. Martha The Winchester Sun Mon., 5-15-1939
Land, Mrs. Mary Ann A Foul Murder

A press dispatch from Richmond says news of a dastardly crime at Miller’s Creek in Estill county has reached there. Mrs Mary Ann Land, aged 70 was seated on the porch of her home reading the Bible. Hearing a noise she looked up and saw a man approaching with a gun.   Being alone, she got up to go into the house, when the stranger fired, the ball passing through her chest, inflicting a fatal wound. The assailant has not been discovered. It is supposed he was after the money Mrs. Land is known to have about the house.

The Winchester Democrat Fri., Oct. 6, 1899

Land, Mrs. Nancy Gullette The Winchester Sun Fri., 8-17-1951
Land, Mrs. Sarah Jane The Winchester Sun Thur., 3-16-1922
Land, Robert Freeman Farris, who was recently condemned to death in the Garrard Circuit Court for the murder of Robert Land, has had a new trial granted him by the Court of Appeals.   Mark Twain tells us of a fellow in the far West who, tasting some mineral water found there, remarked that he didn’t like it because it was “too dam technical.” The Court of Appeals is getting to be very much like that water.

Lebanon Standard

Semi Weekly Sun     Fri., 12-27-1878

Land, Robert The Winchester Sun Mon., 10-27-1947
Land, Sherman The Winchester Sun Wed., 9-27-1922
Land, Tom The Winchester Sun Mon., 6-3-1932
Landenberg, Mrs. Christian At Clay, Ky., Mrs. Christian Landenberg lighted her pipe and in some way inhaled the flame from the torch. She was burned internally and died in a few hours.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, April 6, 1897

Lander, C. W. The Winchester Sun Sat., 10-20-1928
Lander, Henry THE WAR OF 1812 – Private

The Roll of Two Companies Raised in Clark County by Capt. James Sympson

Capt. James Sympson’s Company of Kentucky Mounted Volunteers, August 25th 1813.

The Semi-Weekly Sun     Fri., 2-21-1879

Lander, J. Frank Died

J. Frank Lander died at his home near Helena, Mason county, Monday, of old age, being eighty-four years old. He was a brother of Mrs. Elizabeth Scott, of this city, and Mrs. Fannie Skinner, of the county.

The Winchester Democrat Tue., Oct. 29, 1901

Lander, John THE WAR OF 1812 – Private

The Roll of Two Companies Raised in Clark County by Capt. James Sympson

Capt. James Sympson’s Company of Kentucky Mounted Volunteers, August 25th 1813.

The Semi-Weekly Sun     Fri., 2-21-1879

Lander, Mary Mary Lander, a ten-year-old girl, was fatally burned at Hopkinsville Friday.

The Democrat, Wednesday, January 20, 1892.

Lander, Mrs. Pauline J. The Winchester Sun Thur., 2-26-1914
Lander, Stephen Breckinridge The Winchester Sun Fri., 11-29, 11-30-1946
Lander, Thos. THE WAR OF 1812 – Private

The Roll of Two Companies Raised in Clark County by Capt. James Sympson.

Company of Mounted Kentucky Volunteers under the Command of Capt. James Sympson. Left Winchester September 15th, 1814, and arrived at Urbana, Ohio on the 20th.

The Semi-Weekly Sun     Fri., 2-21-1879

Lander, William CITY, COUNTY, STATE-WILLIAM LANDER, of Fleming county, went to milk Saturday morning, fell into an epilectic fit and frose to death.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, January 1, 1895.

Landers, Margaret The Winchester Sun Mon., 12-31-2001
Landers, Mrs. Anna Ruth The Winchester Sun Fri., 9-20-1974
Landers, Mrs. Thomas The Winchester Sun Tues., 1-2-1923
Landers, W. J. IN the Federal Court at Frankfort last week two suits from Lexington against railroads for damages were settled.   The first was that of Mrs. Docia Landers for the killing of her husband, W. J. Landers. She compromised at $ 2,000, the railroad paying the costs. Thos. Aubrey, a nine-year-old boy whose foot was cut off by the train got a verdict for $ 3,000, but the case will be appealed.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, June 25, 1895.

Landers, Wiley Wiley Landers, the father of 19 children, was killed by an engine at Harrodsburg.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, December 10, 1895

Landesberg, Mrs. Henry Death of Mrs. Henry Landsberg.

Mrs. Landesberg, wife of Mr. Henry Landesberg, of new Brunswick, New Jersey, died Tuesday evening at the home of her mother in Cincinnati. Coming on a visit to her mother, Mrs. Landsberg caught cold, which developed into grippe, resulting in her death. Mrs. Landesberg was in Winchester only a few weeks ago on a visit to the family of Mr. T. Landsberg, and her death will come as shock to her many friends in this city.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, March 21, 1902

Landford, Daniel Two Drowned In A Freshet

Boston, Ky., Aug. 31

Miss Rosa Jenkins , of Louisville, and Daniel Langsford, both of whom were visiting near here, were drowned Sunday night while trying to cross Beech Fork River at Cox’s ford, in a freshet.

The Winchester Democrat Tue., Sept., 5, 1899

Landford, Durrett Order that Dillard Collins, David Hampton, Whitson George, Lewis Grigsby settle and adjust the accounts of the administration of Durrett Landford decd. and make report to the court.

Order Book 4; P. 111; May Court 1806

 

Inventory and appraisal of estate of Durrett Landford decd. produced approved and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 4; P. 181; August Court 1806

 

Account of the sale of the estate of Durrett Landford to be recorded.

Order Book 4; P. 181; August Court 1806

 

Easter Rollings widow of Durrett Landford present in court claims her right of dower in and to the estate of her late husband it is ordered that David Hampton, Lever Grigsby, Willard Collins and Chelton George do appraise her dower and her deceased husbands estate and report to the court.

Order Book 4; P. 135; August Court 1806

 

Ordered that Thomas Rollings be appointed guardian to Bevrell Landford infant orphan of Durrett Landford decd. with Jeremiah Bush and John Rollings security.

Order Book 4; P. 472; August Court 1811

 

Motion of Thomas Rollings ordered that David Hampton, Lewis Grisgby, Whitson George and John Hockaday be appointed commissioners to settle the estate of Durrett Landford decd. and make report.

Order Book 4; P. 473; August Court 1811

 

Easter Rollings late widow of Durrett Landford now present in court claims her right of dower to the estate of her late husband Durrett Landford. Therefore it is ordered that David Hampton, Lewis Grigsby, John Hockaday, and Whitson George do lay off and assign her dower to both real and personal and make report.

Order Book 4; P. 491; December Court 1811

 

Settlement with the administrator of Durrett Landford decd. ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 4; P. 496; January Court 1812

 

Allottment of the dower of Easter Rollings late Easter Landford ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 4; P. 496; January Court 1812

Landis, David B. Bank President Landis Murdered

Lancaster, Pa., April 8.—David B. Landis, president of the Conestoga National Bank and one of the leading citizens of this city, was shot and killed Thursday morning by Ralph W. Wireback, who is extensively known throughout the county as a maker of a patent medicine bearing his name.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, April 12, 1898

Landrum , Samuel L. The Winchester Sun Tue., 6-15-1915
Landrum, Ashley Janel The Winchester Sun Fri., 11-29-1985
Landrum, E. Paul The Winchester Sun Tues., 4-17-1956
Landrum, James On motion of Reubin S. Landrum who made ooath thereto as the law directs certificate is granted him for obtaining letters of administration on the estate of James Landrum dec. giving security whereupon he together with Wallis Holliday entered into and acknowledged their bond in penalty of $1000 conditioned as the law directs, the widow waiving all rights of administration by letter produced to the court.

Order Book 10; P. 326 & 327; December Court 1836

 

Ordered that James Holliday, James Nelson, B. R. Waller and Richard Shelby or any 3 of them being first sworn do appraise in current money the slaves if any and personal estate of James Landrum dec. and make report thereof to the court.

Order Book 10; P. 327; December Court 1836

 

Inventory and appraisement of the estate of James Landrum dec. was produced in court examined allowed and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 10; P. 403; April Court 1838

 

Amount of sales of the estate of James Landrum dec. was produced in court examined allowed and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 10; P. 403; April Court 1838

Landrum, K. W. K. W. Landrum died in Breathitt county, recently, aged 90 years. He was a native of Clark and a brother of S. H. Landrum, of Hedges. He was a minister of the Methodist church.

The Democrat, Wednesday, December 30, 1891.

Landrum, man The Winchester Sun Wed., 1-19-1916
Landrum, Marion Died

A telegram was received Tuesday by A. C. Piersall from Burton, Kan., announcing the death of Marion Landrum.   The deceased had just attained his majority and was well and favorable known here, where he formerly attended Kentucky Weslyan College. At the time of his death he was a telegraph operator. He was a young man of splendid character, and his death will be much regretted.

The Winchester Democrat Fri., July 4, 1899

Landrum, Mize The Winchester Sun Mon., 8-19, 8-20-1963
Landrum, Mrs. Ben F. Death Of Mrs. Judge Landrum

Calhoun, Ky., Nov. 25

Mrs. Ben F. Landrum died at 3 o’clock Sunday morning after several days illness of pneumonia. She was the wife of Judge B. F. Landrum, 12 years county judge of McClean county and now serving as deputy sheriff. The burial took place here Monday.

The Winchester Democrat Fri., Nov. 28, 1902

Landrum, Mrs. Blanche Haddix The Winchester Sun Wed., 8-10-2011
Landrum, Mrs. Isabelle White The Winchester Sun Tues., 6-29, 6-30, 7-1-1982
Landrum, Mrs. Mary The Winchester Sun Fri., 11-7-1913
Landrum, Mrs. Serena Belle

Combs

The Winchester Sun Mon., 1-27, 1-28-1975
Landrum, Reuben It being suggested to this court that Reuben Landrum late of Clarke county has died since the last term of this court having first duly made an open ___ his last will and testament within the ____ of his sons Washington Landrum and William Landrum or one of this ____ it is now the motion of William Ware, Richard Ware, James Ware, Martha Ware, Andrew Ware infant grandchildren and heirs of said Reuben Landrum ____ Samuel Ware their father who produced this motion on their behalf as their next friend that said Washington Landrum and William Landrum be summoned to appear before this court…..

Order Book 12; P. 116; June Court 1848

 

The last will and testament of Reuben Landrum deceased was produced in court and proven according to law by the oaths of Nelson Strode and William L. Rash ……….

Order Book 12; P. 138; August Court 1848

 

On the motion of William B. Landrum the executor named in the last will and testament of Reuben Landrum dec……….R. W. Landrum, William Raney and Stephen H. Landrum security………

Order Book 12; P. 138; August Court 1848

 

Ordered that Nelson Strode, William L. Rash, Isaac Wills and Payton Adams or any three of them after being first sworn do appraise ………the estate of Reuben Landrum dec…………………….

Order Book 12; P. 138; August Court 1848

 

Inventory of the estate of Reuben Landrum dec was produced in court……..

Order Book 12; P. 145; October Court 1848

 

Sale bill of the estate of Reuben Landrum dec. was produced in court……….

Order Book 12; P. 173; December Court 1848

 

Settlement with the Exec. of Reuben Landrum dec. was produced … filed …..

Order Book 12; P. 458; April Court 1852

……again produced …..approved ….recorded.

Order Book 12; P. 463; May Court 1852

Landrum, Robert Blake The Winchester Sun Mon., 8-6, 8-7-1990
Landrum, Samuel Settlement with Reuben Landrum administrator of Samuel Landrum was produced in court approved of and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 10; P. 421; July Court 1838

Landrum, Stephen H. At his home, near Schollsville, Sunday, Stephen Landrum, aged 71 years. Burial at the family graveyard and funeral by Rev. Wm. Rupard.   His death was due principally to kidney trouble, but a carbuncle was the immediate cause. Mr. Landrum was one of the most prominent citizens in that section, owning more than a thousand acres of land, and being the senior member of the firm of Landrum & Ware.   He was a brother to Rev. Wm. Landrum who died a number of years ago and who was one of the most noted Methodist preachers in this section of the State.

The Democrat, Wednesday, August 24, 1892.

 

In the County Court, W. C. Landrum was appointed curator of the estate of the late

Stephen Landrum.

The Democrat, Wednesday, September 21, 1892.

 

J. A. Ramsey, auctioneer, reports the sale of Stephen Landrum’s estate as fairly well attended, and things brought their full value.

The Democrat, Wednesday, November 16, 1892.

 

Will Book 2, Page 143

Dated: August 19, 1892

Recorded: September 26, 1892

 

Real Estate Deals

W. C. Landrum and other heirs of Stephen Landrum, to R. H. Ware, seventy-six acres on Stoner, and storehouse and lot in Schoolsville, consideration, title conveyed by Ware in other lands to interested parties.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, July 8, 1898

Landrum, Thomas Elya Landrum infant orphan of Thomas Landrum decd. came personally into court and made choice of Henry Fesler as her guardian with Solomon Hornbush security.

Order Book 10 P. 17 December 1830

Landrum, W. C. The Winchester Sun Thur., 6-28, 6-29-1951
Landrum, William Rev. William Landrum, a Methodist minister, died very suddenly at his home in Laurel county last Monday about noon. He had just finished a very fervent prayer for rain and was sitting in a chair by the window, when all at once he expired with scarcely a struggle. So far as is known, he was troubled with no specific complaint. Mr. Landrum was born May 14th 1803, and consequently was a little over 76 years old at the time of his death. He lived and preached in this county for a number of years, and was well known and highly esteemed by a great many of our people.

The Semi-Weekly Sun     Fri., 6-6-1879

Landsberg, Jacob Louisville Jeweler Suicides

Louisville, Ky., May 30

Jacob Landsberg, a jeweler, 50 years of age, desponent over his continued ill-health, committed suicide at 8:30 o’clock Wednesday morning by shooting himself.

The Winchester Democrat Tue., June 4, 1901

Landsberg, Theodore The Winchester Sun Sat., 12-13, 12-15-1919
Landsberg, William Death of William Landsberg.

Saturday, Mr. Theodore Landsberg received a telegram announcing the sudden death of his father, William Landsberg, at his home in Cincinnati. He was about seventy-two years old and was the senior member of the firm of Wm. Landsberg and Son, of this city. He had been quite successful in business and had always been noted for his upright dealings. Besides daughters he leaves three sons, Theodore, of this city, Simeon W. of Versailles, and Henry, of Brunswick, New Jersey. The funeral was held in Cincinnati.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, May 9, 1899

 

A Peaceful End.

The Democrat was in error Tuesday in stating that Mr. Wm. Landsberg had died in Cincinnati. He had been the guest of his son, Mr. Theodore Landsberg, of this city, and two weeks ago left for New York where he intended keeping house with one of his daughters, so he could be in close touch with the importers and manufacturers of the East in purchasing goods for the three stores. Mr. Landsberg after dining in the evening, told his daughter that he would retire to his room to enjoy a cigar and read the evening paper. The next morning, when   they went to call him, he was found in his dressing robe sitting in a large arm chair where the messenger of death had passed and gently left the impress of his presence. The remains were brought to Cincinnati and interred beside his wife who had preceded him several years. Mr. Landsberg was seventy-five years of age and during his long and eventful business career his name had stood for financial integrity and probity.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, May 12, 1899

Landus, Cary Killed by the Cars

Cary Landus, aged seventeen years, in attempting to jump from a railroad train at Lawrenceburg, was thrown against the cattle guard and so mangled that he died a few hours after. He was in the employ of the railroad.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, April 26, 1898

Landy, Sam A Puzzled Jury

The ordinary jury composed of good common people, and not medical specialist are often at a loss when medical specialist testify on both sides of a case, and such a case is now on trial at Danville.   Last July Ed Williams quarreled with Sam Landy, a wealthy merchant and hit him on the head with a brick.   Eight days later Landy died of lockjaw. Eight or ten doctors testified that lockjaw always comes from a microbe. Evidence showed that Landy rubbed old tallow on the wound and also had spread an old horse blanket on the grass and took a nap.   The question is did the lock jaw microbe come from the brick that made the wound, the tallow with which it was dressed or the horse blanket on which he lay? On this question depends that of whether Williams is guilty of murder, or of simply wounding, and the jury is puzzled to know the origin of the lockjaw microbe.

The Winchester Democrat Fri., Jan. 26, 1906

Lane, A. J. The Winchester Sun Wed., 4-11-1962
Lane, Abe The Winchester Sun Thur., 4-9, 4-10-1970
Lane, Aggie                         AA Fox Station.

Aggie Lane, a crazy colored woman at the county farm set her clothing on fire and was so badly burned that she died last night.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, December 16, 1898

Lane, Annie Mae Female, Single, 26 years old, Father-Roger Lane, Mother-Rachel Turner, Died April 12, 1921 of tuberculosis, Buried April 13, 1921.

Kentucky Vital Statistics Death Certificate Number 7441, Volume 1921.

Lane, Annie Mae Female, Single, 26 years old, Father-Roger Lane, Mother-Rachel Turner, Died April 12, 1921 of tuberculosis, Buried April 13, 1921.

Kentucky Vital Statistics Death Certificate Number 7441, Volume 1921.

Lane, Arthur Harrison The Winchester Sun Sat., 11-7, 11-9-1974
Lane, Billy H. The Winchester Sun Mon., 12-8-2003
Lane, Carrie B. The Winchester Sun Tues., 7-3-1951
Lane, Charles The Winchester Sun Thur., 1-30-1913
Lane, Charles     (Layne) The Winchester Sun Mon., 9-23, 9-27-1912
Lane, Douglas Wayne The Winchester Sun Sat., 3-3-2001
Lane, Ernest                            AA Infant Is Found Dead In Crib

Ernest Lane, eight-month-old son of James and Bina Mae Lane, S. Upper Street died early this morning at his home after becoming entangled between the side of this baby crib and mattress.

Deputy Coroner Charles Gatson said the child apparently died of strangulation at approximately 2 a.m. Mr. Lane works as a janitor at City Hall.

Funeral services will be conducted at 1 p.m. Monday at the Haggard and Son Funeral Home by the Rev. J. W. Jones.

THE WINCHESTER SUN SAT. 5/11/1963

Lane, Ernest E. The Winchester Sun Tues., 9-8-1959
Lane, Ernnest The Winchester Sun Sat., 5-11-1963
Lane, Fannie Emerson Wm. Lane of Case county, Mo., is visiting relatives here. Mr. Lane is a native of this county but left here in1865. He married Miss Fannie Emerson, of this county but she has been dead for several years.

The Democrat, Wednesday, January 22, 1890.

Lane, father W. R. Lane has returned from Virginia where he went to settle up the estate of his father who died recently.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, September 10, 1897

Lane, Frank The Winchester Sun Fri., 8-25-1916
Lane, Frank The Winchester Sun Fri., 9-15-1950
Lane, Franklin K. The Winchester Sun, Wed., 5-18-1921
Lane, Fred The Winchester Sun Mon., 3-26-1928
Lane, Horace Largest Boy in Kentucky Dead.

Paducah, Ky., July 14.—Horace Lane, the largest boy of his age in Kentucky, if not in the United States, died at his home in Ballard county. He was 15 years old, weighed 355 pounds and was six feet high. No coffin could be found large enough, and a carpenter had to make one.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, July 18, 1902

 

A Big Boy.

Horace Lane, a boy fifteen years of age, who weighed 355 pounds died in Ballard county, of typhoid fever. He was thought to be the largest boy of his age in the State.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, July 25, 1902

Lane, Huston The Winchester Sun Fri., 8-26-1921
Lane, J. S. Sentence affirmed

In the Madison Circuit court Ernest Hays was given twenty-one years in the penitentiary for killing his brother-in-law, J.S. Lane, at Berea. He appealed but the Court of Appeals affirmed the sentence.

The Winchester Democrat Tuesday, October 11, 1910

Lane, James James Lane’s Admin. vs. James Lane’s Heirs ………….Equity

……..continued

Order Book 12; P.17; July Court 1864

 

James Lane’s Admin. vs. G. C. Mullins &c ………..Equity

……….continued

Order Book 12; P. 83; November Court 1864

 

James Lane’s Admin. vs. James Lane’s Widow …………Equity

……………….continued

Order Book 12; P. 84; November Court 1864

 

James Lane’s Admin. vs. James Lane’s Heirs &c …….Equity

……Commissioner’s report filed …………

Order Book 12; P. 93; January Court 1865

 

James Lane’s Admin. vs. James Lane’s Creditors ……………..Equity

Master’s report filed……………

Order Book 12; P. 99; May Court 1865

 

Report is remanded and cause is continued

Order Book 12; P. 106; May Court 1865

 

Asa T. Brockman vs. Gordon C. Mullins

Consent of parties this action is consolidated stand revised against A. H. Buckner admin. of Gordon C. Mullins …submitted…pay to plaintiff Asa T. Brockman ….to admin. of James Lane dec.,…continued

Order Book 12; P. 173; May Court 1865

 

Equity continued

Order Book 12; P. 213; July Court 1865

Order Book 12; P. 214; July Court 1865

 

James Laine admin. vs. James Laine heirs

Order Book 12; P. 222; November Court 1865

 

James Lane’s Admin. vs. James Lane’s Heirs &c ………Equity

……….continued

Order Book 12; P. 305; November Court 1865

 

James Lane’s Admin. vs. G. C. Mullins &c ……Equity

……….continued

Order Book 12; P. 306; November Court 1865

 

James Lane’s admin. against James Lane’s Crs. ……..Equity

………..continued.

Order Book 12; P. 321; May Court 1866

 

Asa T. Brockman vs. Gordon C. Mullins &c ……..Equity

James Rutledge vs. Gordon C. Mullins &c ……….Equity

James Laines’ Admin. vs. Gordon C. Mullins &c ……..Equity

A. L. Haggard vs. Gordon C. Mullins &c ………Equity

Jesse G. Hart vs. Gordon C. Mullins &c ………….Equity

T. & J. S. Emerson vs. Gordon C. Mullins &c ………Equity

John G. Locknane vs. Gordon C. Mullins &c ………Equity

Edward Cox vs. Gordon C. Mullins &c ………..Equity

………….adjudged the receiver Jesse F. Williams ….pay ………..and the papers of these suits are ordered filed away.

Order Book 12; P. 426; July Court 1866

 

James Lane’s Admin. vs. James Lane’s heirs …….Equity

………..continued.

Order Book 12; P. 431; July Court 1866

 

James Lane’s Admin. vs. James Lane’s Heirs &c ……….Equity

Master’s report filed …..noted.

Order Book 12; P. 452; November Court 1866

 

James Lane’s Admin. vs. James Lane’s Heirs …………Equity

………submitted to court.

Order Book 12; P. 463; November Court 1866

 

James Lane’s Admin. vs. James Lane’s Heirs

Order Book 12; P. 479; November Court 1866

Lane, James Lane heirs vs. Joicy Shearer & co.

Collins and wife vs. Henry & co.

Adjudged that Joicy Shearer and Mrs. Collins are entitled respectively to hold the land conveyed by the deeds of James Lane…each entitled to compensation from James Lane’s estate for the value of the widows dower received therein…..

Order Book 13; P. 246 – 247; May Court 1868

 

Tilly Emerson administrator of E. H. Collins & co. vs. John Schooler & Patsey Schooler & co.

Tract of land in the petition was conveyed to the defendant Patsey Schooler through mistake by the heirs of James Lane decd….should have been conveyed to Polly Ann Collins the infant child of E. H. Collins decd. subject to the dower right of said Patsey Schooler as if it had descended from said E. H. Collins to the said Patsey Ann Collins as his heir at law….John Schooler and Patsey Schooler his wife shall deed the title of said tract of land to the said Polly Ann Collins to be held by her subject to the right of dower therein of her mother, Patsey Schooler…On cross petition A. L. Haggard administrator of William Baldwin decd., it appearing that Edwin H. Collins at his death was indebted to William Baldwin in the following sums of money….still due and unpaid now ordered Master Commissioner to sell part of said tract to pay debt…Sale to be made subject to the dower right of said Patsey Schooler…she is entitled to one third of tract of land during her natural life…Commissioner ordered to report…cause continued.

Order Book 13; P. 322 – 323; November Court 1868

 

James Lane heirs & co. vs. Joicey Shearer & co.

Patty A. Collins & co. vs. Henry J. Larimore

…plaintiffs in action against Joicey Shearer & co. and Henry J. Larimore the trustee of Lanes’ heirs pray on appeal from this judgment which is granted.

Order Book 13; P. 553; November Court 1869

Lane, James E. H. Collins administrator vs. John Schooler and company

H. Fielding Lane, John Henry and other heirs of James Lane deceased made petition …. A cross petition against plaintiffs and Polly Ann Collins, John Schooler and Patsey Schooler ….. amended petition filed.

Order Book 14; P. 278; November Court 1871

 

E. H. Collins administrator vs. John Schooler and company

A cross petition of James Lane heirs against John Schooler and wife and Polly Ann Collins……James Flanagan is appointed guardian ad litem to Polly Ann Collins infant…

Order Book 14; P. 466; November Court 1872

Lane, James Henry Sr. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-15, 11-16-1982
Lane, James Russell “Gabler” The Winchester Sun   Wed., 11-23-1983
Lane, James William The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-5, 12-6-1966
Lane, Janie Pearl Brewer The Winchester Sun   Fri., 1-2-1998
Lane, Jas. S. DIED-Sunday night at his home at Pine Grove, Dr. Jas. S. Lane, aged seventy-two years. He was raised here and lived here most of his life.   He leaves a wife formerly Miss Mary Montgomery. His funeral will be preached this morning at the residence by Rev. Robert, Graham and Rev. Chas. Loos, and the remains will be interred in the cemetery at this place. He was one of our best citizens and will be much missed.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, December 25, 1894.

 

THE Lexington Press pays the following well deserved tribute to the memory of Dr. Jas. S. Lane, of Pine Grove, the young people of his neighborhood and acquaintance, lost a loyal friend and a most generous host. He was never so happy as when, with his hospitable wife, he entertained a house-party of young guests at his country home, and the entertainment given them, was always of the heartiest and most lavish kind. The sincerest sympathy of many friends in Lexington is felt for his bereaved family.”

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, January 4, 1895.

 

Will Book 2, Page 166

Dated: August 1, 1878

Recorded: January 28, 1895

Lane, Joel THE WAR OF 1812 – Private

The Roll of Two Companies Raised in Clark County by Capt. James Sympson

Capt. James Sympson’s Company of Kentucky Mounted Volunteers, August 25th 1813.

The Semi-Weekly Sun     Fri., 2-21-1879

Lane, John Second Trip To The Asylum

Campton, Ky., March 24

John Lane, a prominent farmer of Clifty, was tried before Judge Congleton on the charge of lunacy and was ordered to the Eastern Kentucky asylum at Lexington. This is the second time he has been sent to the asylum.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., March 27, 1903

Lane, John The Winchester Sun   Sat., 5-15-1999
Lane, Julian                           AA The Winchester Sun   Thur., 4-28-1932
Lane, Lula The Winchester Sun   Tues., 11-24-1936
Lane, M. B. A Tragedy in Little Rock.

Little Rock, Ark., Nov. 26.—In North Little Rock Friday morning M. B. Lane, a section foreman while in a drunken frenzy emptied both barrels of a gun loaded with buckshot into his wife’s face, killing her instantly. The woman’s son, V. N. Wright, seized the gun and broke it over the murderer’s head crushing the skull. The Lanes came from Evansville two years ago.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, November 29, 1898

Lane, Mary The Winchester Sun   Thur., 11-14-1935
Lane, Mildred T. On motion of James Lane   who made oath thereto as the law directs certificate is granted him for obtaining letters of administration on the estate of Mildred T. Lane dec. ……….with Hubbard B. Taylor ……….bond in penalty of $6000 …….

Order Book 12; P. 401; September Court 1851

 

On motion of James Lane admin. of Mildred Lane dec. ordered that Frank McDonald, Nathan McDonald, James Rainey and James Weathers or any 3 ……..sworn do appraise ………personalty ….said decedent …..report.

Order Book 12; P. 401; September Court 1851

 

Inventory and appraisement of the personalty of Mildred T. Lane dec. was produced in court approved ………..recorded.

Order Book 12; P. 418; November Court 1851

 

Sale bill of the personalty of Mildred T. Lane dec. was produced …….approved ……..recorded.

Order Book 12; P. 483; August Court 1852

 

Settlement with the admin. of Mildred T. Lane dec. was produced …..filed ….

Order Book 12; P. 483; August Court 1852

 

Settlement with the admin. of Mildred T. Lane dec. being filed ……..again produced …….approved ……….recorded.

Order Book 12; P.489; September Court 1852

Lane, Mitchell C. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-1, 4-2-1968
Lane, Mrs. Alice J. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-2-1989
Lane, Mrs. Annette Hunt The Winchester Sun   Sat., 8-19-1944
Lane, Mrs. Berdie The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-12-1994
Lane, Mrs. Bertie The Winchester Sun   Thur., 7-3, 7-5-1997
Lane, Mrs. Betty Jane The Winchester Sun   Fri., 7-25-1997
Lane, Mrs. Carmie Helton The Winchester Sun Thur., 2-5-1981
Lane, Mrs. Cleo The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-6, 10-7-1969
Lane, Mrs. Eleanor The Winchester Sun   Mon., 6-16, 6-17-2008
Lane, Mrs. Etta The Winchester Sun   Sat., 7-7-1962
Lane, Mrs. Josephine Elliott The Winchester Sun   Fri., 3-7-1947
Lane, Mrs. Lady Prewitt Goosey The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-11-1985
Lane, Mrs. Leona The Winchester Sun   Thur., 1-5-1978
Lane, Mrs. Lucille Blackburn Lucille Blackburn Lane.

Daughter of Senator Blackburn, of Kentucky, Dies in Washington.

Washington, July 19.—Mrs. Lucille Blackburn Lane, daughter of Senator Blackburn, of Kentucky, and widow of the late Thomas F. Lane, of this city, died Friday at her residence here of brain fever and nervous prostration. She had been unconscious for more than a week. Her father and two sisters, Mrs. Hall and Miss Blackburn, were with her.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, July 25, 1902

Lane, Mrs. M. B. A Tragedy in Little Rock.

Little Rock, Ark., Nov. 26.—In North Little Rock Friday morning M. B. Lane, a section foreman while in a drunken frenzy emptied both barrels of a gun loaded with buckshot into his wife’s face, killing her instantly. The woman’s son, V. N. Wright, seized the gun and broke it over the murderer’s head crushing the skull. The Lanes came from Evansville two years ago.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, November 29, 1898

Lane, Mrs. Mapie Sparks The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-2-1955
Lane, Mrs. Margaret Helen The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-3, 10-4-1966
Lane, Mrs. Mary Alice The Winchester Sun   Wed., 3-7, 3-8, 3-9-1984
Lane, Mrs. Mary Bush The Winchester Sun   Tues., 7-14, 7-15-1970
Lane, Mrs. Mildred The Winchester Sun   Mon., 6-6, 6-7-1983
Lane, Mrs. Minnie L. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 10-14-1986
Lane, Mrs. Ollie B. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 7-11, 7-12-1968
Lane, Mrs. Oscar The Winchester Sun   Tues., 11-13-1934
Lane, Mrs. Priscilla Jenks

Brookshire

The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-23-2009
Lane, Mrs. Richard Diana Phillips The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-4-1929
Lane, Newton Excitement Over A Shooting

Nicholasville, Ky., Feb. 9

The town is somewhat excited over the shooting of Newton Lane by one of his work hands on the Fayette line. A mob was organized here to lynch Lane when he killed H. C. Rodenbaugh and his son in Versailles about four years ago. Rodenbaugh was very popular here, where he had lived. At the request of Mrs. Rodenbaugh the mob dispersed.   Lane was arrested here about nine months ago for using abusive language to a Negro.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Feb. 13, 1900

Lane, Ralph Phillips The Winchester Sun   Fri., 12-24-1937
Lane, Roland The Winchester Sun   Fri., 1-19-1968
Lane, Roy Edward The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-13-1935
Lane, Samuel The Winchester Sun   Sat., 7-23-1921
Lane, Sara Elizabeth The Winchester Sun   Thur., 8-25, 8-26-1966
Lane, Shing Murder at a Picnic.

Richmond, Ky., Aug. 25.—At a picnic at Cobb Mountain, Estill county, Shing Lane and Ed Noland became involved in a quarrel, which ended in Noland stabbing Lane to death. The trouble was the result of an old grudge. Noland was lodged in jail at Irvine.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, August 30, 1898

Lane, Silas Thomson Station Items-Died-At his home in Montgomery county, on Saturday 13th inst., Mr. Silas Lane. He had been ill with typhoid pneumonia and had had so far recovered as to be able to go about, but he was taken again suddenly Friday and died Saturday.

Clark County Democrat   Wed., 3-17-1880

Lane, Silas B. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 4-3-1942
Lane, sister The Winchester Sun Sat., 5-24-1913
Lane, son The Winchester Sun   Tues., 6-7-1921
Lane, Steven O. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 5-19, 5-21-2004
Lane, Thomas To Go To The Asylum

Gov. Beckham has respited Thomas Lane, a convict, in the penitentiary from Estill county, that he may be sent to the lunatic asylum.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Jan. 4, 1901

Lane, Thomas F. Blackburn’s Son-In-Law Suicides

Washington, Oct. 17

Thomas F. Lane, son-in-law of Senator Blackburn of Kentucky, committed suicide here by shooting himself in the head. Mr. Lane had been told by his physicians that he was suffering from Bright’s disease, and despondency caused by this is supposed to have inspired the deed.   He died about half an hour after the shot at his home on K street, N. W.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Oct. 23, 1900

Lane, Verlon The Winchester Sun Fri., 10-27-1978
Lane, Vina Marie The Winchester Sun     Mon., 2-12-1990
Lane, Walker The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-27-1937
Lane, Wilbur The Winchester Sun   Wed. 10-12-1922
Lane, Wilbur The Winchester Sun   Tues., 10-11, 10-12, 10-13-1932
Lane, Will WILL LANE, a brakeman on the Cincinnati Southern who lived at Clay City, was caught between the cars while coupling them and killed.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, November 6, 1894.

Lane, William The Winchester Sun   Thur., 3-11-1926
Lane, William H. On the motion of James J. Emerson who made oath thereto as the law directs certificate is granted him for obtaining letters of administration on the estate of William H. Lane dec. in due form giving security whereupon he together with Francis Emerson entered into and acknowledged their bond in penalty of $1500 conditioned as the law directs.

Order Book 11; P.53; November Court 1840

 

Ordered that Jesse Hampton, John Evans, Enoch Elkin and Asa S. Wright or any three of them being first sworn do appraise in current money the slaves if any and personal estate of William H. Lane dec. and make report thereof to the court.

Order Book 11; P.53; November Court 1840

 

Inventory and appraisement of the estate of William H. Lane dec. was produced in court examined allowed and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 11; P. 66; April Court 1841

Lane, William N. Ordered that William Ritchie, William F. Hockaday and William Hickman settle and adjust all accounts with Hubbard Taylor Jr. guardian to Clarissa, Mary Ann, Alice, William, and Tanner Lane infant heirs of William N. Lane decd. and make report.

Order Book 10; P. 23; February Court 1831

 

Settlement with Hubbard   Taylor Jr. guardian to the infant heirs of William N. Lane decd. was ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 10; P. 42; October Court 1831

Laney, W. J. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-13-1965
Lang, Anna D. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 8-8-1991
Lang, Jack The Winchester Sun   Sat., 1-12-1918
Lang, Jesse A Boy Murderer.

Hopkinsville, Ky., March 29.—Alex. Reeves, aged 14 years shot and killed Jesse Lang, aged 12, at Longview Sunday evening. Reeves is in jail and claims it was accidental. The verdict of the coroner’s inquest says the shooting was unjustifiable.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, April 5, 1898

Lang, Louis Gov. Brown has granted a pardon to John Havely, who shot and killed Louis Lang at Cynthiana last May. The Governor was satisfied from testimony offered him that Lang had told the city Marshall that he intended to kill Havely on sight and this statement, reaching the cars of Havely, he shot him on sight.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, October 25, 1893

Lang, Mrs. Alma The Winchester Sun   Tue., 7-27, 7-28-1915
Lang, Mrs. Hulda The Winchester Sun   Wed., 1-20, 1-26, 3-9-1932
Lang, Peter Died—Tuesday morning at his home on Cleveland Avenue, of pneumonia and meningitis, Peter Lang aged 47 years. His funeral was preached at the family residence on the following day by Rev. J. J. Chisholm and the remains were interred in the cemetery under the auspices of the Knights of Pythias, of which he was a member. He was a native of Lorraine, where he spent more than half his life. A few years ago he came here from Cynthiana. He leaves a wife, two sons and one daughter to mourn his loss. Among those from a distance who were present were Chas. Lang, of Covington; Mr., Mrs. And Miss Deschler, John Yager, and Mrs. Delmuth, of Cynthiana; Dr. C. E. Mooney, Mrs. John Reuter, F. W. Schoepperle and wife, of Lexington; Mr. and Mrs. Kinzel, and Miss Switzer of Cincinnati.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, November 1, 1895

 

Card of Thanks

We desire thus publicly to tender our heartfelt thanks to the pastor of the Presbyterian church and to the many friends who have extended kindness to us in our recent sore affliction. May God bless them.

Mrs. Peter Lang and Family

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, November 1, 1895

 

Mrs. J. Deschler and Miss Louella Deschler, of Cynthiana, were here Wednesday to attend the funeral of Peter Lang.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, November 1, 1895

Langdon, Jasper The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-17-1930
Lange, John Stone The Winchester Sun   Thur., 3-13, 3-14-1975
Langely, Robert W. Death Of Robert W. Langley

Robert W. Langley, died March 1st at his home in Texas, aged eighty-five years. He was raised here but went to Texas before the civil war and has resided there since. His wife, who was Miss Wallace, of this county, and to whom he was married more than half a century ago, survives him as does one son and three daughters. He has numerous relatives and friends here who will regret to hear of his death.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., March 10, 1903

Langfitt, Worley Creed The Winchester Sun   Tues., 6-5-1934
Langford, C. E. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 10-7-1954
Langford, Erma Lee The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-20, 12-21-2010
Langford, Henry Three Killed Near Mt. Vernon, Ky. – Mt. Vernon, Ky., Nov. 3 – A number of tough characters created a disturbance at the Crooked Creek precinct in this county Tuesday afternoon.   Sheriff Mullins attempted to restore order when a general shooting affray took place between the sheriff and his deputies and the disturbers, three of the latter being killed. The dead are Henry Langford, John Lawrence and Charles Payne.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday November 9, 1897

Langford, Hudson The Winchester Sun   Sat., 9-27, 10-27-1913
Langford, Jas. W. At Harrodsburg, Joe Noel was sent to the penitentiary for twenty-one years for killing J. W. Langford last winter. Langford was a wealthy farmer who, it was claimed, had seduced Noel’s sister.

The Democrat, Wednesday, May 28, 1890

 

CAMPBELL NOEL was sentenced Saturday at Harrodsburg to twenty-one years in the penitentiary, for the killing of Jas. W. Langford in January last.

The Democrat, Wednesday, November 26, 1890.

 

IN the Harrodsburg Circuit Court this week Campbell Noel was sentenced to the penitentiary for twenty one years for the murder of Jas. W. Langford about a year ago. Noel claims that his sister had been ruined by Langford, for which he shot him.

The Democrat, Wednesday, November 26, 1890.

Langford, Jennie Mae The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-6-1964
Langford, Mr._______ A young man by the name of Langford, of Pulaski, about 18 years of age, who has been in Laurel county for several weeks trying to dispose of some land belonging to his relatives in that county, while passing along a road beyond Altamont Tuesday thought he would take a rest under some chestnut trees alongside the road and laid down and went to sleep. The woods in that section were afire and burned up near enough to catch his clothes and before he could put it out they had burned off down to his socks.   He lived about eight hours and was clear up to a few minutes of his death.-Stanford Journal.

The Democrat, Wednesday, November 9, 1892.

Langham, Mrs. J. C. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 2-27-1932
Langhorne, E. Keene The Winchester Sun   Fri., 12-29-1916
Langley, Brownlee Wallace The Winchester Sun   Wed., 1-17-1923
Langley, Clifford Ray (Cap) The Winchester Sun Mon., 4-6, 4-7-2009
Langley, John R. On the motion of William Tuttle Certificate is granted him for obtaining letters of administration on the estate of John R. Langley decd. with John Cartwright security.

Order Book 10 P. 147 October 1833

Order for appraisal in current money the slaves if any and personal estate of John R. Langley decd. and make report to the court.

Order Book 10 P. 147 October 1833

Langley, John W. Settlement with William Tuttle administrator of the estate of John W. Langley dec. was produced in court examined allowed and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 11; P. 75; May Court 1841

Langley, John W. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 1-18-1932
Langley, Joseph R. A minister’s death

Elder Joseph R. Langley, father of Congressman, John W. Langley, of this district, died at his home in Floyd county, Tuesday after an illness of several months. Mr. Langley has been an invalid for fifteen years as a result of a severe stroke of paralysis. He was a minister of the Christian church and a very worthy man.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, April 12, 1910

Langly, John W. An appraisement of the estate of John W. Langly deceased was produced in court approved and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 10; P. 173; April Court 1834

 

Amount of sales of the estate of John W. Langly dec. was produced in court approved and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 10; P. 214; December Court 1834

Langston, Jude On Saturday night at Mt. Sterling, Sam Everett shot and instantly killed Jude Langston in a bar room.   The parties had been friends, and the killing grew out of a drunken quarrel. Langston was a son of Joab Langston, who formerly lived near Kiddville.

The Winchester Democrat     Wed., 11-20-1889

 

The coroner’s inquest over the body of Jude Langston, who was killed last week by Sam Averett, developed no cause for the killing either immediate or remote, but seemed to be merely the result of a drunken whim. He was tried before Squire Fizer and held over in $5,000 bail, while Thos. J. Young, who was in some way implicated, was held in $2,500 bail.

The Winchester Democrat     Wed., 11-27-1889

 

Sam Everett was held over in $8,000 and Thos. Young in $6,000 bond for the murder of Jude Langston.

The Democrat, Wednesday, January 8, 1890

 

Montgomery; Circuit Court in session. The cases of Sam Everett and T. J. Young for the murder of Jude Langston is the only case of importance on the docket.

The Democrat, Wednesday, June 18, 1890

 

Sam Everett was tried for the killing of Jude Langston and acquitted. Langston formerly lived in this county.

The Democrat, Wednesday, December 9, 1891.

 

Deputy Marshal Evans Shot and Killed at Mt. Sterling.

ANOTHER tragedy occurred at Mt. Sterling Saturday night. A negro named Johnson and a noted tough was raising a row in a saloon when Policemen Charles Evans and Horace Lane went in to arrest him. He fired first at Lane, the ball striking his silver badge just over the heart and glancing off without injury.   Johnson then shot Evans in the groin, inflicting a wound from which he died the next day. The negro was shot in the face and also in the breast and is badly hurt. When Evans died a mob was talked of but the officers prevailed and Judge Cooper will hold a special term June 28th to try Johnson, who will be hung if he don’t die of his wounds.
Evans, the dead policeman, was married last Wednesday to Mrs. Ida Langston, whose first husband was killed several years ago by Sam Everett. A brother of the murdered man lives in this city on Mt. Abbott.

Johnson had only been out of the pen a few weeks where he had been serving a sentence for shooting a negro woman a few years ago.

Henry Watson, the manager of our Telephone Exchange, was fired upon a few nights ago by some unknown party and it is now believed that Johnson was the man, as Watson, while on the police force, shot and killed Johnson’s father.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, June 18, 1895.

Langston, Milton Ordered that the Co. Treas. Pay John Gravett Six dollars for holding an inquest on Milton Langston body.

Order Book, 17; Page 169; March Court 1875

Clark County Courthouse Archives

Lanham, A. L. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 1-31-1927
Lanham, Bob Claims It Was Accidental

Owensboro, Ky., May 15

Bob Lanham, aged 25, of Henderson, was shot and killed while with Lizzie Gish, 22 years old, also of Henderson, who claims the shooting was accidential. The woman was arrested.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., May 22, 1900

 

Lizzie Gish Acquitted

Owensboro, Ky., May 17

Lizzie Gish, the young Henderson woman who killed Robert Lanham, also of Henderson, in this city last Friday evening, was acquitted on the ground that the shooting was accidential.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., May 22, 1900

Lanham, Mrs. Margaret The Winchester Sun   Sat., 2-24-1923
Lanham, Richard Owensboro – Richard Lanham, a farmer and for half a century a resident of Daviess county, died of infirmities of old age. He was 83 years old, and leaves his widow and five children. Mrs. Sam Brashear, of the Redd neighborhood, died of a complication of diseases following several weeks’ illness. Her husband and four children survive.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, August 26, 1910

Lanham, Robert The Winchester Sun   Fri., 10-8, 10-9-2010
Lanhan, James The Winchester Sun Fri., 11-8-1912
Lanier, Robert C. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-3, 5-4, 5-6-1993
Lankfor, Gib The Winchester   Sun   Mon., 6-26-1933
Lankford, Frank The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-6-1926
Lankford, Grover Struck By Pay Car

Bridwell, Ky., June 20

Grover Lankford, 22 years old, single, employed by the I. C. R. R. Co., as bridge carpenter at East Cairo, Ky., was struck by a pay car and killed. He lived at Huntington, Tenn.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., June 22, 1906

Lankford, Mrs. Thelma Estes The Winchester Sun   Fri., 1-10-2003
Lankfort, Mrs. Mary The Winchester Sun   Fri., 5-8, 5-11-1931
Lannin, Della Fatally Burned

Russelville, Ky., Jan. 28—Della Lannin, aged three was fatally burned Wednesday morning. The little girl was standing in front of a grate when her clothing caught fire.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, January 29, 1897

Lansdale, Paul The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-12-2001
Lansing, Mrs. Paul The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-9-1923
Lansing, Paul The Winchester Sun Fri., 11-9-1923
Lanter, Carroll L. (Chuck) The Winchester Sun   Tues., 5-23-2000
Lanter, Frank Holladay The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-14, 9-15-1987
Lanter, J. D. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 3-13-1941
Lanter, J. Frank The Winchester Sun   Mon., 1-25-1915
Lanter, J. Frank Sr. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 6-5, 6-8-1946
Lanter, James David The Winchester Sun   Wed., 9-25-1940
Lanter, James Wesley Sr. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 10-17-1989
Lanter, Jesse Frank Jr. (Peaches) The Winchester Sun   Tues., 11-3, 11-4-1970
Lanter, Jesse Frank Sr. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-2, 2-3-1970
Lanter, John Near Doylerville, Madison county, January 23rd, John Lanter, aged 54 years.

The Democrat, Wednesday, February 3, 1892.

Lanter, Judith Tupman The Winchester Sun   Fri., 2-22, 2-23, 2-25-2008
Lanter, Mildred Louise The Winchester Sun   Tues., 1-21-1919
Lanter, Mrs. Fannie Brandenburg The Winchester Sun   Fri., 2-14-1986
Lanter, Mrs. Ibbie The Winchester Sun   Thur., 8-7-1947
Lanter, Mrs. Lizzie Death Of Mrs. Lanter

Mrs. Lizzie Lanter, wife of Wm. Lanter died at her home near Doylesville, Madison county, Sunday after a long illness. Her death was hastened by the tragic death of a favorite son, who accidentally shot himself inflicting a fatal wound.

Mrs. Lanter was about forty years old, and was a daughter of Jas. Guyton formerly of this city, and was also a neice of Capt. W. A. Attersall of this city. She leaves a husband and one child.

The remains will be buried at Richmond today, the funeral services at the residence, being conducted by Eld. Martin.

Rest of article not readable.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Jan. 8, 1901

Lanter, Mrs. Margaret Cole The Winchester Sun   Wed., 8-30-1967
Lanter, Mrs. Margaret Cole The Winchester Sun   Sat., 9-30-1967
Lanter, Mrs. Mary Sydney The Winchester Sun   Sat., 9-17, 9-19-2005

Scobee Funeral Home Web Site Fri., 9-16-2005

Lanter, Mrs. Nannie Jett The Winchester Sun   Tues., 3-23-1948
Lanter, Mrs. T. Jeff Mrs. T. Jeff Lanter died at her home near here Tuesday, of a complication of diseases. Funeral preached by Rev. B.B. Bailey, of Winchester, and remains interred in the family graveyard.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, June 19, 1896

Lanter, Newton Died—Newton Lanter, of Union, Madison county, died Monday aged seventy-two years. He was a Confederate veteran, having belonged to Col. Tucker’s regiment, the Eleventh Kentucky.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, April 22, 1898

Lanter, Ruah Clay Deaths

Died, at Normal, Ill., on Nov. 2nd, Ruah Clay Lanter, the five-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Enos Lanter at their home at 213 West Denison St. from membranous croup. The burial was in Bloomington, Ill., cemetery.

The Sun-Sentinel   Thur., Nov. 9, 1905

Lanter, T. Jeff Jeff Lanter a highly respected citizen of this county died at his residence near Becknerville Thursday. He had been sick for some time but his death was quite unexpected. He had lived in this county but a few years having come here from Madison county. He was aged about 65 or 70 years and was noted as one of the most skillful farmers in the county.

The Democrat, Wednesday, January 1, 1890

 

Mr. J. Frank Lanter, son of T. Lanter, deceased, has gone to live with his mother, at Becknerville, Clark county.—Richmond Climax.

The Democrat, Wednesday, February 5, 1890.

 

J. Frank Lanter appointed administrator of T. Jeff Lanter, and Thorn W. Hampton, Wm. Harris and W. H. Tucker appraisers.

The Democrat, Wednesday, February 5, 1890.

Lanter, William Wm. Lanter, who lived near Doylesville, Madison county, died on Monday, of last week of inflammation of the stomach. Funeral services by Rev. J. L. Wills. Several years ago the deceased was arrested by the U. S. officials for violation of the internal revenue laws and the nervous excitement produced by his arrest caused every particle of his hair and beard to fall out and it never grew again.

The Democrat, Wednesday, September 2, 1891.

Lanter, William Eld. J. W. Harding was summoned to Madison county Sunday to preach the funeral of William Lanter, who died at his home near Union.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Jan. 28, 1902

Lantern, Guy The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-9-1936
Laphem, Frederick E. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 4-17, 4-23-1954
Lapsley, James Thomas Danville, Ky., – Dr. James Thomas Lapsley, oldest living graduate of Princeton University and of Center College, Kentucky, died here, aged 91 years. He finished the course at Center College in 1839, and two years later took a degree at Princeton. Afterward he was ordained to the ministry of the Presbyterian church. As a clergyman he became widely known throughout the south.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, May 3, 1910

Lard, Moses E. Elder Moses E. Lard died at his home in Lexington last Friday morning. He has for years been regarded by many as the leading minister of the Christian church and was certainly a very able and excellent man.

Clark County Democrat     Wed., 6-23-1880

Large, Jess A. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 6-20-2002
Large, Thomas The Winchester Sun   Wed., 7-3-1940
Larison, Austin J. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-18, 12-28-1944
Larison, Austin J. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 3-23-1949
Larison, daughter Spout Springs Notes

Died, Wednesday, Feb. 13, the little two-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Larison of pneumonia.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Feb. 19, 1901

Larison, David The Winchester Sun Mon., 3-25-1912
Larison, Inez The Winchester Sun   Tue., 3-30-1915
Larison, John Dudley The Winchester Sun Sat., 11-21-1981
Larison, John W. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-30-1991
Larison, Mrs. John Kimbrell

Mr. John Larison who left this county for Indiana two years ago is here on a visit to relatives, his wife has died since he left Ky.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Aug. 18, 1903

Larison, Oliver The Winchester Sun   Tue., 3-30-1915
Larison, Sarah Elizabeth The Winchester Sun   Fri., 10-29-1971
Larison, William The Winchester Sun   Tue., 3-30-1915
Larison, William T. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-4-1939
Larison, Zora The Winchester Sun,   Wed., 5-11-1921
Larkey, Tim The Winchester Sun   Fri., 5-1-1987
Larkin, B. R. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 5-18-1954
Larkin, John Walter Accidentally shot

Walter Larkin, aged fourteen years, and living in Fayette county, accidentally shot and killed himself Monday. He was dressing to go to school and took a suit of clothes from a trunk, when a pistol, which was in one of the pockets fell to the floor and exploded, the bullet striking the boy near the heart killing him instantly.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, December 21, 1906

 

Accidentally killed

John W. Larkin, aged fifteen, son of John C. Larkin, of South Elkhorn neighborhood, while handling a pistol Monday, dropped it, the bullet being discharged, and the lad receiving a fatal wound, dying a few minutes later.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, December 25, 1906

 

Revolver fell from pocket

Exploded, killing the young scion of ill-fated family

Lexington, Ky., – Walter Larkin, 14, son of John Larkin, a wealthy farmer, accidentally shot and killed himself. The lad was preparing to start to school when a revolver, which the family did not know he carried, fell from his pocket and exploded, the bullet entering the left breast. The accident was witnessed by his two younger brothers. By the time the father reached his side he was dead. The boy was a grandson of Rankin Clemmons, the wealthiest man in the county, whose family has suffered many tragic accidents during the past five years. Several years ago Robert Clemmons brother of Mrs. Larkin, committed suicide by shooting; two years ago young Rankin Clemmons committed suicide; three years ago Mrs. Sheppard, daughter of Rankin Clemmons, committed suicide; three months ago Ernest Clemmons, cousin of young Larkin, was killed in a sawmill, while several years ago Rankin Clemmons, the elder, was called to his door in the night and assaulted by robbers.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, December 25, 1906

Larkin, William The Winchester Sun   Thur., 9-9-1920
Larocque, infant The Winchester Sun   Tues., 2-5, 2-6-2008
Larrison, A. J. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 2-6-1945
Larrison, Andrew L. The Winchester Sun Wed., 7-30-1913
Larrison, Annie Lee The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-28-1931
Larrison, Arthur Little Arthur Larrison, of Kiddville, fell into a kettle of hot lye, and was so badly scalded that he died in a few hours.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, May 27, 1891

Larrison, Herbert Benjamin The Winchester Sun   Fri., 4-9-1954
Larrison, Isaac The Winchester Sun   Tues., 3-12-1940
Larrison, Kizar Jr. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 1-6-1995
Larrison, Lewis The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-11, 10-12-1965
Larrison, Mrs. Bettsy The Winchester Sun   Wed., 5-31-1944
Larrison, Mrs. Elizabeth The Winchester Sun   Tues., 2-17-1920
Larrison, Mrs. Lula W. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-8-1968
Larrison, Mrs. Nettie The Winchester Sun   Thur. 10-17-2002
Larrison, Mrs. Nina McIntosh The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-18, 3-19-1946
Larrison, Mrs. Sallie F. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-5-1934
Larrison, Mrs. Zula Ball The Winchester Sun   Tues., 3-21-1950
Larrison, Omer Zachariah The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-18-1935
Larrison, Phillip The Winchester Sun   Tues., 12-18-1984
Larrison, Raymond Edward The Winchester Sun   Fri., 6-17-1921
Larrison, Thelma Louise The Winchester Sun   Fri., 2-18-1994
Larrison, Truman The Winchester Sun Mon., 1-25-1943
Larrison, William Rollie The Winchester Sun   Sat., 11-27-1954
Larrson, Mrs. Amsettie The Winchester Sun   Sat., 5-16, 5-18-1970
Larry, Carl The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-24-1971
Larry, Ernest C. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 4-24-1992
Larry, Ernest Carl The Winchester Sun   Wed., 5-28-1986
Larry, Gary Chenault The Winchester Sun   Sat., 1-29-1949
Larry, James “Mace The Winchester Sun   Tues., 1-3-1989
Larry, James B. (Big Benny) The Winchester Sun   Tues., 8-9, 8-11-1994
Larry, Jean (Mama) The Winchester Sun   Wed., 11-24, 11-26, 11-27-1999
Larry, Mrs. Johnnie Bealer The Winchester Sun   Fri., 4-10, 4-11-1970
Larry, Mrs. Nettie The Winchester Sun   Wed., 6-1, 6-2-2005
Larry, Mrs. Ruth The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-25-1954
Larson, Hyte Mountaineers’ Deadly Duel

SERGEANT, Ky., July 1-News has reached here from the Virginia side of the Cumberland mountains, in Buchanan county, that Hyte Larson and Bill Jorden, two notorious mountaineers, who had been enemies for several years, met on a lonely path in the mountains and engaged in a terrible battle. Larson opened fire on Jorden, who returned it, and a deadly battle ensued, which cost Larson’s life. Bill Jorden, it is thought, made his escape across the country into the mountains of southern West Virginia. They were both bad men, and had killed several men.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, July 2, 1895.

Larson, Mrs. _______ Kiddville Items-Died-On Sunday February 27th, of pleurisy, at Bob Paces, Mrs. Larson.   The deceased lived in Estill county, and at the time of her death was here waiting on her daughter, Mrs. Crow, who has the fever. She was suddenly taken on Thursday and died on Sunday at half-past 3 o’clock

Clark County Democrat     Wed., 3-9-1881

Larter, Taylor Found Unconscious.

Taylor Larter Was Found in a field Near Jabez—A Bloody Stone Was by His Side.

Columbia, Ky., May 12.—The man found near Jabez, Russell county, Wednesday in an unconscious condition was Taylor Larter, a highly respected and well to do citizen of that county. He died Wednesday night without regaining consciousness. A large stone found near the body was covered with blood and hair and is supposed to have been the weapon used. Larter disappeared a week ago and had not been seen since until found by his wife. He is supposed to have been in the field where found since he disappeared. It is an old unused field. It is said that Larter some time ago discovered some crooked work and told of it. The authorities are working on a clew as to the murder.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, May 16, 1899

LaRue, John A. The Winchester Sun Wed., 11-27-1912
Larue, Mrs. Charles W. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 1-12-1970
Lary, Allen The Winchester Sun   Tues., 1-4-1983
Lary, Alsey The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-14-2009
Lary, Ben Curtis The Winchester Sun   Sat., 1-4-1964
Lary, Corneilus Price

 

Died-Friday night after a week’s illness, little Corneilus Price, age seven weeks, son of Mr. and Mrs. S. B. Lary. The bereaved family has the deepest sympathy of the community.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, April 9, 1897.

 

A PECULIAR burial occurred at Clintonville Sunday. The infant of Simon Lary and wife was buried with impressive ceremonies, conducted in the sign language by Rev. F. J. Cheek, of Paris. The parents of the child are mutes, but the child had good use of its appeal organs.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, April 9, 1897.

Lary, Cyrus Allen The Winchester Sun   Thur., 5-29-1952
Lary, John Jesse Brown, colored, was hung at Paducah Friday for the murder of John Lary a year ago.

The Democrat, Wednesday, January 20, 1892.

Lary, John C. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 5-25, 5-26-1934
Lary, Lee The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-14, 11-16-1977
Lary, Mrs. Lois Drayer The Winchester Sun Sat., 5-23-1981
Lary, Mrs. Mary Auctioneer M. F. Kenney sold on Wednesday for W. F. Heathman, administrator of Mrs. Mary Lary, her farm of 80 acres, near Clintonville, to A. L. Stevenson, at $82.50 per acre.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Feb. 20, 1906

Lary, Mrs. Nettie L. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-30, 12-2, 12-3-1987
Lary, Mrs. Roberta Brashear The Winchester Sun     Sat., 2-29, 3-2-1936
Lary, Virgil P. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 1-8, 1-9-1973
Lary, Wallace The Winchester Sun Sat., 8-31-1912
Lary, William T. (Napp) The Winchester Sun   Fri., 4-19, 4-20-1996
Larzelere, J. R. Dr. J. R. Larzelere, the eminent specialist of the France Medical and Surgical Institute, who came here as advertised, but had been here but a little while when he was taken ill of pneumonia. He started home and got as far as Lexington where he was forced to stop. The disease progressed so rapidly that he died on last Tuesday. The medical staff of the Institute is a large one and another specialist will be sent to fill his place.

The Democrat, Wednesday, January 1, 1890

Lashall, Esther Settlement with the administrators of the estate of Esther Lashall decd. ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 10 P. 33 May 1831

Additional settlement with John Donaldson Jr. administrator of the estate of Esther Lashells decd. ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 10 P. 87 October 1832

Lashbrook, Mrs. James Ravished and Murdered.

Richard Coleman, a Young Negro, Arrested and Confesses to Killing Mrs. James Lashbrook.

Maysville, Ky., Oct. 6.—Mrs. James Lashbrook, the wife of a well to do farmer and a member of one of the oldest families in this county, was ravished and murdered Thursday afternoon at her home at Clarks station, six miles from this city. While alone at home she went to an outhouse and while there it is suppose that one or more tramps who have been in the neighborhood for several days attacked her. After the outrage her assailants secured a club and beat out the woman’s brains.

Thursday night the officers brought in Richard Coleman, a young Negro, who confessed to having murdered Mrs. Lashbrook. They were able to get him into the jail through a mob of 500 people by telling the crowd they were not sure of Coleman’s guilt. It is doubtful that they will be able to save the Negro’s life throughout the night.

At 2 o’clock Friday morning the mob broke down the jail door. The first man to enter was thrown out by the guards inside, who then stood off the crowd with drawn guns. The mob lacks a leader, but it is feared another attempt to lynch Coleman will be made when reinforcements reach here from neighborhoods in which Mrs. Lashbrook lived.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, October 10, 1899

 

Dick Coleman’s Trial

Covington, Ky., Nov. 2

It is now pretty well understood that Dick Coleman, the colored murderer of Mrs. John Lashbrook, of Maysville, will be furnished with a military guard to escort him back to Maysville. Coleman’s trial will begin November 10. The people of Maysville, where the man so brutally assulted and fiendishly murdered Mrs. Lashbrook, are still so wrought up that it is generally understood that Coleman will never face a jury.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Nov. 7, 1899

 

Burned At The Stake

Dick Coleman, the Murderer of Mrs. Lashbrook, Meets a Horrible Death.

He Is Taken From the Custody of the Sheriff and His Deputies by an Infuriated Mob.

A Rope is Thrown Over His Head and While Pleading for Mercy Brushwood and Timber is Piled About Him and Lighted by Many Willing Hands.

Maysville, Ky., Dec. 7.—Negro murderer Dick Combs arrived at 10:30 Wednesday morning under a special guard of deputies sworn in by the sheriff, including Detective Fitzgerald, Constable Dawson, chief of Police Dawson, all of the police force and two deputy sheriffs. When they arrived at the court house they were met by fully 1,000 people, headed by James Lashbrook, the husband of the murdered   woman, and went immediately up Second street through the central portion of the city to the hill, followed by fully five thousand of the citizens of this city and county. This is the first time anything of this kind ever happened in this city, and the excitement is intense. All was done that was possible by the Sheriff and his guard to prevent a lynching, but in the face of such a mob of people, irrespective of color, it was useless to attempt to do anything save deliver him up, which was done. They grabbed him and threw a rope over his head, and took him above the city and strung him up. The poor wretch could be heard above the cries of the mob, pleading for his life, but the mob only heard the cries of Mr. Lashbrook, and vengeance they meted out to him was just the thing.

About 250 were at the C. & O. train Tuesday night expecting him, but as he failed to come they waited for him Wednesday morning. There is no telling what would have been done had they succeeded in getting him in jail, as there would have, undoubtedly been several killed in the attempt to storm the jail doors.

The mob carried Coleman to a small hollow near the railroad tracks, where they bound him tightly to a young sapling. Then they heaped a huge pile of brush wood and timber around and fired the stack, while his eyes rolled horribly. Someone cut out his eyes, and in a moment his head rolled around and he was believed to be dead.

Coleman said 15 minutes before he was set afire that he had nothing to say. His death was slow, and, writhing in terrible agony, he was hooted and glared at by the people standing on the edge of the pit. Many women were present. He died at 10:50 a. m.

The scene was an awful one, and around the funeral pyre were 10,000 maddened people, headed by the husband of the dead woman. A dozen torches were applied simultaneously, and huge tongues of fire swept up and around the agonized wretch.

Coleman’s Crime

Coleman’s crime was a most revolting one. He enticed Mrs. Mary Lashbrook into a shed on the pretense of looking at some work, and knocked her senseless with a club. He then assaulted her. She showed signs of returning to consciousness, and he ran to his room, got a razor and cut her throat. Again she revived and he ended her misery with a blow from an ax. He jumped on a horse, and riding to a field calmly told his victim’s husband that someone had killed her.

He was arrested later, and before Lashbrook suspected that he was the murderer, he was put on a train and taken to a Covington jail. He made a complete confession of the fiendish crime to a Post reporter on his arrival. He is only 20 years old and has a pleasant face. Mrs. Lashbrook was beautiful, and a society favorite in Maysville.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, December 8, 1899

 

Reward For Maysville Lynchers

Frankfort, Ky., Dec. 13

Gov. Bradley offered a reward of $500 for the apprehension and conviction of the members of the Maysville mob who lynched and burned Dick Coleman, the Negro who brutally murdered Mrs. James Lashbrook. The Governor Monday night received a communication from the Ohio anti-lynching society congratulating him on the vigorous fight he has made against mob violence.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Dec. 19, 1899

 

Gov. Taylor Against Mob Rule

Frankfort, Ky., Dec.21

It is said that one of the most vigorous chapters in the forthcoming message of Gov. Taylor will be on lynching and that he will recommend dealings with mobs. The Maysville burning of Dick Coleman will be his text.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Dec. 26, 1899

Lashbrook, Thomas The Winchester Sun,   Fri., 3-4-1921
Lasher, Lowell The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-13-1950
Laskey, James Motion of Francis McDaniel who made oath thereto as the law directs certificate is granted him for obtaining letters of administration on the estate of James Laskey decd. with Isaac Cunningham security.

Order Book 10; P. 64; February Court 1832

 

Order for the appraisal of the slaves if any and personal estate of James Laskey decd.

Order Book 10; P. 63; February Court 1832

Lassanske, Mrs. Joan Margaret

Kurtzweil

The Winchester Sun   Fri., 10-9-1992
Laswell, John Well Digger Killed

And His Assistant Fatally Hurt by a Dynamite Explosion

Elizabethtown, Ky., Dec.22.—News was received here Tuesday afternoon that John Laswell, a well digger, was instantly killed, 20 miles north of this place, and Horace Wathen, his assistant, mortally injured by the explosion of a dynamite blast Tuesday forenoon. They were on a ridge working on the premises of Laswell, who at the time was cutting a piece of red hot iron. When the iron was severed one of the pieces struck the dynamite cartridge, causing an explosion. The fragment of iron was blown through Laswell’s head. Wathen was hit by flying pieces of iron.

The Winchester Democrat Tuesday   December 28, 1897

Latham, Frank Deaths

Mr. Frank Latham, of Mayslick, Ky., died suddenly last week. He was well known in old Baptist circles, and had relatives in this county.

The Sun-Sentinel   Thur., March 30, 1905

Latham, Mrs. Reuben Died in Mason county

Mrs. Reuben Latham died Sunday at her home in Mason county, of the decay incident     to old age. She was the grandmother of Dr. W.L. Gordon, Mrs. Phil Hodgkin, Jr., and Mrs. Gus Hunt, of this city, and county.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, September 2, 1910

Latham, Terry DeLane The Winchester Sun   Tues., 2-16-1988
Latham, Todd W. The Winchester Sun Thur., 9-20, 9-21, 9-22-2007
Latham, William (Lanham) James Sudduth resigned his guardianship accounts of John Latham by letter produced to the court.

Order Book 10; P. 299; July Court 1836

 

John Latham infant orphan of William Latham dec. came personally into court and with the approbation of the court made choice of William Gaitskill as his guardian (James Sudduth former guardian counseling thereto) giving security whereupon he together with Robert W. Smith and Thomas Sudduth entered into and acknowledged their bond in penalty of $2000 conditioned as the law directs.

Order Book 10; P. 299; July Court 1836

 

On motion of John Latham ordered that James Sudduth be summoned to appear here at the next court to show cause if any he has or can say why he should not be fined for not settling accounts of said John Latham and as administrator or William Latham dec.

Order Book 10; P. 312; October Court 1836

 

Ordered that an attachment issue ___ ____ James Sudduth for contempt offense to this court for not settling his administratorship account as the administrator of the estate of William Latham dec. and also as guardian to John Latham infant orphan of said William Latham returnable to the next court.

Order Book 10; P. 377; October Court 1837

 

Settlement with James Sudduth administrator of the estate of William Lanham dec. was produced in court approved and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 10; P. 390; December Court 1837

 

Settlement with James Sudduth late guardian of John Lanham infant orphan of William Lanham dec. was produced in court examined allowed and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 10; P. 390; December Court 1837

Latham, William S. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-6-1991
Lathan, Mrs. Ozetta B. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-18-1991
Lathan, William Ordered that Thomas Wornall be appointed a commissioner to settle and adjust all accounts with James Sudduth administrator of the estate of William Lathan decd. and also to settle with said Sudduth as guardian of John Lathan and make report.

Order Book 10; P. 95; October Court 1832

Lathram, William T. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 2-11-1958
Lathrem, Mrs. Ellen Irene

Murphy

The Winchester Sun   Sat., 9-18-1993
Latimer, John Death Of Mr. Latimer

John Latimer died Saturday morning at the home of his daughter, Mrs. J. Harry Allan, aged eighty-three years. Funeral services were held at the family residence Saturday afternoon by Rev. W. T. McElroy and the remains were taken Sunday to Perryville for interment.

He resided near Perryville until the death of his wife a few years ago, since which time he had lived with his daughter, Mrs. Allan. Besides her, he leaves two sons, one residing at Nevada, Mo., and the other at Nicholasville, this State. The latter was formerly a merchant of this city. A year or two ago he united with the Christian Church and lived a consistent christian life.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Oct. 15, 1901

Laton, Ray P. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-17-1971
Latta, David Ritchie The Winchester Sun   Mon., 6-28-1965
Latta, Mrs. T. W. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 10-15-1969
Lattimer, R. L. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-27-1926
Lattimore, R. L. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 1-20, 1-21, 1-22-1927
Lattrell, Mose The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-14-1938
Laub, Ben Deaths

Ben Laub died at his home in Louisville Friday, aged forty-six years. He was formerly a member of the firm of Laub Bros., of this city.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Oct. 27, 1903

Laub, Henry The Winchester Sun   Tues., 2-9-1926
Lauderman, Mrs. Katherine The Winchester Sun   Sat., 7-2-1955
Lauer, Luis Luis Lauer, a Louisville man who has been insane for twenty-five years, was sent to the asylum Wednesday. When a boy of twelve he was locked in a dark room and by this act reason was dethroned.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday June 22, 1894

Laughlan, F. Sewell’s Shop – Mr. F. Laughlan died Saturday in Mt. Sterling of pneumonia leaving a family of ten children.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, December 16, 1910

Laughlin Family Sketch Of The Laughlin Family.

(By Judge James Flanagan)

In the year 1812 Capt. John W. Laughlin and family moved from Carolina County, Virginia, to Clark county, Kentucky. He had married previous to that time and his family consisted of his wife and eldest son, Col. Henry C. Laughlin who was then an infant of two years of age. He located in the south western part of Clark county, having purchased in that section a farm on which he lived to see the close of his honorable and upright life. He was a man of generous instincts and was much beloved by all who knew him. He was a good, kind neighbor, ever ready to help the needy and deserving and to relieve the sick in his neighborhood. He died regretted by all who knew him.

At his death he left as his widow, Mrs. Lucy Woodson Laughlin, nee Lucy Woodson Chiles, with whom the writer had an acquaintance of many years full of mutual love and friendship. Nothing too good can be said of that sainted mother in Israel. She was a woman of distinguished appearance with a queenly look, and received a good education in one of the best schools in Richmond, Va., and her father was a man of great wealth and owned a number of slaves and much land.

Capt. Laughlin left nine children, viz: Henry C., Ann, Lucy, Mary, Virginia, Tarlton C., Bettie, John W. and Laura.

The eldest daughter, Ann, became the wife of Col. Francis F. Jackson, of Clark county, Ky., both of whom are dead. They left one son, John Henry Jackson and two daughters, Lucy Jackson and Mary Virginia Jackson. John Henry was a soldier in Col. Walter Chenault’s regiment in the Confederate Army, where he served faithfully until the close of the war. After his return from the army he farmed for a while and died without ever having married.

Lucy married Lafayette Green, but soon died leaving no issue.

Mary Virginia married Wm. H. Ecton a thrifty and greatly esteemed merchant of Winchester, Kentucky. He died in 1803 leaving her as a widow, and also three children, viz: Dewees, who is a prominent insurance man in Minneapolis, Annie Jouett, wife of E. S. Jouett, a distinguished attorney of Winchester, Ky., and Laura, who is yet in a state of single blessedness. She is a talented young lady, prominent in all good work in the city and county. Their grandfather, Col. Francis F. Jackson, was a representative man of great energy and industry. He, at one time, represented Clark county in the Lower House of the Kentucky Legislature. He died in the fall of 1861, in his 86th year, full of honor and of esteem of the people of Clark county and wherever else he was known.

Henry C. Laughlin, the eldest child, was born in Caroline county, Virginia, and lived a useful life as a merchant in Winchester, Ky., and in Philadelphia. He died in his ___ year at his home in Winchester, Ky. He was appointed appraiser-at-large for the United States by President Pierce. He was a man of splendid business gifts.

Tarleton C. Laughlin and Ann Hopkins were married in Clark county, Ky., in the year 18__, and settled in Bath county, Kentucky. He died comparatively young, but had made his mark as a successful farmer. He was very popular in both Clark and Bath   counties. He had filled the office of Deputy Sheriff of Clark county with great satisfaction. His early death was much lamented. His wife was a very talented business woman and raised a family that would have been a credit to any parent. Her three sons, Henry, Julian and Tarlton are men of fine talents and have succeeded in life. Henry has been Judge of the ____ Court of Chicago. There, by his ability and patient industry, he amassed a large fortune and is highly esteemed in his adopted home. Her daughter Nannie, married Dr. J. E. Neeley.

Lucy was twice married. The first time to Wm. Snyder, of Paris, Ky., and the second time to Capt. Robert C. Nicholas, a brother of Mrs. Patsy Winn and Dr. Wilson C. Nicholas.

Virginia married Wm. Kemp and they moved to Adams county, Illinois, and lived on their farm up to their death, leaving a large family, who are reported to be doing well.

Mary married Mr. John H. Quisenberry, of Clark county, Ky. She survived him and died at her home near Schottsville, in the year 18__. She was an excellent lady. They had one child, Mr. Henry L. Quisenberry, a prosperous and highly esteemed farmer and business man of Clark county. He married Miss Maude Duckworth and has an attractive family.

Bettie, an exceptionally bright woman married Alexander Julian, of Franklin county, Ky. She died first and he several years later, leaving a number of children, who have done well in life. One of them is an able lawyer, Henry S. Julian, residing in Kansas City, Missouri, where he has obtained an attractive patronage by his ability and fidelity in his profession. The other children have all succeeded in life.

John William was the youngest son. He worked as a young man on the family farm and for others, but when that was sold he came with his mother and three sisters to Winchester, Ky., and became a merchant. During his residence in Winchester he was appointed post master at that place, which office he held with general satisfaction for a term of years. At the close of the Civil War he and his family moved to Missouri where they each died leaving several children.

The last child was Laura, who became the wife of William Flanagan, one of the most remarkable men the County of Clark has ever produced.

He was a man of brilliant talent.

He was twice postmaster at Winchester and was also County Surveyor for fourteen years. He was a civil engineer by profession. He was born a mathematician and possessed phenomenal memory.

He was a man of great integrity and was much esteemed for his honorable and manly life. He was a graduate of West Point where he was a classmate of Gen. R. E. Lee, Joseph E. Johnson, Jefferson Davis and others, who became distinguished as soldiers and in the business walks of life. He died on September 1st, 1851, leaving a widow, Mrs. Laura Flanagan, and a daughter, Mrs. Ruth Hall, both of whom live together now in Lexington, Kentucky. He left his wife and child in comfortable pecuniary condition. His death was considered a public loss.

The dwelling in which Captain Laughlin and his family resided is still in tact. The original part of it was built of stone with post holes, the supposition being that it was thus constructed to defend its occupants from the attacks of the Indians, who had not all left the “dark and bloody ground” whither they still came on their hunting expeditions. Capt. Laughlin added to the original stone building.

Very many of those named in this hurried sketch have passed over the river.

Peace to the ashes of the dead, and good will to the survivors and descendants of the Laughlin family.

The Sun-Sentinel, Thursday, November 2, 1905

Laughlin John On motion of Henry C. Laughlin who made oath thereto as the law directs certificate is granted him for obtaining letters of administration on the estate of John Laughlin dec. in due form giving security whereupon he together with G. B. Camplin, William H. Lindsey entered into and acknowledged their bond in penalty of $3000 conditioned as the law directs.

Order Book 10; P. 470; May Court 1839

 

Ordered that Caleb Parish George Baker Samuel W. Chiles and Henry T. Chiles or any 3 of them being first sworn do appraise in current money the slaves and personal estate of John Laughlin dec. and make report thereof to the court.

Order Book 10; P. 470; May Court 1839

 

Elizabeth Laughlin infant orphan of John Laughlin dec. came personally into court and with   the approbation of the court made choice of Francis F. Jackson as guardian of her estate giving security whereupon he together with John W. Laughlin and Tarlton Laughlin entered into and acknowledged their bond in the penalty of $500 conditioned as the law directs.

Order Book 11; P. 441; August Court 1846

 

Laura Laughlin infant orphan of John Laughlin dec. came personally into court and with the approbation of the court made choice of Francis F. Jackson as guardian of her estate giving security whereupon he together with John W. Laughlin and Tarlton Laughlin entered into and acknowledged their bond in the penalty of $500 conditioned as the law directs.

Order Book 11; P. 441; August Court 1846

Laughlin, ______ V. W. Bush guardian and co. on Petition

Sale by commissioner Flanagan of the undivided interest of the infants Sally and Anna Nicholas and of Henry D., Nancy W., Julian and Tarlton B. Laughlin in the house and lot named…..make deed…cause continued.

Order Book 13; P. 77; November Court 1867

 

V. W. Bush guardian & co. on petition

Ann Laughlin & co. on petition

Report of sale of their respective wards Anna & Sally Nicholas & Henry D. Laughlin, Julian Laughlin, Nancy W. Laughlin & Tarlton B. Laughlin in the parcel of land….reported and confirmed.

Order Book 13; P. 316; November Court 1868

 

V. W. Bush guardian of Sally & Anna Nicholas

Anna Laughlin guardian of Henry D. Locknane & co. (written Locknane should be Laughlin)

Acknowledged deeds to Wright N. West & James Flanagan…commissioner to be paid…

Order Book 13; P. 344; November Court 1868

Laughlin, F. C. Ann C. Laughlin Gdn. On Petition

……… on her motion ordered that Gilkerson Rippy, Harrison Thomson & S. B. Grigsby be appointed commissioners to ascertain value of real and personal estate of infant petitioners ………house and grounds be sold ……….John H. Quisenberry appointed commissioner to execute this sale. A. H. Buckner convey to purchaser a deed of conveyance ………..

Order Book 10; P. 368; May Court 1860

 

Ann C. Laughlin Gdn. On Petition ………Equity

The report of the Commissioner John H. Quisenberry filed ………now noted.

Order Book 10; P. 427; November Court 1860

 

Ann C. Laughlin On Petition

Ordered that these causes be submitted to the court.

Order Book 10; P. 439; November Court 1860

Laughlin, J. W. J. W. Laughlin, a native of this county, an for many yeas postmaster of this city, died at his home at Mexico, Mo., recently, aged 88 years. He was an uncle of Mrs. W. H. Ecton, of this city.

The Democrat, Wednesday, March 19, 1890.

Laughlin, Mrs. Belle Mrs. Belle Lauglin Some More.

A dispatch from Dayton, Ohio, says: “A woman who gave the name of Mrs. Belle Laughlin, age forty-two and a widow, and her home at Lexington, was found at a street corner Monday afternoon apparently suffering from an overdose of morphine. The attending physician said that the woman was manifestly addicted to the use of the drug. She was sent to the hospital.” The woman was raised in this county and is a stepdaughter of the man Williams who was murdered and thrown into a pond near this city, presumably by members of his own family. Mrs. Laughlin was once a beautiful woman, but has fallen about as low as it is possible for a woman to get.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, June 23, 1899.

Laughlin, Mrs. E.M. Mrs. E.M. Laughlin, of Shrieveport, LA., died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. F.C. Wheeler, in this city, Monday morning, at 10 o’clock. Mrs. Laughlin was 66 years of age. She had only been in Winchester about 2 months, having come to visit her daughter. She had been in declining health for some time, but had only been seriously ill about two weeks. The funeral services will be held at the residence of her daughter, Tuesday morning at 7 o’clock, conducted by Rev. William Cumming, of the Presbyterian church. The body will be taken on the early morning train to Shrieveport for burial.

The Winchester News   Monday, October 19, 1908

 

Deaths and Funerals

The body of Mrs. E.M. Laughlin, who died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. F.C. Wheeler, in this city Monday was taken to her old home in Shreveport, La., Tuesday morning for burial. The body will be taken to Lexington over the C & O and then transferred to the Southern for Shreveport, La.

The Winchester News   Tuesday, October 20, 1908

 

Death of Mrs. Laughlin

Mrs. E.M. Laughlin, of Shreveport, La., had been the guest of her daughter, Mrs. F. Clay Wheeler, of this city for some time. For some time she had been in bad health which culminated in her death Monday morning at the age of 66 years. The funeral services were conducted at the family residence Tuesday morning by Rev. Wm. Cumming, and the remains were taken to her southern home for burial. Mrs. Laughlin had been a life-long member of the Methodist church south. She leaves a husband, Major E.M. Laughlin, and three children, Mrs. F. Clay Wheeler, of this city; Mrs. Laura K. Ridley, of Shreveport, and Mr. John Cobb Ridley, of Kirbyville, Texas. Mr. and Mrs. Wheeler accompanied Mrs. Ridley and Mr. J.C. Ridley to Lexington with the remains and the burial took place at Shreveport yesterday.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, October 23, 1908

Laughlin, Mrs. Frank C. The Winchester Sun Thur., 7-31-1913
Laughlin, Mrs. Hannah B. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 1-15-1963
Laughlin, Mrs. Jewel Owens The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-19-1986
Laughlin, Preston Farmer Found Dead

Preston Laughlin, who lives on the Paris pike five or six miles from town, is dead as the result of a bullet from a pistol. About three o’clock yesterday morning he went out into the yard and shortly after a pistol shot was heard. On going out the family found him dead with a pistol by his side. Coroner Brineger went out to investigate the matter and had not returned at the hour of going to press. Whether the bullet was fired from his own pistol or another, and whether it was an accident or suicide was not known at the hour. He was about forty years old, a good citizen and leaves a wife and one child.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Feb. 16, 1906

 

Death of Preston Laughlin

When the Democrat went to press Thursday afternoon various rumors were afloat as to the cause of the death of Preston Laughlin and although much care was exercised the account was in many respects incorrect. The wood pile of his residence where he was found is in plain view of the pike and Mr. W.O. Florence in passing along the road Thursday morning saw the body and recognized that something was wrong. On examination the body was found to be frozen stiff and had evidently been dead for some time. His family had been absent for some days visiting in Pendleton county and he was at home alone. From all indications he had gone out Tuesday evening to split some kinding when his pistol fell from a holster and was discharged the bullet striking him in the body killing him instantly, and the body had remained where it had fallen from that time until found Thursday morning. When the body was raised the pistol was found under him with one load discharged. Coroner Brinegar was summoned and held and inquest with the following jury: Harry B. Clay, Enoch Kindred, C. C. Kimbrell, Ben McDonald, A.T. Edwards and John D. Osborne, who returned a verdict of accidental death. The remains were brought to this city and buried in the local cemetery Friday afternoon under the auspices of Ivanhoe Lodge, No. 48 Knights of Pythias, to which he belonged. He was a native of Nicholas county, but had lived here for several years. He was a good citizen with many friends, and his untimely death is much regretted.

The Winchester Democrat Tuesday, February 20, 1906

Laughlin, Robt. Laughlin’s Neck Broken

Robt. Laughlin was hung at Brooksville, Bracken county, Saturday morning, in the presence of fifteen hundred spectators. The usual enclosure, forty feet square, had been put up to hide the execution from the public but the immense crowd tore it down and had an unobstructed view of the hanging. Laughlin murdered his wife and niece, after outraging the latter and then poured coal oil over the bodies and burned them. It was one of the most horrible crimes ever committed in Kentucky.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, January 12, 1897

Laughlin, Sarah Emma

 

The inquest

Verdict charges Laughlin with murder, criminal assault and arson

Augusta, Ky., Feb. 20 – The coroner’s jury convened in the mayor’s office at ten o’clock. The coroner examined several witnesses Wednesday morning. Marshal Sayers was at Maysville Tuesday night, returning here early Wednesday morning. Several of the officials of the Maysville jail have been here in attendance at the inquest. The examination of Edward Fitzgerald, the Chesapeake and Ohio detective, and Arthur Pumpelly, turnkey in the Maysville jail, corroborated the statements of Marshal Sayers and other witnesses in regard to the published confession of Robert Laughlin. The jury returned the following verdict: “We the jury believe, from all the evidence in the case, that Sarah E. Laughlin and May Jones came to their death by an iron poker in the hands of Robert Laughlin and that he ravished May Jones and burned the bodies within the house.”

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, February 21, 1896

 

Four indictments against the Bracken county fiend

Thursday, the Bracken county grand jury returned four indictments against Robert H. Laughlin. One charges him with the murder of his wife, Emma Laughlin; the second with the murder of Mary Jones, his eleven-year old niece; the third with assaulting his niece and the fourth with having set fire to a dwelling house. Laughlin will hardly be tried until the next term of court.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, March 17, 1896

Laughton, Wallace Bruce The Winchester Sun   Sat., 10-26-1935
Lauhon, L. B. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 3-19-1930
Laulhart, Joseph L. Doctor Overcome By The Severe Cold

Wildie, Ky., Feb. 16

Intelligence was received Tuesday of the death by freezing of Dr. Joseph L. Laulhart, of Rock Lick.   He was visiting his patients Sunday night, and was overcome by the severe cold and died.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Feb. 21, 1899

Laurel, Sally On motion of John Couchman ordered that Frederick Couchman be summoned to appear here at the next court to show cause if why he has or can say why he should not give security as being the guardian of the infant heirs of Sally Laurel dec.

Order Book 10; P. 220; January Court 1835

Laurence, Henry The Last Will and Testament was proven by oath and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 10; P. 57; November Court 1831

 

Motion of Meridath Laurence and Robert Laurence executors certificate is granted them for obtaining probate.

Order Book 10; P. 57; November Court 1831

 

Order for the appraisal of the slaves if any and personal estate of Henry Laurence decd.

Order Book 10; P. 57; November Court 1831

 

Inventory and appraisal of the estate of Henry Laurence decd. ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 10; P. 63; January Court 1832

 

Amount of the sales of the estate of Henry Laurence decd. ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 10; P. 63; January Court 1832

 

Ordered that Allen H. Cocks, George Burk, David Hampton, and William Tuttle do settle and adjust all accounts with Meredith Laurence and Robert Laurence executors of the estate of Henry Laurence decd. and make report.

Order Book 10; P. 111; February Court 1833

Laustman, Charles The Winchester Sun   Sat., 9-13-1913
Lavell, Lina                           AA The Winchester Sun   Tues., 3-6-1928
Lavelle, Mrs. Eva Lee The Winchester Sun   Wed., 9-2-1953
Lavengood, Mrs. Nancy The Winchester Sun   Fri., 8-3, 8-4-1934
Laverty, Henry S. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-27-1972
Laverty, James Bard The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-25-1995
Laverty, James Bryan The Winchester Sun   Mon., 7-20, 7-21-1970
Laverty, James D. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 7-21-1992
Laverty, John Jr. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-20, 9-21-1971
Laverty, Mrs. Betty Mitchell The Winchester Sun   Tues., 10-31-1989
Laverty, Mrs. Jeanne The Winchester Sun   Fri., 2-3-1956
Laverty, Mrs. Sylvia M. The Winchester Sun Wed., 2-11-2009
Lavery, Merle Murphey The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-12-2001

Lavin, infant child

Bourbon; Died of whooping cough, infant child of Barney Lavin.

The Democrat   Wednesday, May 8, 1889

Lavin, Jack Jack Lavin, a Paris painter, went into the county one day last week to do some work, but did not obtain it and started home. The next morning he was found by the roadside frozen to death.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, February 7, 1894

Lavin, Margaret Chilesburg and Athens – Margaret, the five year old daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Wm. Lavin died Tuesday morning. The burial took place in the family lot in the Catholic cemetery Tuesday afternoon.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, March 22, 1910

Lavin, William The Winchester Sun   Tues., 5-9-1922
Law, Benedict W. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 2-21-1924
Law, Chas.                             AA Touched A Live Wire

Frankfort, Ky., June 27

Chas. Law, of Lexington, a colored lineman, was killed by falling on a live fire alarm wire, while repairing telephone lines.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., July 4, 1899

Law, Marah LEWIS MESSER, shot and killed Marah Law, in Leslie county.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, August 17, 1897.

Lawell, Milton M. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-5, 5-6-1969
Lawell, Mrs. Evalyn The Winchester Sun   Tues., 9-14, 9-15-1982
Lawell, Mrs. Jennie The Winchester Sun   Sat., 1-10-1925
Lawerance, Richard The Winchester Sun Tues., 8-11-1981
Lawhorn, G. A. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 1-16-1917
Lawhorn, George The Winchester Sun   Thur., 12-18-1930
Lawhorn, John B. John B. Lawhorn, of Carter county, died last week aged ninety-eight years. He had been a minister of the gospel for over seventy years.

The Democrat, Wednesday, March 2, 1892.

Lawhorn, Zelma The Winchester Sun Tues., 3-18-1913
Lawing, Mrs. Margaret Grace The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-4, 5-5-2009
Lawing, Mrs. Rittie Lillian Pyatt The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-18-1977
Lawler, Mrs. Margaret Furlong The Winchester Sun   Sat., 9-29-1934
Lawless, Mrs. Jim Wife Dropped Dead

Columbia, Ky., Oct. 2

While under the influence of whisky, Sam Taylor, Zola Blair and Will Blair, three Adair county men, went to the grocery of Jim Lawless, in Russell county, and ordered oysters. After eating them Blair quarreled with Lawless about the price. Lawless started to his house near by. The men followed. Mrs. Lawless, who was in the house, thinking her husband was in danger of being killed, ran out of the house and dropped dead in the yard.   Officers are after the men.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Oct. 9, 1900

Lawless, Mrs. Mary Love Was Lincoln’s Sweetheart

Lexington, Ky., July 25

Mrs. Mary Love Lawless died here Sunday in the 82 year of her age. She was a sweetheart of Abraham Lincoln and a reigning bell of her day. Her maiden name was Joplin and her home was at Mt. Vernon, Ky. Her husband was James R. Lawless, a Mexican war veteran.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Aug., 1,1899

Lawless, Oscar A Knotty Case

The Bourbon Circuit Court has a knotty problem to solve. Oscar Lawless married Mamie C. Tune, of Carlisle, and lived with her two or three years and left her, returning to his home in Paris. Later, without securing a divorce, he married Lula Hipshire, of Fayette. A short time ago he died, leaving considerable estate. Both his wives claim to be his lawful heirs. His last wife had never before heard of his having been married, but the records show otherwise. Mrs. Lawless, first and second, are of respectable families and the case is attracting considerable attention.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., March 29, 1901

Lawrence Family The Winchester Sun Tues., 4-30-1912
Lawrence, Mrs. Mary Burruss The Winchester Sun   Tues., 11-12, 11-13-1963
Lawrence, ___________ A.W. T. Lawrence was summonded to Cincinnati Wednesday by the sudden death of his father. The deceased was a prominent commission merchant of the Queen City.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., March 29, 1901

Lawrence, A. J. Died—Dr. A. J. Lawrence, formerly of this county, where he has numerous relatives, died last week at the home of his son near Gallatin, Mo.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, September 3, 1897

Lawrence, Achilles

Died, June 18th, of consumption, Achilles Lawrence, aged about 38 years. Funeral services conducted by Eld. J. W. Harding.   He was for many years a soldier in the regular army.

The Winchester Democrat     Wed., 6-20-1888

 

A pension was this week allowed to the widow of Achilles Lawrence, who died of consumption contracted while serving in the regular army.

The Democrat   Wednesday May 22, 1889

 

On Saturday J. Milton Lawrence was married to Mrs. Minerva Lawrence, the widow of the groom’s brother Achilles Lawrence.

The Winchester Democrat; Wednesday, September 17, 1890

Lawrence, C. B. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 6-8-1927
Lawrence, C. H. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 4-4-1925
Lawrence, Charles The Winchester Sun   Tues., 11-11, 11-12, 11-14-1924
Lawrence, Charles Kenneth

(Teaberry)

The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-3-1960
Lawrence, Clarence Vernon The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-23, 11-24-1959
Lawrence, Clark Died

Clark, the four-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Lawrence died Wednesday morning at their home on Winn Avenue of meningitis. Funeral at the residence by Eld. J. W. Harding and burial in the family graveyard on Four Mile. This is an afflicted family. The father’s mind is hopelessly affected and the death of a grown daughter is hourly expected.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Nov. 23, 1900

Lawrence, Claude The Winchester Sun   Thur., 4-29-1971
Lawrence, Dallas G. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-24-1984
Lawrence, David The Winchester Sun     Sat., 7-23, 9-3, 9-5, 9-6-1932
Lawrence, David The Winchester Sun   Mon., 1-4-1982
Lawrence, Edward (Teaberry) The Winchester Sun   Sat., 11-11-1989
Lawrence, Egbert H. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 11-29-1980
Lawrence, Elliott W. Age 4, male, he was born in Clark County, KY, he lived in Clark County, KY, he died in Clark County, KY, he died August 23, 1855 of scarlet fever.

CCKD

Lawrence, Elmer The Winchester Sun   Mon., 7-13, 7-14-1959
Lawrence, Emma Death Of Miss Lawrence

Miss Emma Lawrence, daughter of the late Achilles Lawrence, died yesterday at her home in the suburbs of this city of typhoid fever, aged nineteen years.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., July 14, 1903

 

The funeral of Miss Emma Lawrence, who died Monday in this city, of typhoid fever, was preached Tuesday at the family residence by Revs. T. Q. Martin and J. A. Francis and the remains were taken to the family graveyard of Theudas Dykes near Boonesboro for interment.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., July 17, 1903

Lawrence, Ennis West Bend; Died- At Corydon, Ky., August 19th of inflammation of the stomach, Ennis Lawrence aged 55 years. He had many relatives in Clark county.

The Winchester Democrat     Wednesday 8-27-1890

Lawrence, Grover Merideth The Winchester Sun   Tues., 9-5-1972
Lawrence, Henry Thomas B. Lawrence vs. Jonathan Trowbridge

….the land of which Henry Lawrence died seized and possessed on which the dwelling house in which said decedent lived at his death, is situated and adjoins the lands of William Reese defendant Trowbridge and the heirs of Merideth Lawrence decd….

Order Book 18; P. 70; November Court 1881

 

Thomas B. Lawrence vs. Jonathan Trowbridge

….the land of which Henry Lawrence died seized and possessed on which the dwelling house in which said decedent lived at his death, is situated and adjoins the lands of William Reese and the heirs of Merideth Lawrence decd….shall be sold… purchase money payable to defendant Trowbridge…

Order Book 18; P. 544 May Court 1884

 

Jonathan Trowbridge vs. George M. Taylor & co.

…..money for the tract of land…..undivided interest in the lands of Henry Lawrence deceased….cause filled away.

Order Book 19; P. 44; May Court 1885

Lawrence, Henry (Laurence) Ordered that the sheriff of this county pay unto Henry Lawrence the sum of $3 out of money from October court last.

Order Book 10; P. 174; April Court 1834

 

The last will and testament of Henry Lawrence dec. was produced in open court and proven according to law by the oaths of James P. Bullock and James W. Bullock witnesses thereto subscribed and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 11; P. 130; April Court 1842

 

On the motion of George W. Lawrence and Robert Lawrence executors named in the last will and testament of Henry Lawrence dec. who made oath thereto as the law directs certificate is granted them for obtaining a probate thereof in due form giving security whereupon they together with Thomas Ecton and John Watts entered into and acknowledged their bond in the penalty of $1000 conditioned as the law directs.

Order Book 11; P. 130; April Court 1842

 

Ordered that William Adams, William Bledsoe, Jonathan Baker and Eli Bruce or any three of them being first sworn do appraise in current money the slaves if any and personal estate of Henry Lawrence dec. and make report thereof to the court.

Order Book 11; P. 131; April Court 1842

 

Inventory and appraisement of the estate of Henry Lawrence dec. was produced in court examined allowed and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 11; P. 149; August Court 1842

 

Amount of sales of the estate of Henry Lawrence dec. was produced in court examined allowed and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 11; P. 150; August Court 1842

 

Settlement with Robert Laurence and George W. Laurence executors of Henry Laurence dec. was produced in court and ordered to be filed until next court.

Order Book 11; P. 363; July Court 1845

 

Settlement with the executors of Henry Laurence dec. being filed at last court was again produced in court approved of and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 11; P. 368; August Court 1845

Lawrence, Herbert The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-5-1924
Lawrence, Howard A. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-12-1979
Lawrence, infant daughter DEATHS   Thursday, infant daughter of John Lawrence, who lives new this city, known farmers and traders of Bourbon county, died Monday night.

The Democrat, Wednesday, November 25, 1891.

Lawrence, J. J. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 1-10, 1-11-1947
Lawrence, James A Rash Act

James Lawrence Cuts His Own Throat With a Razor

Wednesday Morning James Lawrence committed suicide at his home on P. L. Skinner’s place near Tanner’s Store on the Mt. Sterling pike.

He had been absent from the house for some time and on going to the barn he was found with his throat cut and a bloody razor clasped in his hand. He was not dead when found but was unable to speak.

His family relations were pleasant, his financial affairs all right and the only cause that could be assigned is temporary insanity caused by religious hallucination. A year or more ago he became infatuated with the ideas of the Sanctificationists and   since that time he has brooded over the wickedness of the world until he had grown morbid.

He was forty-four years old and leaves a wife and several children. His wife was formerly Miss Laura Glover. He was a son of Thomas Lawrence and his mother was a sister of Ben H. Jones, Mrs. John Adams of this city and others. He was a splendid tobacco man and had just sold a crop of sixteen thousand pounds at ten cents per pound.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, May 3, 1895

 

Tanner’s Store

The report that Jas. Lawrence committed suicide. Wednesday was not entirely true. He made the attempt and cut his throat badly with a razor, but he did not die and is now doing well. He is honest, conscientious and sober, but brooded over religious matters until his mind became unbalanced. He still refuses to take medicine but is getting along nicely.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, May 7, 1895

 

Jas. Lawrence, who on June 2d attempted suicide by cutting his throat with a razor, has become violently insane and was taken to the asylum at Lexington Tuesday.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, May 31, 1895

 

Jas. Lawrence was tried Tuesday on a writ of lunacy he was adjudged insane and ordered sent to the asylum. He was a peaceable, prosperous farmer until he became imbued with the doctrines of sanctification when his disposition underwent a complete change. He became morose, moody and despondent and some weeks ago was   found in his stable with his throat cut and a bloody razor by his side. Although desperately wounded he recovered, but his mind has grown worse until his family were afraid of him.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, May 31, 1895

Lawrence, James Died—James Lawrence, the three year-old-son of Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Lawrence, died at the family residence near Tanner’s store Tuesday night of croup. Burial yesterday in the old Lawrence graveyard on the Muddy creek pike.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, July 29, 1898

 

Died—The infant son of J. B. Lawrence died last Tuesday of membranous croup and was buried at the old Lawrence graveyard on four Mile. Scarcely was this child buried when the dread disease attacked another child in the same family, the infant child of French Dunn who married a daughter of Mr. Lawrence and who lived with them The attack was fatal and in a few hours the little one was laid to rest in the same burial ground. The family are greatly grieved and fears are entertained for the sanity of Mr. Lawrence, whose mind has given way once before and who attempted suicide.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, August 2, 1898

Lawrence, James B. Death Of J. B. Lawrence

James B. Lawrence died Sunday at his home on Main Street, after a long illness of consumption, aged fifty-three years. The funeral was held at his home yesterday afternoon by Elds. Harding and Lowry, and the remains were buried in the old Lawrence graveyard on the Muddy Creek pike.   He leaves a wife, formerly Miss Glover, and six daughters, nearly all of them grown. Mr. Lawrence was a man of fine christian character and was highly respected.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Feb. 6, 1906

Lawrence, James M. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 12-12-1968
Lawrence, James Madison The Winchester Sun Tues., 3-26, 4-30-1912
Lawrence, James T. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 8-3-1927
Lawrence, James W. The Winchester   Sun   Thur., 4-27, 4-28-1933
Lawrence, James W. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 5-12-1936
Lawrence, Jerry Wilson The Winchester Sun   Tues., 6-22-1976
Lawrence, Jesse M. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 6-25-1998
Lawrence, John Three Killed Near Mt. Vernon, Ky. – Mt. Vernon, Ky., Nov. 3 – A number of tough characters created a disturbance at the Crooked Creek precinct in this county Tuesday afternoon.   Sheriff Mullins attempted to restore order when a general shooting affray took place between the sheriff and his deputies and the disturbers, three of the latter being killed. The dead are Henry Langford, John Lawrence and Charles Payne.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday November 9, 1897

Lawrence, John Henry The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-6-1925
Lawrence, John W. (Uncle John) The Winchester Sun   Thur., 7-11-1940
Lawrence, Lillie Pearl The Winchester Sun   Sat., 12-17-1960
Lawrence, Lowell M. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 6-29, 6-30-1964
Lawrence, M. Wilson The Winchester Sun   Tues., 9-17-1929
Lawrence, Maggie Died

Miss Maggie Lawrence, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Lawrence, of this city, died Friday of consumption, aged about twenty years. The funeral was preached by Rev. George Froh and the remains were interred in the family burying ground on Four Mile. This was the second death to occur in the family in less than a week.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Nov. 30, 1900

Lawrence, Marsh TO HANG

The Death Penalty Given to Dillard Rainey.

The Murder of Aaron Adams to Be Avenged. The Majesty of the Law Vindicated.

Not in a spirit of vengeance; not with an outburst of wrath nor with the savage senselessness of mob violence; but with the calm, dignified majesty of the law has the blood of Aaron Adams, which cries from the ground, been avenged, or will be when the sentence of the law is executed. A thrill of horror went through our people when the causeless, cruel murder was committed, and when the news spread Saturday that the death penalty had been awarded the murderer, there was a verdict of assent almost universal, and the only regret was that Matt Rainey, the prisoner’s father, did not receive the same sentence.

The crime was a most atrocious one, and with no mitigating circumstances. Matt Rainey and James Henry had differences concerning a piece of land near the mouth of Upper Howard’s Creek, and Henry had placed Frank Haggard in possession as a tenant. Rainey hauled the fence from around Haggard’s garden leaving it open to the stock. Haggard hauled the rails back again and a quarrel on the 13th of last May in which Rainey shot Haggard inflicting a wound that it was thought would prove fatal.   Mrs. Haggard saw Aaron Adams passing along the road and asked him to go for a doctor. Adams went after Dr. T. S. Allen, who lived near, and returning with the physician half an hour later, he was met by Matt Rainey and Dillard Rainey, father and son. Matt was armed with a gun and Dillard with a pistol. The former raised his gun to shoot Adams, but was prevented by Dr. Allan.   With an oath he told his son to shoot and the latter did so. As Adams sank down pierced with a number of balls, Matt Rainey savagely tried again to shoot him.

Deputy Sheriff Eperson was in the neighborhood and arrested Matt Rainey at once. Dillard escaped, although the officers once got close enough to shoot at him. He went through the mountains and was finally arrested at Roanoke, Va., under an assumed name. Matt Rainey was tried last fall and got a life sentence. He took an appeal and since has been in jail here. Two or three feeble attempts were made to mob him here last Spring but they lacked leadership. Since he has been in jail he has incurred the ill-will of the officers and fellow prisoners all whom concur in saying he is the meanest man with whom they have ever had dealings.

The trial of Dillard Rainey began last Tuesday. The evidence closed Thursday at noon and was argued until the next morning when it was given to the jury, which brought in a verdict of guilty and fixing the death penalty the next day. When the prisoner heard it he turned deathly pale and seemed almost overcome. He soon recovered and was taken back to jail cursing the jury and vowing that he would never be hung. Neither of the prisoners have ever shown any remorse for the poor widow and the six helpless children.

This will make the second sentence pronounced by Judge Scott, the other being the negro Will Taylor, who was hung for the murder of Squire Doty, in Madison county a year or two ago.

If Rainey is hung it will make the fourth legal hanging in the county, and the first white man to be hung.

Many years ago Jesse Winn, a negro, was hung near where Col. R. N. Winn’s residence now stands, for the murder of Wm. Emerson, a white man, who owned him or had him hired.

In August, 1839, a young negro named Knight was hung on the Lexington pike near F. H. Dudley’s. He belonged to Mr. Morris who lived on Stoner and had committed a rape on a little white girl.

In April, 1841, a negro man, belonging to Daniel Spar, broke into a house and disemboweled his wife.   The latter got well, but the negro was hung for housebreaking. The negro woman belonged to Geo. Anderson and her assailant was hung near the far end of the C. and O. trestle on the side of Poynterville.

In November, 1850, Thomas Nichols killed his master, Fred B. Nichols, at a rock quarry on the Lexington pike. He was hung about Christmas of the same year. The late Wm. Simpson was Sheriff at the time, and not liking the job of hanging the negro, he employed Marsh Lawrence to tie the rope. A year or two later Marsh Lawrence was killed by his brother, Jack Lawrence. The latter fled to Missouri, but was caught, brought back and sentenced to be hung. He was the first white man in the county to receive the death sentence, but was finally pardoned by Gov. Powell.

About seventeen years ago, Ben. Plunkett was lynched, being hung to a tree in the Courthouse yard, the charge being an attempt assault on Miss Annie Ball, now Mrs. Bradford. In the fall of 1895 Bob Haggard was hung from the bridge on the Muddy Creek pike for a similar assault on Miss Elkin of near Ford.

No motion has yet been made for a new trial, but this will be done.

Since the death penalty has been given to Dillard, his father says he does not wish a new trial, but is inclined to accept the life sentence given him last fall. The general opinion is that if he should secure a new trial he would also be hung.

The Winchester Democrat.   Tuesday, February 16, 1897.

Lawrence, Matt Aged man paralyzed

Matt Lawrence, who lives in this county, was totally paralyzed and at last accounts         was unconscious. Owing to his advanced aged, ninety-three years, there is but little     hope for his recovery.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, December 25, 1908

Lawrence, Meredith On Tuesday, March 12th, 1872, at his residence in Clark county, Ky., Meredith Lawrence Esq., in the85th year of his age.

Clark County Democrat   Thur., 3-21-1872

 

Ben W. Wills has executed bond as administrator of the estate with will annexed of Meredith Lawrence; dec’d with Burgess Ecton as surety.

The Semi-Weekly Sun     Fri., 1-28-1879

 

Will Book 1, Page 226

Dated: September 13, 1971

Recorded: March 25, 1872

Lawrence, Merideth Thomas B. Lawrence vs. Jonathan Trowbridge

….the land of which Henry Lawrence died seized and possessed on which the dwelling house in which said decedent lived at his death, is situated and adjoins the lands of William Reese defendant Trowbridge and the heirs of Merideth Lawrence decd….

Order Book 18; P. 70; November Court 1881

 

Thomas B. Lawrence vs. Jonathan Trowbridge

….the land of which Henry Lawrence died seized and possessed on which the dwelling house in which said decedent lived at his death, is situated and adjoins the lands of William Reese and the heirs of Merideth Lawrence decd….shall be sold…purchase money payable to defendant Trowbridge…

Order Book 18; P. 544 May Court 1884

Lawrence, Michael F. The Winchester Sun Tues., 2-24, 2-25-2009
Lawrence, Milt The Winchester Sun Wed., 3-19-1913
Lawrence, Milton The Winchester Sun   Thur., 7-5-1945
Lawrence, Mrs. A. W. T. Death Of Mrs. Lawrence

A.W. T. Lawrence and his wife are remembered by many of our citizens. Lawrence did business on North Main street. He and his wife lived in style and dressed extravagantly.

After leaving here they went to St. Louis where Lawrence was guilty of embezzlement and is now serving a term in the Missouri penitentiary. Mrs. Lawrence became a nervous wreck over the disgrace of her husband and returned to her former home in Cincinnati where last week she died.

The Sun-Sentinel   Thur., Aug. 4, 1904

Lawrence, Mrs. Ann Veness The Winchester Sun   Thur., 2-7, 2-8, 2-9-2008
Lawrence, Mrs. Annie Garrett The Winchester Sun   Tues., 3-30-1948
Lawrence, Mrs. Anzia Adams The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-15-1994
Lawrence, Mrs. Aquilla Died

Mrs. Aquilla Lawrence died yesterday at her home on Court street after a long illness.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Feb. 15, 1901

Lawrence, Mrs. Betty The Winchester Sun   Wed., 3-23-1938
Lawrence, Mrs. Betty C. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 1-4-1995
Lawrence, Mrs. Desdemona Death of Mrs. Lawrence.

Mrs. Desdemona Lawrence died Tuesday at her home in Lexington, aged twenty-four years. She had been ill for some time and her death was not unexpected. She was the wife of John W. Lawrence, late of this county and was a highly respected Christian lady.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, May 9, 1902

Lawrence, Mrs. Deward Died-At her home on the 15th inst., of consumption, Mrs. Deward Lawrence. The funeral was preached at the Ecton Schoolhouse by M. P. Lowry. Interment in the family burying ground.

The Democrat, Wednesday, April 27, 1892.

Lawrence, Mrs. Elizabeth Williamstown – Mrs. Elizabeth Lawrence, 76 years old, known throughout Kentucky   and Indiana as an advocate of Christian Science, was found dead in a bathtub at the Linden hotel, Indianapolis. Indications point to suicide.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, September 16, 1910

Lawrence, Mrs. Ellen Death of Mrs. Lawrence

For some time an epidemic of dysentery has prevailed in the town of Corydon, Ky., and a large number of deaths has resulted. One of them was that of Mrs. Ellen Lawrence, widow of Ennis Lawrence, and the eldest sister of Dr. I.A. Shirley, of this city, who attended the funeral at that place yesterday.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, July 21, 1908

Lawrence, Mrs. Iva Goodnight The Winchester Sun   Thur., 11-9-1939
Lawrence, Mrs. J. T. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 1-7, 1-8-1931
Lawrence, Mrs. Kate Brock The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-9-1940
Lawrence, Mrs. Lela The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-18-1954
Lawrence, Mrs. Lena Watts The Winchester Sun   Tues., 3-1-1955
Lawrence, Mrs. Margaret The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-19, 11-20-2004

Scobee Funeral Home Web Site 11-18-2004

Lawrence, Mrs. Martha A. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 10-12-1921
Lawrence, Mrs. May The Winchester Sun   Tues., 8-18, 8-21-1925
Lawrence, Mrs. Mildred G. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 8-27-1999
Lawrence, Mrs. Minervia The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-13-1944
Lawrence, Mrs. Mollie The Winchester Sun   Tues., 3-11-1919
Lawrence, Mrs. Nancy Pleasureville Items-Mrs. Nancy Lawrence, who died last week, is the third one of the family who have died since Christmas.

The Semi-Weekly Sun     Tue., 4-8-1879

 

Pleasurville Items

The sale of Mrs. Nancy Lawrence, dec’d., which took place Saturday was well attended. Property of all kinds sold tolerably well, taking everything into consideration.

The Semi-Weekly Sun     Fri., 5-25-1879

Lawrence, Mrs. Nola Morris The Winchester Sun   Tues., 6-14-1988
Lawrence, Mrs. Robert M. Death of Mrs. Lawrence

Mrs. Robert M. Lawrence died Wednesday, November 11th, at Huntsville, Mo., aged about sixty years. She was the second wife of Mr. Lawrence who was raised in this county, but who went to Missouri many years ago.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, November 13, 1908

Lawrence, Mrs. Sarah E. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 11-7-1925
Lawrence, Mrs. William The Winchester Sun   Thur., 6-23-1921
Lawrence, O. S. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 6-17-1920
Lawrence, Ora DEATHS     Saturday, of consumption, Miss Ora Lawrence, aged sixteen years.

The Democrat, Wednesday, December 9, 1891.

Lawrence, Otto Brook The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-16-1940
Lawrence, Phenis The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-20, 4-21, 4-22-1931
Lawrence, R. French Mr. R. F. Lawrence died at 10 o’clock Monday night of typhoid fever, aged about 40 years. He leaves a wife, formerly Miss Rupard, and two children. Mr. Lawrence was a consistent member of the Fairfax street Church of Christ.   Funeral at the church at 10 a. m. today. Services by Eld. J. W. Jarding. Burial in the Winchester cemetery.

Winchester Sentinel   Wed., Dec. 10, 1902

 

Death Of French Lawrence

R. French Lawrence died Monday night at his home in this county of typhoid fever, aged about forty years. He leaves a wife formerly Miss Rupard, and two sons. The funeral was preached at the Church of Christ on Fairfax Street and the remains were buried in the family graveyard.

He was a good citizen and quite popular with all who knew him.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Dec. 12, 1902

 

Hunt

The remains of B. F. Lawrence, who died Monday night, near Winchester, of typhoid fever was interred in the family burying ground near Hunt, Wednesday night.

Winchester Sentinel Supplement Wed., Dec.17, 1902

Lawrence, Ralph Thomas The Winchester Sun   Wed., 12-16, 12-17-1970
Lawrence, Robert Age 52, male, he was a farmer, he was born in Clark County, KY, his parents were Henry and Elizabeth Lawrence, he lived in Clark County, KY, he died October 24, 1854 in Clark County, KY, of typhoid fever.

CCKD

Lawrence, Robert Ordered that Robert Lawrence be appointed guardian of the estate of Thomas V. Lawrence, Sabrina A. E. Lawrence and M. S. T. Lawrence infant orphans of Robert Lawrence …….security….with Bluford Fox ………..bond …..approved by the court.

Order Book 12; P.492; September Court 1852

 

Ct. vs. Robert Lawrence as guardian of M. S. T. Lawrence on summons ordered said summons be dismissed at said guardians cost.

Order Book 12; P.585; September Court 1853

 

Ct. vs. Robert Lawrence as guardian of S. A. C. Lawrence on summons ordered said summons be dismissed at said guardians cost.

Order Book 12; P.585; September Court 1853

 

Ct. vs. Robert Lawrence as guardian of T. V. Lawrence on summons ordered said summons be dismissed at said guardians cost.

Order Book 12; P.585; September Court 1853

 

Settlement with the guardian of Thomas V. Lawrence was produced …filed ….

Order Book 12; P. 591; September Court !853

Again produced ….approved ..recorded.

Order Book 12; P. 594; October Court !853

 

..death of the commissioner Robert Lawrence since the last term…ordered that George Disamatt be appointed with duties of said Lawrence….

Order Book 8; P. 298; November Court 1854

 

Edmund Baxter Gdn. &c On Petition ……..Equity

The plaintiff swore to and filed an amended petition ….ordered that James H. G. Bush, James Flanagan & John W. Hart be appointed commissioners to ascertain and report net value of ………estate of Robert Lawrence and annual profits thereof…………….

Order Book 10; P. 193; May Court 1859

 

Robert Lawrence’s gdn. On Petition

The petitioner Edmund Baxter with Robert Adams security ………covenant to Robert Lawrence………. land …..be sold ………..C. S. French as commissioner make sale………….

Order Book 10; P. 203; May Court 1859

 

Edmund Baxter Gdn. On Petition ……Equity

Order Book 10; P. 261; November Court 1859

Lawrence, Robert The Winchester Sun   Thur., 3-29-1917
Lawrence, S. E. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-10-1922
Lawrence, Sam L. Creelsboro, Ky., – Sam L. Lawrence, a wealthy distiller, was found dead on the roadside near his home. His body was bruised in several places and the authorities believe he was murdered.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, March 1, 1910

Lawrence, Shirley Anderson The Winchester Sun   Tues., 5-27-1924
Lawrence, Shirley Edward The Winchester Sun Tues, 88-28, -29, 8-30-2007
Lawrence, T. H. (Uncle Tommie) The Winchester Sun   Sat., 11-20-1943
Lawrence, Thomas The ways of fate are certainly strange, says an exchange, as proved by the death of Thomas Lawrence, of Pettis county, Mo. A year ago he was struck by an express train and picked up twenty yards away uninjured, and a month later he fell twenty feet from a barn roof and was not hurt. Last August he stopped a bolt of lightning and was unharmed. Last week, while on his way to his barn he stumbled over a six-months-old puppy and fell and broke his neck.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., May 19, 1903

Lawrence, Thomas Allen The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-16, 3-17-1964
Lawrence, W. H. The Winchester Sun,   Fri., 5-13, 5-14-1921
Lawrence, W. Smith The oldest man

Death of W. Smith Lawrence the oldest man in the county – veteran of the Mexican war

Mr. W. Smith Lawrence died yesterday morning at his home in the county of the infirmities of years, aged ninety-four years. The remains will be buried in the Winchester cemetery this afternoon with services at the grave by Rev. C.E. Crafton. He leaves on son, James T. Lawrence. He was a gallant soldier in the war with Mexico and, with the exception of B.S. Haggard, was the only surviving veteran of that war in the county and was the oldest man in the county. He had a great many friends who will regret to hear of his death. The following were pall bearers: M.H. Gardner, Joe S. Lindsay, W.T. Gordon, J.W. Scott, R.W. Gordon, and F.R. Gordon.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, November 3, 1908

Lawrence, Walter Gordon The Winchester Sun   Thur., 12-1, 12-2-1966
Lawrence, Will The Winchester Sun   Sat., 8-7-1943
Lawrence, William B. Died

W. B. Lawrence, aged 78 years, born and lived in this county all his life, died at his home September 29, from the infirmities of old age. Mr. Lawrence was a highly respected citizen. He leaves four children to mourn his loss, Mrs. Jas. Horsly, of West Bend, Mrs. Robt. Harris, Mrs. B. A. Ogden and John W. Lawrence, of this city

Winchester Sentinel   Wed., Oct. 1, 1902

 

Kiddville

Died, at 9 o’clock Monday night, of a complication of diseases, “Uncle” Billy Lawrence, aged 75 years. A good man much esteemed by all who knew him has gone; as a christian, neighbor and citizen, his like would be hard to find. His burial at 10 o’clock, October 1st. He leaves a wife, one son and three daughters, John Lawrence, Mrs. Ben Ogden, of Winchester, Mrs. James Hensley and Mrs. Joe Harris of this vicinity.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Oct. 3, 1902

 

Deaths

W. B. Lawrence, who lives near Oil Springs, died at his home Monday, aged 78 years, of the infirmities of old age. He leaves four children, Mrs. Jas. Hensley, of West Bend, Mrs. B. A. Ogden, John W. Lawrence and Mrs.Robt. Harris, of this city.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Oct. 3, 1902

 

County Court Items

C. C. Curry and Jas. Watts appointed appraisers of the estate of W. B. Lawrence and qualified also as commissioners for the division of the lands.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Oct. 17, 1902

Lawrence, William C. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 8-29-1930
Lawrence, William F. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-25-1944
Lawrence, William H. On motion of Simpson W. Brock who made oath ………certificate is granted ………letters of administration …..estate of William H. Lawrence dec. …….. with Allen A. Bush and S. B. Eubank entered into………. bond in penalty of $500 ………widow waived right to administer.

Order Book 12; P. 474; June 1852

 

On motion of Simpson W. Brock admin. of William H. Lawrence dec. ordered that William B. keas, Elijah Moreland, George W. Hughes and Calvin Robinson or any 3 ………….appraise ….personal estate of decedent …….report ……..

Order Book 12; P. 474; June 1852

 

Sale bill of the personalty of William H. Lawrence dec. was produced ……..recorded.

Order Book 12; P. 540; February Court 1853

 

Appraisement of the personalty of William H. Lawrence dec. was produced ………recorded.

Order Book 12; P. 541; February Court 1853

 

commissioner Simpson W. Brock is directed to collect the bond for the sale of land… W. S. Downey is appointed to convey by proper deed the interest of the heirs of the decedent Lawrence…..the court is continued.

Order Book 8; P. 52; April Court 1854

 

It is ordered that the receiver of any money from the sale of the land or the proceeds of the estate of William H. Lawrence dec…….

Order Book 8; P. 171; July Court 1854

 

..a deed of conveyance to Armstead Johnson approved…

Order Book 8; P. 293; October Court 1854

 

Additional report of commissioner Simpson W. Brock which was filed on Dec., 25th 1834 is this day noted in court.

Order Book 8; P. 305; April Court 1855

 

Deed to E. Moreland….filed

Order Book 8; P. 356; April Court 1855

 

Jonathan Murbridge vs. W. H. Lawrence heirs

Deed of conveyance to Elijah Moreland

Order Book 8; P. 512; July Court 1855

Lawrence, William Scobee The Winchester Sun   Wed., 3-10, 3-11-1982
Lawrence, William Scobee The Winchester Sun   Thur., 4-29-1993
Lawrence, Willie B. Died—On the 14th inst., Willie B., son of Jas. B. and Laura Lawrence. Age three months.

The Semi-Weekly Sun   Tuesday July 15, 1879

Lawson, Bud The Winchester Sun,   Tues., 4-26-1921
Lawson, C. A. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 10-23-1959
Lawson, Carl M. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 1-9-1996
Lawson, Charles Wesley The Winchester   Sun   Sat., 7-29-1933
Lawson, Curry The Winchester Sun   Mon., 7-22-1929
Lawson, D. M. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 11-26-1940
Lawson, Dolly Age 36, female, she was married, she was a house keeper, she was born in Clark County, KY, her parents were Thomas and Mary Jones, both her parents were born in Clark County, KY, she lived in Clark County, KY, she died in Clark County, KY, she died March 30, 1874, she died of a congestive chill.

CCKD

Lawson, Eliza Brown A Big Law Suit.

A law suit is pending in Baltimore over possession of a piece of property worth now several hundred thousand dollars. Attorney George Webb, of Lexington, but formerly of this county, this week received a letter from Baltimore in regard to it. The Lexington Herald prints the following about it.

“The story is that one Lawson, in 1765, came into this country and obtained possession of a tract of land on which a portion of Baltimore is now located. At his death, he conveyed the land to his trustees to be held in trust and used for the purpose of building and maintaining a church. In case the church ceased to exist the land was to revert to his wife or her heirs. Mr. Lawson’s wife formerly a Miss Eliza Brown upon her death gave the property in her possession to her sister, Priscilla Brown and the latter’s issue. Miss Priscilla married one Dr. Wm. Webb, of Virginia, who removed to Clark county, Ky., and died there about 1845. Dr. Webb’s daughter, Miss Eliza Lawson Webb, who was heir through her mother, married a Mr. Childs of Clark county. They died without children.

Finally the church did cease to exist and the property on which it was located was sold to the United States Government for the present custom house.

Mr. R. M. Webb, father of Mr. Geo. Webb and Mrs. Susan Childs were half brother and sister to Mrs. Eliza Lawson Childs, to whom a portion of this property was left and who died without issue.

Some years ago the heirs in Baltimore brought suit to recover the property, but were unable to prove their relationship to the original Mrs. Lawson.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, January 31, 1899

Lawson, George The Winchester Sun   Wed., 2-19-1919
Lawson, Hallie E. The Winchester   Sun   Sat., 7-29-1933
Lawson, Hiram F. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 10-1-1935
Lawson, Homer The Winchester Sun   Thur., 3-4-1993
Lawson, infant son Wades Mill

Died, March 12, infant son of Elijah Lawson and wife.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, March 18, 1898

Lawson, James B. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 8-13-1977
Lawson, James G. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 3-25, 3-26-2011
Lawson, Jerry Near Barbourville, a few days ago Rev. Jerry Lawson whipped his fifteen year old son, Isom, for fighting with a little brother. Monday the father was at work and the boy slipped up behind him and blew his head off with a load of buck shot.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, June 11, 1897

 

Lynchers Threaten Young Parricide

Barbourville Depot, Ky., June 10.—Young Lawson, who killed his father Monday evening, has not been caught yet. Lynching is talked of very freely among the friends of his father on Poplar creek, where the killing took place.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, June 11, 1897

 

At Barbourville, Thursday, Isom Lawson was held without bail in the examining court for killing his father, the Rev. Berry Lawson, last week. The young man Sears, arrested for complicity in the murder, was also refused bail.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, June 22, 1897

 

Isom Lawson was convicted at Barbourville for killing his father, and was given 99 years in the penitentiary. The old man was whipping the boy when killed.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday December 24, 1897

Lawson, Jimmie Lee The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-18-1963
Lawson, John A Case Of Suicide

Over at Mt. Vernon, John Lawson fell out with Charles Durham. He procured a gun and went to Durham’s house with the avowed intention of shedding blood. Durham met him with a shotgun and killed him. County Judge Lewis dismissed Durham, saying Lawson committed suicide by going to Durham’s house hunting trouble.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., April 28, 1903

Lawson, John Floyd (Steve) The Winchester Sun   Mon., 6-2-1958
Lawson, Laura The Winchester Sun Mon., 7-9-1917
Lawson, Lee The Winchester Sun   Sat., 5-16-1964
Lawson, Lou At Middlesboro, Lou Lawson, thirteen years old, was whipped by his teacher for some misdemeanor at school. On hearing of it his father whipped him again. This prayed upon his mind to such an extent that he committed suicide by taking morphine.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, February 28, 1894

Lawson, Mrs. Alexander The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-4-1927
Lawson, Mrs. Barbara Daniel The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-21-1998
Lawson, Mrs. Bettie Hunter The Winchester Sun   Thur., 8-23-1956
Lawson, Mrs. Deloris Thompson The Winchester Sun   Mon., 1-12-1998
Lawson, Mrs. Elizabeth Elkins The Winchester Sun   Tues., 12-27-1994
Lawson, Mrs. Etta Rose The Winchester Sun   Sat., 12-22-1973
Lawson, Mrs. Lelia Stokely The Winchester Sun   Mon., 6-29-1992
Lawson, Mrs. Lena The Winchester Sun   Thur., 3-10-1988
Lawson, Mrs. Leona E. Jones The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-12, 9-13-1994
Lawson, Mrs. Linda Gail Reed The Winchester Sun   Thur., 4-4-1991
Lawson, Mrs. Margaret The Winchester Sun   Fri., 2-14-1947
Lawson, Mrs. Opal The Winchester Sun   Mon., 7-12-1993
Lawson, Mrs. Rebecca Lynn

Gibbs

The Winchester Sun Thur., 2-8-2007
Lawson, Mrs. Ruby C. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-12, 8-13-2002
Lawson, Mrs. Stella The Winchester Sun     Mon., 12-4-1933
Lawson, Mrs. Vercie Haggard The Winchester Sun   Tues., 5-20-2008
Lawson, Mrs. Verna Bottoms The Winchester Sun   Wed., 8-24-1960
Lawson, Newton Governor Buckner has pardoned James L. Howard, of Montgomery county, who was sent to the penitentiary from Montgomery county for four years for manslaughter. He killed Newton Lawson, but the Judge and prosecuting attorney became convinced he was acting in what he believed was self defense, and in consequence, recommended his pardon, which was granted.

The Democrat, Wednesday, January 22, 1890.

Lawson, Porter The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-26-1926
Lawson, Robert Boyd (R. B.) The Winchester Sun   Tues., 1-5-2010
Lawson, Ronald E. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 3-29-2001
Lawson, Stanley The Winchester Sun   Tues., 5-10-1994
Lawson, Theresa Michelle The Winchester Sun   Fri., 9-26-2008
Lawson, Tom The Winchester Sun Fri., 6-20-1913
Lawson, W. P. Frankfort, Ky., – Clay Lawson, of Wolfe county, serving two years sentence for killing his cousin, W.P. Lawson, was paroled by the board of prison commissioners. This parole will be the last granted under the old law, unless an emergency similar to this one exists. Lawson’s wife is at the point of death with typhoid fever. He has served eight months of his term.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, April 19, 1910

Lawson, William The Winchester Sun     Tues., 2-11-1936
Lawson, Wm. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 8-26-1914
Lawter, George The Winchester Sun Fri., 4-25-1913
Lawton, Mrs. Henry W. Mrs. Lawron Buys A Home

Peewee Valley, Ky., Aug. 14

Mrs. Lawton, widow of the lamented Gen. Henry W. Lawton, who was killed in an engagement in the Philippines, has purchased the Allan Hite property, between Central and Oak Leaf avenues, and will build a handsome residence on it this fall.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Aug., 20, 1901

Lawwill, Clara H. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-21-1946
Lawwill, Clara Hellen The Winchester Sun   Sat., 10-18-1947
Lawwill, Dempsey The Winchester Sun   Sat., 12-4, 12-6-1943
Lawwill, Dempsey S. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 7-17-1987
Lawwill, Ernest Kenzell The Winchester Sun   Fri., 3-18-1960
Lawwill, Eulah Jean The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-8-1999
Lawwill, James W The Winchester Sun   Sat., 8-30-1919
Lawwill, James Winston The Winchester Sun   Thur., 8-2-1917
Lawwill, Jane The Winchester Sun   Fri., 5-8-1931
Lawwill, Jauanita The Winchester Sun   Sat., 4-5-1924
Lawwill, John Edward The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-28-1994
Lawwill, John Edward Jr. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-6-1967
Lawwill, John Jr. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 2-21, 2-22-2008
Lawwill, John Sr. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 5-22, 5-23-1963
Lawwill, Mrs. Estella Hollearn The Winchester Sun   Tues., 10-31, 11-2-1972
Lawwill, Mrs. Ida The Winchester Sun   Tues., 3-17-1959
Lawwill, Mrs. Lucile The Winchester Sun   Tues., 7-3-1945
Lawwill, Mrs. Mattie Lee The Winchester Sun   Tues., 12-10-1963
Lawwill, Thomas Dudley The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-13-1968
Lawwill, William The Winchester Sun   Sat., 9-12-1964
Lawwill, William S. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 10-29-1938
Lax, Frank Middle Four Mile

Thomas Hays will leave in a few days for McKee, Jackson county, as a witness against Granville Hayes, who killed Frank Lax last December.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, April 22, 1898

Lay, Aleen The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-14-1930
Lay, Arthur Asylum Inmate

Escapes, Buys a Pistol and Sends a Bullet Through His Brain

Hopkinsville, Ky., April 22.—Arthur Lay, aged 22, suicided here Wednesday morning. Last month he was indicted on three counts for forgery at Bowling Green, Ky., his home. He escaped the penalty by a plea of insanity being sent to the asylum here. Tuesday night he escaped from the institution by letting himself down a distance of 40 feet by a rope made of his underclothes. At six o’clock Wednesday morning he entered a hardware store and asked to be shown pistols. He suddenly seized a loaded one and shot a bullet through his brain, dying in a few minutes. He left a letter saying that he was tired of life and asked that his money and body be sent to his mother at Bowling Green.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, April 23, 1897

Lay, Fred The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-12, 11-13, 11-14-2001
Lay, James Edward The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-30, 10-31, 11-1-1978
Lay, James Reo The Winchester Sun   Fri., 3-8-1985
Lay, Lillon A sad accident

The papers tell of a deplorable accident near Buckeye, Garrard county, in which Boyle Lay, aged eighteen, accidentally shot and killed his brother, Lillon, aged thirteen. The two boys were out rabbit hunting and ran a rabbit into a hollow log. Boyle told Lillon to go to one end of the log and place his hat over it to prevent the rabbit running out and he would fire into the other end. Instead of doing this Lillon knelt down and looked into the log. Thinking only his brother’s hat was there, Boyle fired, blowing his brother’s head almost off, killing him instantly. Boyle is almost crazed from grief.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, January 26, 1909

Lay, Mrs. Anna Duerson The Winchester Sun   Wed., 5-4, 5-5, 5-14-1960
Lay, Mrs. Bertha T. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 1-12-1955
Lay, Mrs. Delton Y. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-14-1930
Lay, Robin Lynn Madden The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-14-1998
Lay, Will                               AA The Winchester Sun Thur., 8-29-1929
Lay, William A. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 1-21, 1-23-1930
Laymon, Mrs. Hazel Willoughby The Winchester Sun   Wed., 6-14-2006
Layne, Brack The Winchester   Sun   Tues., 10-24-1933
Layne, Charles The Winchester Sun Mon.   9-23-1912
Layne, Charles B. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-20-1937
Layne, Curtis Dillon The Winchester Sun   Wed., 4-27, 4-28-1994
Layne, Dallas I. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 2-6-1993
Layne, Delmar O. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 2-7, 2-8-1997
Layne, Ella Bell The Winchester Sun   Mon., 6-18-1990
Layne, Fannie May The Winchester Sun   Mon., 7-18-1921
Layne, Grant Mason The Winchester Sun   Tues., 5-24, 5-25-1960
Layne, Harry C. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 12-5, 12-8, 12-9, 12-13, 12-14-2006
Layne, Henry The Winchester Sun  Sat., 5-20-1933
Layne, Henry                       AA Run Down By A Train

Catlettsburg, Ky., Aug., 15

Henry Layne and Fred Ratliff, colored of this place, while driving in Caredo, W. Va., were run down by a C. &. O. excursion train. Layne was killed instantly and Ratliff will die.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., August 21, 1900

Layne, Hester L. Owens The Winchester Sun   Fri., 4-30-2004
Layne, James Andrew (Andy) The Winchester Sun   Tues., 8-5, 8-6-1986
Layne, John W. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 5-2-1956
Layne, Judy The Winchester Sun   Fri., 10-9-1942
Layne, L. E. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 6-30-1921
Layne, Mary Juanita The Winchester Sun Wed., 7-25, 7-26-2007
Layne, Mrs. Bertha Reed The Winchester Sun   Wed., 8-19, 8-20-1970
Layne, Mrs. Lillian Thompson

(Tottie)

The Winchester Sun   Tues., 1-3, 1-4-1995
Layne, Mrs. Maudie The Winchester Sun   Wed., 3-24, 3-25-1982
Layne, Mrs. Nancy Lee The Winchester Sun   Thur., 7-10-1980
Layne, Reva D. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 3-1, 3-2-2001
Layne, Russell The Winchester Sun   Sat., 3-19-1932
Layne, Tom The Winchester Sun   Thur., 11-4-1954
Layne, William S. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-5, 5-6-1924
Layne, Winford Neal The Winchester Sun Tues., 9-4-2007
Layson, John Clark The Winchester Sun Sat., 6-21-1913
Layson, Lannie The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-4-1927
Layton, Lewis Hunter Shoots Himself.

Richmond, Ky., Aug. 10.—Louis Layton, son of Wm. Layton, a well known farmer living at Edenton, this county, accidentally shot and killed himself while hunting.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, August 16, 1898

Layton, Mrs. Inez Ray The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-24-1997
Layton, Robert The Winchester Sun   Tues., 6-13-1922
Laywall, Louis County Court Items

The will of Louis Laywell was admitted to probate.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Sept. 29, 1899

 

County Court Items

A.A. Clay qualified as executor of Lewis Laywell, alias Ashcraft, without bond.

A.B. Hampton, G. W. Hisle and B. C. Forman appointed appraisers of the estate of Lewis Laywell.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Nov. 17, 1899

Lazar, Mrs. Sara Stoddard The Winchester Sun   Mon., 1-28-2002
Lea, Floyd The Winchester Sun   Tues., 9-7, 9-8-1967
Lea, John Amber The Winchester Sun   Thur., 9-3, 9-4-1964
Lea, Mrs. Tinsa Ellen The Winchester Sun   Tues., 4-26-1977
Leach, Absalom The Winchester Sun   Wed., 6-27-1923
Leach, Alfred Banta The Winchester Sun   Wed., 1-5-2000
Leach, Alice Triplett The Winchester Sun   Tues., 9-11-1990
Leach, Charles The Winchester Sun   Fri., 4-21-1916
Leach, Clell The Winchester Sun Tues., 8-18-1998
Leach, Donald D. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 2-13-1932
Leach, Earl Dudley The Winchester Sun   Tues., 1-16-1996
Leach, Earl W. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 8-30-1935
Leach, Edward The Winchester Sun     Tues., 9-6-1932
Leach, Frank Kiser The Winchester Sun   Fri., 8-13-2004
Leach, G. B. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 5-31-1966
Leach, Ida IDA, the 7-year-old child of Mary Leach, was burned to death at Georgetown Saturday.

The Democrat, Wednesday, January 18, 1893.

Leach, James The Winchester Sun Thur., 9-2, 9-3-1937
Leach, Joe The Winchester Sun Mon., 6-2-1913
Leach, Lon W. Carpenter Died Suddenly

Lexington, Ky., March 20

Lon W. Leach, a carpenter, died suddenly at a boarding house, at 245 Main Street. Mr. Leach had just finished his supper, and as he started to leave the dining room dropped dead.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., March 23, 1906

Leach, M. M. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 7-25-1922
Leach, Mrs. Barbara Jean The Winchester Sun   Thur., 4-24, 4-25-2003
Leach, Mrs. Bertha L. Reffitt The Winchester Sun   Tues., 12-23-2003, Tues., 7-20, 7-23-2004

Scobee Funeral Home Web Site 12-22-2003

Leach, Mrs. Bessie Johnson The Winchester Sun   Tues., 4-1-1986
Leach, Mrs. Emma The Winchester Sun   Wed., 7-27-1932
Leach, Mrs. Ethel Henry The Winchester Sun   Wed., 12-6-1916
Leach, Mrs. J. B. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 7-11-1944
Leach, Mrs. James Hampton The Winchester Sun   Mon., 7-11-1921
Leach, Mrs. Lititia The Winchester Sun   Sat., 9-22-1934
Leach, Roger, Clark The Winchester Sun   Wed., 2-26-1975
Leach, Terance Ray Hampton The Winchester Sun   Fri., 5-24-1991
Leach, Thomas Harris The Winchester Sun   Mon., 7-17-1967
Leach, Tom The Winchester Sun   Tues., 10-14-1924
Leadingham, Alice Lucie The Winchester Sun   Sat., 9-3-1927
Leadingham, Estill The Winchester Sun   Sat., 9-3-1927
Leadingham, Jewel Maxine The Winchester Sun   Sat., 9-3-1927
League, Jerry Jerry League, aged 89, dropped dead in Mercer. He is the first of 14 children to die, the youngest of whom is 72.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, August 16, 1893

League, John The Winchester Sun Wed., 7-31, 8-1-1912
Leakey, James Settlement with the administrator of the estate of James dec. was produced in court approved and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 10; P. 182; May Court 1834

Lean, John Ordered that Lucy Lean be appointed guardian to Lucinda Lean orphan of John Lean with Nicholas Alridge security.

Order Book 10 P. 61 January 1832

Lear, Frank V. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-26-1987
Lear, Frank Y. Jr. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 11-10, 11-11-1912
Lear, Mrs. Anna Marie Reid The Winchester Sun   Tues., 3-5-2002
Lear, Mrs. Christine Vanderpool The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-21-1994
Lear, Mrs. Gladys VanPelt The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-22-1982
Leary, Julia Julia Leary administrator vs. Dan Holren

…..Commissioner to make sale of lot…. the estate of Julia Leary decd….

Order Book 20; P. 193 – 194; May Court 1888

 

Julia Leary administrator vs. Dan Holren

…..Commissioner to make report of all claims against the estate of Julia Leary decd….

Order Book 20; P. 195; May Court 1888

Leary, T. L. Deaths

Prof. T. L. Leary died the past week at Hartford, Conn., aged seventy-two years. He was a teacher of penmanship and bookkeeping and had taught in nearly all the cities of the Blue Grass Region, including this city.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., April 14, 1903

Leasburg, Mrs. Myrtle Stewart The Winchester Sun   Tues., 11-17, 11-18-1970
Leaseburg, John H. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 5-18, 5-19-1960
Leasor, Mrs. Mary Harrod The Winchester Sun   Wed., 12-13-1967
Leath, A. Dalton The Winchester Sun   Fri., 5-6, 5-7-1994
Leath, Mrs. Adelia W. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-25, 2-26-2008
Leath, Mrs. Bradley The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-20-1961
Leath, Virginia Carolyn The Winchester Sun   Sat., 7-31-1976
Leath, William W. (Bill) The Winchester Sun   Tues., 2-3, 2-4-1998
Leathers, Allison The Winchester Sun   Wed., 6-9-1937
Leathers, Roy The Winchester Sun,   Wed., 5-25-1921
Leathers, Squire The Winchester Sun   Sat., 2-11-1933
Leathers, William Died From Poison Oak

Near Danville, William Leathers, a young farmer, was cleaning a fence row and came in contact with poison oak, and died in a few days from the poisoning.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Sept., 11, 1903

Leavell, Grant Ended in Murder

Lancaster, Ky., April 27—Grant Leavell, who was shot with a pistol in the hands of Porter Wearen, died Tuesday morning. Wearen is under guard and a preliminary trial will be held Saturday. The defense claims that Leavell was striking Wearens brother with a stick when the shot was fired.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, May 2, 1898

 

Acquitted of Killing a Negro.

Lancaster, Ky., Dec. 2.—A jury in the circuit court Thursday acquitted Porter Wearen, a prominent young white man, of the charge of murder. Wearen killed Grant Leavell, a Negro, last June.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, December 6, 1898

Leavell, William Wound Proved Fatal

Louisville, Ky., April 18

William Leavell, proprietor of the Sapho saloon, who was shot by Bud Schaefer, a bartender of New Albany on Easter Sunday, died Wednesday of his injuries.

The Winchester Democrar   Tue., April 23, 1901

Leavell, William Garfield The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-22-1934
Leavens, Julia Pauline Clark County Republican   Fri. 1-26-1917
Leavy, Samuel T. Lexington – Capt. Samuel T. Leavy, of Midway, an officer in Gen. John Hunt Morgan’s noted brigade of confederate raiders is dead, aged 70 years. He was overcome by heat a week ago and gradually sank.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, July 29, 1910

LeBlanc, Clarence G. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 7-11-1998
Lebo, Vernon Louis The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-4-1997
LeBus, Clarence The Winchester Sun   Tue., 6-19-1928
LeBus, Jessie Minister VanMeter The Winchester Sun   Tues., 10-25-1994
LeBus, Lewis Martin II The Winchester Sun   Tues., 5-18-1993
LeBus, Mrs. Mary Bell Burt The Winchester Sun   Thur., 11-30-1961
Lebus, Orie The Winchester Sun   Sat., 4-17-1941
Lebus, Orie II The Winchester Sun   Fri., 5-6-1983
Lebzelter, Mrs. Catherine The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-23, 4-24-1956
LeClere, August The Winchester Sun   Wed., 7-11-1928
LeCompte, Mrs. Sarah The Winchester Sun   Sat., 10-18-1913
Ledbetter, Mrs. Vivian Fay The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-2-1994
Leddingham, James Floyd The Winchester Sun   Fri.,. 8-23-1935
Ledford, Arnold The Winchester Sun   Thur., 9-13-1928
Ledford, Bud Killings Near Lancaster.

James Rogers Kills Brother-in-Law and Fountain Land His Stepson.

Lancaster, Ky., June 23.—Sunday afternoon at Harmon’s Lick school house, nine miles east of here, James Rogers shot and instantly killed his brother-in-law, Bud Ledford. Rogers states that Ledford drew a knife on him and advanced over a remark made by him, Rogers. Ledford is survived by a widow and four small children. Rogers came to this city late Sunday evening and gave himself up to the officers.

Fountain Land shot   and killed his stepson, B. Land, Sunday with a pistol. The younger Land was under the influence of liquor and had been trying all day to provoke a difficulty with his stepfather. It culminated in the killing of young Land, who was advancing on his stepfather with an uplifted ax, when he was killed. The dead man was about 35 years old and single. He bore the reputation of being quarrelsome. Fountain Land is a farmer and a good citizen. The killing occurred in Madison, just across the line from this city.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, June 26, 1903

Ledford, Charles E. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-16-1987
Ledford, David E. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 6-29-1962
Ledford, Edwin The Winchester Sun Fri., 3-23, 3-24-2007
Ledford, Henry A. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 9-6-1916
Ledford, Henry Clay The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-25-1939
Ledford, Henry Thomas The Winchester Sun   Fri., 8-20, 8-21-1948
Ledford, Henry Thomas The Winchester Sun   Mon., 6-2, 6-3-1969
Ledford, Henry W. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 9-11-1997
Ledford, Homer C. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 12-12, 12-13, 12-14-2006
Ledford, infant The Winchester Sun Sat., 11-23-1912
Ledford, J. B. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-19, 10-20-1987
Ledford, J. Robert The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-29-1965
Ledford, Jesse M. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-24-1921
Ledford, Joe The Winchester Sun     Fri., 11-17-1933
Ledford, John The Winchester Sun   Mon., 1-29-1973
Ledford, May Bean The Winchester Sun   Tues., 9-12-1944
Ledford, Mrs. Anna B. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 11-26-1966
Ledford, Mrs. Belle The Winchester Sun   Thur., 1-14-1954
Ledford, Mrs. Cyrenne McCoun The Winchester Sun   Mon., 1-6-2003
Ledford, Mrs. Kate The Winchester Sun   Thur., 10-26-1995
Ledford, Mrs. Lillian Hudson The Winchester Sun   Fri., 7-3-1992
Ledford, Mrs. Lula Duff The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-31-1994
Ledford, Mrs. Nettie Browning The Winchester Sun   Tues., 4-13, 4-14-1943
Ledford, Mrs. Ova Lee The Winchester Sun   Thur., 1-4-1973
Ledford, Mrs. Ruth Pinnell The Winchester Sun   Mon., 6-3-1957
Ledford, Pete Wades Mill

Squire D. P. Hardman was called to Bath county last week on account of the sudden death of his brother-in-law, Uncle Pete Ledford. He had been at Carlisle on Tuesday and was taken sick at __ o’clock that night and died before midnight of heart disease, of which he had suffered for the past 20 years. He was an honest, hardworking, lawabiding citizen. He was about 65 years old.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Feb. 22, 1901

Ledford, Stephen Killed in pitched battle

Harlan – In a pitched battle between Stephen Ledford, Carter Unthank and Thomas Noe, Jr., at Wallins Creek, eight miles west of here, Stephen Ledford was shot and instantly killed, receiving eight revolver wounds in his body. Carter Unthank was shot in the upper part of his left thigh and died three hours later. These three persons had been together all day and seemed to be on excellent terms. Late in the evening they left Wallins Creek postoffice and started up Terry’s creek, when they arrived at a point in the road where the affray began. Thomas Noe, Jr., was arrested by Sheriff J.S. Kelly, who left here for that place as soon as he received intelligence of the tragedy.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, September 20, 1910

Ledgerwood, William Samuel Ledgerwood, one of the Executors of William Ledgerwood, dec.

Order Bk. 1; P. 75; January 28 Court, 1794

 

Appraisal of the slaves, if any, and personal estate of William Ledgerwood dec., ordered by court.

Order Book 1; P. 80; January 29 Court, 1794

 

Will Book 1, Page 14

Dated: May 7, 1792

Recorded: January 28, 1794

Ledington, Mrs. Grant The Winchester Sun   Mon., 6-4-1934
Ledinski, James Edward Jr.

(Eddie)

The Winchester Sun   Thur., 9-8, 9-9-1960
Ledlow, Mrs. Hazel Voyles The Winchester Sun Wed., 11-18-1981
Ledwidge, Mrs. Mary Hickman – Mrs. Mary Ledwidge died at her home after a lingering illness. Death was due to dropsy. She was 76 years old and one of the early settlers of the county.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, May 31, 1910

Lee Family HERE AND THERE – Five members of a family named Lee were burned to death near Greenville Thursday night.

The Democrat, Wednesday, March 8, 1893.

Lee, A. H. Manager A. H. Lee of the Login (PA) iron works, was found dead in a crack. Mysterious.

The Democrat, Friday, January 1, 1892.

Lee, Aaron The Winchester Sun   Wed., 7-8-1914
Lee, Ada Gossett The Winchester Sun   Mon., 6-26, 6-28-1995
Lee, Alva The Winchester Sun   Mon., 1-16-1922
Lee, Amelia The Winchester Sun   Tues., 3-23, 3-24-1971
Lee, Angela Elaine The Winchester Sun   Fri., 4-2-1971
Lee, Arthur The Winchester Sun Thur., 1-2-1913
Lee, Arthur The Winchester Sun     Sat., 2-15-1936
Lee, Ben F. Prepared Himself for Death

Elizabethtown, Ky., Feb. 5.—Near White Mills in this county, Mr. Ben F. Lee, 96 years of age died Friday. He purchased the coffin in which he was buried 22 years ago, and at the same time he selected and had delivered his tombstone.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, February 8, 1898

 

Died—Near White Mill, Mr. Ben F. Lee, an old man ninety-six years of age, died a few days ago. He purchased the coffin in which he was buried and the tombstone that was to mark his future grave, twenty-two years ago. The coffin was gotten out and cleaned up and was in good condition on the day of his death.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, February 8, 1898

Lee, Bennie The Winchester Sun   Thur., 3-19-1936
Lee, Charles The Winchester Sun   Thur., 10-4-1923
Lee, Charles The Winchester Sun   Sat., 12-8-1956
Lee, Charles Edward (James) The Winchester Sun   Tues., 4-28, 4-29-1998
Lee, Charles Milton The Winchester Sun Tues., 8-11, 8-12-1981
Lee, children Children Swept Away.

Williamsburg, Ky., July 7.—Two small boys, the children of Anna Lee, were drowned in the eastern part of this county by a cloudburst. They had been sent out by their mother to   drive the cows home. When the rain came up they took shelter in a small shed which was washed away.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, July 11, 1902

Lee, David Bush The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-9-1991
Lee, David F. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 2-4-1932
Lee, David R. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 1-3-1977
Lee, Demira The Winchester Sun   Thur., 7-26-1956
Lee, Dillard E. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 11-9, 11-10-2011
Lee, Donald William The Winchester Sun Fri., 5-11, 5-12-2007
Lee, Donith B. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 9-17, 9-18-1985
Lee, Eddie The Winchester Sun   Thurs., 8-22-1918
Lee, Edwin R. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-6, 5-8, 5-9-1991
Lee, Ellen Deaths

Friday, of consumption, Miss Ellen Lee, daughter of W. H. Lee, aged about sixteen years. The funeral was preached at the family residence by Rev. J. R. Savage Saturday and the remains were buried in the family graveyard.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., May 12, 1903

Lee, Ernest The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-15-1937
Lee, Ernie The Winchester Sun   Tues., 9-7-1926
Lee, Feldon                           AA The Winchester Sun   Wed., 2-24-1937
Lee, Fitzhugh Maj. Gen. Fitzhugh Lee, U. S. A. retired, died Friday aged 68, of apoplexy. He was stricken Friday morning on the train while coming from Boston to Washington but managed to reach the hospital before he died. Gen. Lee was a soldier in two wars, a noted Indian fighter, a statesman and a diplomat. He also won success as a farmer in the Valley of Virginia. His appointment as Major General in the War with Spain was one of those beautiful public acts of the late President McKinley that has done so much to wipe out sectional feeling. He was a nephew of Robt. E. Lee.

The Sun-Sentinel, Thursday, May 4, 1905

Lee, Frank The Winchester Sun   Wed., 12-2-1925
Lee, G. W. C. The Winchester Sun Wed., 2-19-1913
Lee, Geo. Died—Geo. Lee died of heart disease and paralysis at his home in Bourbon county Friday, aged forty-one years. He leaves a wife and two children. He formerly lived in this county and was buried in the Winchester cemetery Sunday under the auspices of Elkin Lodge, No. 696, F. & A. M.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, April 26, 1898

Lee, George                           AA On Saturday night, Mat. Tevis and Geo. Lee, two Negroes, the latter from Paris, became involved in a difficulty over a game of cards and a fight resulted, during the progress of which Tevis was stabbed in the region of the kidneys from the effects of which he will probably die. On learning of the affair, officer Ben Allen went in search of Lee, found and arrested him. He was warned by Allen that he would be shot if he attempted to escape, but he gave no heed to the warning but ran. Allen shot at him the bullet striking him in the back. He was placed in jail where his wound was examined and pronounced not mortal. On Monday night, however, he grew worse and about 10 o’clock died. The coroner held an inquest yesterday afternoon which completely exonerated Mr. Allen from all blame.

The Winchester Democrat     Wed., 4-25-1888

Lee, George Henry The Winchester Sun   Mon., 1-9, 1-10, 1-12-1995
Lee, George Henry                 AA The Winchester Sun   Thur., 5-1-1919
Lee, George W. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 10-6-1961
Lee, Gilbert (Buster)             AA The Winchester Sun   Wed., 9-4-1935
Lee, girl The Winchester   Sun   Tues., 10-24-1933
Lee, H. G. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 4-30-1985
Lee, Harry                               AA Lagrange – James Lee, a negro, shot and instantly killed his brother, Harry. Harry Lee had just completed a term in the penitentiary, and returning home in an intoxicated condition, became involved in a quarrel with his brother.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, November 4, 1910

Lee, Harvey C. Died in Tennessee

Mr. Harvey C. Lee, of Carlisle, died Saturday at Knoxville, Tennessee, and his remains passed through here Monday morning for Carlisle where his parents reside and where the interment will take place today. Mr. Lee is survived by a wife and one son. He was well known here and was a nephew of Mrs. Waller Calmes. Mr. and Mrs. Calmes and Mrs. Lee S. Baldwin attended the funeral.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, January 21, 1908

Lee, Henry                           AA The Winchester Sun   Fri., 6-15, 6-16-1934
Lee, infant                            AA Jane Lee, a Hawesville negro woman and other female members of her family are afflicted with a peculiar mania. Recently Jane smothered her child and then threw it into the river. She was arrested, confessed the crime and has been held over without bond. This inhumane mother was herself left in the Courthouse garret to die when two days old, and her brother was thrown into a pile of grapevines, one hour after birth. Jane gave birth to the child she killed in a blackberry patch and left it to die.

The Democrat, Wednesday, March 22, 1893.

Lee, J. N. Died at Lewisburg

J.N. Lee died Saturday at Lewisburg, aged sixty-three years. He was a brother of Mrs. J.T. Luman and Miss Nancy Lee, of this city.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, Oct. 19, 1906

Lee, James The Winchester Sun   Wed., 4-1-1931
Lee, James The Winchester Sun     Wed., 9-28, 9-29-1932
Lee, James A. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-5-1988
Lee, James R. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-7-1938
Lee, Jas. Mortally Wounded

Jas. Lee, of Mt. Sterling, was attacked by robbers while on his way home Friday night. After a desperate fight he beat the robbers off, when one of them shot him in the head inflicting a fatal wound.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., June 26, 1900

Lee, Jepp The Winchester Sun   Sat., 2-25-1928
Lee, Joe The Winchester Sun     Mon., 8-7-1933
Lee, Joe                                 AA Clarence Elkin, of Lexington, was held over in $1,000 for killing Joe Lee a negro recently.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., May 30, 1899

 

Acquitted

Clarence Elkin, of Lexington, was acquitted Thursday of the murder of Joe Lee, colored. This was the second trial, the first resulting in a hung jury. Elkin has numerous relatives in this county.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., June 12, 1900

Lee, John Indictments for murder

Returned against sheriff and posse that captured Frank Ball

Middlesboro, Ky., – The Grand jury in session in Lee county, Virginia, returned indictments against Kentucky officers who captured Frank Ball at Rose Hill August 9. The men are charged with the murder of John Lee. Lee was killed in the fight between Ball and the officers. Those indicted are Rice W. Johnson, sheriff of Bell county; R.L. Givens, Gordon Givens, Newton J. Wilburn, John Glynn, of Middlesboro, and James Rollins, Ike Vanbibber and John Wilson, of Pineville, deputy sheriffs. It is said that Gov. Swanson will ask Gov. Beckham for requisitions of these men. The members of the party who assisted the sheriff and his posse have been indicted as accessories to the murder of Lee. This party was composed principally of business men of Middlesboro and Pineville.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, September 28, 1906

Lee, John Mrs. Waller Calmes, and son, Waller Jr., and Mrs. Lee S. Baldwin were at Carlisle yesterday to attend the funeral of Mr. John Lee, who was a brother-in-law of Mrs. Calmes.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, November 9, 1909

Lee, John The Winchester Sun   Fri., 3-23-1934
Lee, John The Winchester Sun   Sat., 3-9-1963
Lee, John Chester The Winchester Sun   Tues., 11-24-1925
Lee, John Childress The Winchester Sun   Wed., 4-1-1992
Lee, John Harrison The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-8-1947
Lee, Johnnie The Winchester Sun   Thur., 10-4, 10-5-1979
Lee, Joseph The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-17-1986
Lee, Landon Paul The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-7-1968
Lee, Larkin A fatal affray

Larkin Lee stabbed to death Thursday night by John Hopper

About eight o’clock Thursday night a difficulty occurred on what is known as “Rat Row,” a suburb on the Southern side of the city. John Hopper, aged about sixty years stabbed and killed Larkin Lee. Coroner Brinegar was at a house not far away and he arrested Hopper and lodged him in jail. He held an inquest the following day with the following jury, viz: Wiley J. Watts, S.P. Gannon, H.T. Williams, J.M. Lawrence, O.N. Todd and Gus Aldridge. From the testimony before the jury it appears that the men had been drinking at Hopper’s home and that Lee had left and started to town. Hopper followed him and forced him to go back and go to bed. Hopper being armed with a big stick and a shotgun. After forcing Lee to lie down, Hopper approached the bed, when Lee grappled with him and threw him down on the bed and held him down. When he released Hopper the latter stabbed him just below the heart. Lee walked out into the yard and fell dead. The jury, after hearing the evidence returned the verdict in accordance with the facts, and expressed the opinion that the crime was murder. Lee had about attained his majority and last summer married the daughter of the old blind fiddler, Charles, who frequently comes here. Neither Hopper nor Lee bore a very good reputation in the community. The remains of Lee were buried by the county in the paupers graveyard.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, February 11, 1908

 

Will be held today

The examining trial of John Hopper for the murder of Larkin Lee will be held before Judge Evans today.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, February 11, 1908

 

Warned to leave

The two daughters of John Hopper who killed Larkin Lee, on Rat Row last week, reported that an unsigned note had been received by them warning them to leave the community, but that they would not obey the demand.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, February 14, 1908

 

Held over

The examination of John Hopper for the murder of Larkin Lee was held before Judge Evans Friday and at its conclusion Hopper was held over to the sum of $1,250 for his appearance at Circuit court. Hopper was unable to give bail and was remanded to jail to await the action of Circuit court. The case attracted much attention and quite a crowd was present.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, February 18, 1908

 

Circuit court

An indictment was returned; John Hopper, murder, for killing Larkin Lee.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, April 10, 1908

 

Circuit court

John Hopper was sentenced to eleven years in the penitentiary for killing Larkin Lee at the former’s home in Mooresville last December. He made a plea for a new trial, but it was overruled and he will not appeal.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, May 5, 1908

 

Prisoner paroled

John Hopper, who formerly lived at Mooresville, near the suburbs of this city, cut and killed Larkin Lee, at the former’s home about four years ago. He was tried and given eleven years in the penitentiary for the crime. He is an old man, over seventy, and the past week the Prison Board granted him a parole on the recommendation of Judge Benton.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, August 9, 1910

Lee, Leighton Dead From His Injuries.

Chicago, Nov. 16.—Leighton Lee, the Philadelphia engineering contractor who was injured October 14 by falling from the South Side Elevated streetcar, died at mercy hospital Tuesday. His remains will be shipped to Philadelphia for interment.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, November 18, 1898

Lee, Levi Double Tragedy in Bracken

Deputy Sheriff Louis Pope went out Monday to arrest James Lee, who killed Dan Shepperd. Lee’s brother Levi, attacked the officer and was killed. This made the second tragedy in Bracken county in less than twenty-four hours.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, November 8, 1895

Lee, Marvin M. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-23-1987
Lee, Mary                               AA The Winchester Sun   Sat., 4-1-1916
Lee, Mrs. Ada McKee The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-3-1969
Lee, Mrs. Alice Jones The Winchester Sun   Sat., 1-17-1953
Lee, Mrs. Alma Watts The Winchester Sun   Fri., 4-11-1975
Lee, Mrs. Christine Sumpter The Winchester Sun   Wed., 9-3-1997
Lee, Mrs. Dollie (Mama) The Winchester Sun   Tues., 2-1, 2-2-1977
Lee, Mrs. Elizabeth The Winchester Sun   Sat., 3-28-1987
Lee, Mrs. Genevo Sparkman The Winchester Sun   Tues., 9-14, 9-15-1982
Lee, Mrs. Goldie M. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 12-6, 12-7-1995
Lee, Mrs. Gracie K. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 6-19-1993
Lee, Mrs. Hannah The Winchester Sun   Wed., 5-8-1935
Lee, Mrs. Helena Francis

Lockhart

The Winchester Sun   Wed., 1-25-1989
Lee, Mrs. Henrietta Sewell The Winchester Sun   Fri., 9-30-1977
Lee, Mrs. Irene Sams The Winchester Sun   Wed., 12-10-1986
Lee, Mrs. J. A. MRS. J. A. LEE, a highly respected and most estimable lady of Mercer county suicided Friday by taking morphine. A letter was found that explained the cause. She and her husband had for some time, been living apart, and she was convinced that the separation would be a permanent one. With four little children to be separated from their father, and to be deprived of a happy home, was more than she could bear.   Life had become a grevious burden, and she sought relief in death.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, April 3, 1894.

Lee, Mrs. James M. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 9-7-1938
Lee, Mrs. Jodie Short The Winchester Sun   Tues., 3-24, 3-25-1970
Lee, Mrs. Kathryn Estes The Winchester Sun   Thur., 10-27-1983
Lee, Mrs. Kitty The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-6-1944
Lee, Mrs. Leslie Carol Pasley The Winchester Sun   Wed., 5-27, 5-28-1992
Lee, Mrs. Mary Jane The Winchester Sun   Tues., 9-5-1961
Lee, Mrs. Nancy Death Of Mrs. Nancy Lee

Mrs. Nancy Lee died at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. J. T. Luman, on West Broadway, Tuesday afternoon of heart disease, aged eighty-two years. The remains were carried to her old home, Lewisburg, Mason County, for interment Thursday morning.

She leaves seven children, three sons in Mason county, two sons in Fleming county, and two daughters in this city, Mrs. J. T. Luman and Miss Nancy Lee.

The funeral was preached by the pastor of the Christian Church at her old home, of which she had for many years been a consistent member

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Dec. 21, 1900

 

Mr. J. Wesley Lee, of Maysville, was summoned here Tuesday by the serious illness of his mother, Mrs. Nancy Lee, but she died two hours before he reached here.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Dec. 21, 1900

Lee, Mrs. Nancy The Winchester Sun   Sat., 1-25-1919
Lee, Mrs. Nancy Muir The Winchester Sun   Thur., 8-11, 8-12-1966
Lee, Mrs. Opal Taylor The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-17, 11-18-1989
Lee, Mrs. Pearl Allen The Winchester Sun   Tues., 4-15-2003
Lee, Mrs. Ruth McCormick

Lawrence

The Winchester Sun   Thur., 5-27, 5-28-1993
Lee, Mrs. Sarah AVON-Died, at the home of her son, G. W. Lee, Tuesday night, Mrs. Sarah Lee. For several months she had been a sufferer of stomach trouble. Her remains were interred in the Winchester Cemetery.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, November 19, 1897.

Lee, Mrs. Susan R. Died, in Franklin county, of typhoid fever, Mrs. Susan R. Lee, aged 55 years. She was a native of this county, being a daughter of John and Melinda Warren, who formerly resided here.

The Winchester Democrat     Wed., 5-16-1888

Lee, Mrs. Vina Walters The Winchester Sun   Fri., 9-16-1949
Lee, Mrs. Vinnie The Winchester Sun   Sat., 3-1-1947
Lee, Mrs. Vinnie                   AA The Winchester Sun   Wed., 3-3-1937
Lee, Mrs. Virgie T. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-27-2000
Lee, Nancy Venters The Winchester Sun   Thur., 9-30-1999
Lee, Noah The Winchester Sun   Fri., 3-30, 3-31-1990
Lee, Otto The Winchester Sun     Fri., 8-18-1933
Lee, Otto             (Evarts victim) The Winchester Sun   Tues., 11-17, 11-24, 11-27, 11-28, 11-30, 12-1, 12-2, 12-4, 12-7, 12-10, 12-17, 12-29, 12-30-1931
Lee, Parker Donald The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-24-1927
Lee, Pete The Winchester Sun   Wed., 10-9-1968
Lee, Polly                               AA Bourbon; Died—Polly Lee aged 66, on Thursday last. Polly Lee was a widely-known colored woman.

The Democrat   Wednesday June 5, 1889

Lee, Promise Joseph The Winchester Sun   Fri., 5-31-1957
Lee, Rita Gay The Winchester Sun   Wed., 7-8-2009
Lee, Robert (Lee) The Winchester Sun Mon., 3-9-1981
Lee, Robert E. A Little Bit of History

Gen. Robert E. Lee was born in 1808, graduated from West Point in 1829, and died Oct. 12, 1870.   He was buried beneath the chapel of the University of Lexington, Va.

The Winchester Democrat     Wed., 7-13-1892

 

Lee’s Birthday

Robert E. Lee was born Jan. 19, 1802 and died Oct. 12, 1870. He deserves to be classed with our greatest American citizens. On account of his distinguished character and especially because of his services as Commander-In-Chief of the Confederate forces during the Civil War, the Ex-Confederates and the Daughters of the Confederacy observe the day of his birth. The exercises this year will be held in the Courthouse next Thirsday at 1 p. m. Capt. Leeland Hathaway will deliver the address.

The Sun-Sentinel   Thur., Jan. 12, 1905

Lee, Robert E. A double existence

On June 6th, Judge Robert E. Lee, of Louisa, committed suicide by taking morphine, at Huntington, W.Va. He had come to Louisa sixteen years before, studied law and had been successful in politics. Nothing was known of his early life. It has just been found out that he was Robert Weaver, of Fleming county, who disappeared about that time. He attended Kentucky Wesleyan College for three years and took a course of study intended to fit him for the ministry. He leaves a wife and six children.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, July 31, 1908

Lee, Roy The Winchester Sun   Sat., 11-1-1952
Lee, Roy Jr. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 9-5-1998
Lee, Russell The Winchester Sun   Mon., 6-25-1923
Lee, Sam D. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 6-10-1964
Lee, Sim                                AA To Be Hung

Thomas Stout was on Friday sentenced to be hung by a Lexington jury for the murder of Sim Lee.   Five prisoners are in the Lexington jail under sentence of death.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Jan. 16, 1906

 

Another Hanging Due

The Court of Appeals has affirmed the decision of the Fayette Circuit Court which gave Tom Stout the death penalty for killing Sim Lee in that county. Both are negroes and fell out over a tobacco crop in which they were partners. Gov. Beckham will fix the date of the execution.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., June 11, 1906

 

Another hanging

Lexington will have another hanging today. Thomas Stout, a negro, will be hung for the murder of Thomas Lee, another negro.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, November 23, 1906

 

Hung for murder

Thomas Stout, Jr., a negro aged twenty-four years, was hung at Lexington Friday for the murder of Sim Lee, another negro. Stout claimed to the last that he killed Lee in self-defense.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, November 27, 1906

 

Young mother

Accused of murder, collapsed when murderer marched to his death

Lexington, Ky., – As pathetic as was the execution of Thomas Stout in the yard of the county jail, there was a scene enacted on the third floor of the jail building that brought tears to the eyes of even the experienced sheriff and his deputies. As the death march began from Stout’s cell to the gallows, the wails of a young woman were heard by the officers, and Holt was made for a moment to ascertain the origin of the sounds. They were the cries of Mrs. Etta Griffiths, wife of Nolan Griffiths, herself under indictment for the murder of her 15-month-old-babe. Mrs. Griffiths occupied a cell on the third floor, directly overlooking the jail yard, and since the workman began the erection of the scaffold on which Stout was to meet his doom Mrs. Griffiths has been in a state of almost total collapse. As Stout and the guards passed from the jail to the gallows Mrs. Griffiths was removed to the cell vacated by the doomed man in order that she would not see nor hear the drop. Mrs. Griffiths was arrested on a warrant sworn out by her husband’s mother, charging her with murder, and the recent grand jury found a true bill against her. Stout was executed for the murder of Sim Lee, committed several months ago.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, December 4, 1906

Lee, Stephen D. Confederate leader dead

Gen. Stephen D. Lee died Thursday at Vicksburg, Miss., aged 75 years. He was Commander-in-Chief of the United Confederate Veterans, and his death leaves only two Lieut. Generals of the Confederacy living, Simon Boliver Buckner, of this state, and Alexander Stewart, of Tennessee.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, June 2, 1908

Lee, Vernon The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-3, 4-6-1939
Lee, W. H. F. GEN. W. H. F. Lee, son of Gen. Robert E. Lee, died Wednesday last at his home in Fairfax county, Virginia. He had represented his district in Congress for two terms and was member elect of the next House.

The Democrat, Wednesday, October 14, 1891.

Lee, Will                               AA The Winchester Sun   Thur., 12-27-1934
Lee, William Released on Bond.

HARLAN, Ky., Dec. 16.-John Taylor, charged with killing Wm. Lee, and a woman on Puckett’s creek was held in $ 1,000. Taylor pleaded self defense.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, December 20, 1898.

Lee, William Ford The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-25, 3-26-1985
Lee, Willie                           AA Will Pryor, a Negro boy aged about 17 years, shot and killed Willie Lee, another colored boy about the same age, at the Lexington race track Monday. Both were employed atone of the stables at the track, and while playing with a gun Pryor claims to have accidentally pulled the trigger which resulted in Lee’s death. The coroner’s jury returned a verdict of accidental death.

The Democrat, Wednesday, March 23, 1892.

Lee, Wilmont Gay The Winchester Sun   Sat., 10-2-1993
Leech, Mrs. Eliza Ellen The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-14, 10-15-1957
Leech, Richard The Winchester Sun,   Thurs., 5-5-1921
Leeds, Pulaski Honor Their Chief

Louisville, Ky, July 11

Five hundred L. & N. shopmen arrived Friday on a special train from Montgomery, Birmingham, Nashville, Mobile and other cities to attend the funeral of Pulaski Leeds, the murdered superintendent of machinery. Twenty-five hundred L. & N. employees and Knightstemplars marched in the funeral procession.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., July 17, 1903

Leedy, David The last will and testament of David Leedy dec. was produced in open court and proven according to law by the oaths of A. L. Parks and John Pace witnesses thereto and ordered to be recorded

Order Book 10; P. 194; August Court 1834

Leedy, Owen Verdict Of Guilty

Grayson, Ky., June 15

The trial of George Davis late marshal of Grayson, for the killing of Owen Leedy while attempting to make an arrest for disorderly conduct one year ago, resulted in a verdict of guilty with a five year penitentiary sentence.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., June 19, 1903

Leeft, James Bratton The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-29-1913
Leer, J. Monroe DIED- J. Monroe Leer, a prominent and wealthy stockman of Bourbon county, died Saturday, aged about fifty years.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, December 25, 1894.

Leer, Mrs. Adelia Ewing The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-29-1924
Leer, Mrs. Florence Watson The Winchester Sun   Tues., 6-23-1931
Lees, Mrs. Susan Kentucky Bequests.

Mrs. Susan Lees, who died last week in New York left ten thousand dollars to the school at Jackson and five thousand each to Misses Mary and Letitia Bullock, of Lexington. The bulk of her fortune, amounting to $150,000, was left to the wife of former Congressman, Clifton R. Breckinridge, of Arkansas.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, March 14, 1902

Leet, Camden The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-15-1923
Leet, daughter Accidentally Killed His Daughter

LaGrange, Ky., Nov. 23

J. N. Leet Tuesday afternoon started hunting, when his gun was accidentally discharged. The entire load of shot struck his daughter in the temple, killing her instantly. She was 19 years old.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Nov. 28, 1899

 

In Oldhan county, J. N. Leet, who had just returned from hunting, was adjusting the hammer of a gun, when the weapon was discharged killing his 19-year-old daughter.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Dec. 1, 1899

Leffingwell, D. A. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 8-9-1922
Leffingwell, Mrs. Adeline The Winchester Sun   Wed., 8-9-1922
Leffler, Prentiss Blackburn The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-9, 8-1-1993
Leforee, William Motion of Jane Leforee widow of William Leforee decd. and David Whee certificate is granted them for obtaining letters of administration of the estate of William Leforee decd. with George Stevinson security.

Order Book 4; P. 278-279; October Court 1808

 

Order for the appraisal of the slaves if any and personal estate of William Leforee decd.

Order Book 4; P. 279; October Court 1808

 

Ordered that Jane Leforee widow of William Leforee be appointed guardian to the infant orphans of William Leforee decd. with George Stevensons and David Whee security.

Order Book 4; P. 289; November Court 1808

 

Inventory and appraisal of the estate of William Leforee decd. ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 4; P. 312; February Court 1809

Leftwich, Mrs. Mabel Terrill The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-1-1939
Legan, John John Legan, of Xenis, O., who has just died, had a peculiar peculiarity. He would allow no living thing on his place but himself and went so far as to poison the birds that come to his trees.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, November 2, 1894.

Leggett, Arthur C. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-3-1979
Leggett, Mrs. Alpha The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-1, 8-2-1994
Leggett, Mrs. Reatha Gibson The Winchester Sun   Wed., 10-25, 10-26-2000
Leggett, Rolla Clay The Winchester Sun   Tues., 5-26-1987
Leggitt, Mrs. Margaret The Winchester Sun Mon., 5-25-1953
Legon, Frank IN Owen county, Lige Gibson, who brutally murdered Frank Legon, was taken from jail Thursday night and hanged to a tree.

The Democrat, Wednesday, February 3, 1892.

Lehman, C. H. The Winchester Sun   Thurs., 8-29-1918
Lehman, Gilbert The Winchester Sun   Tues., 12-28-1948
Lehman, Mrs. Chas. W. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 12-2-1942
Lehman, Mrs. Elizabeth Mertz The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-19-1932
Lehman, Mrs. Jane Blackburn The Winchester Sun Mon., 9-28-1981
Lehman, William George Jr. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-21-1979
Leibold, George Supposed Heat Victim

Louisville, Ky., July 19

George Leibold, a tailor, was found dead in his room Thursday, having expired from heat, presumably 48 hours before.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., July 23, 1901

Leigh, A. W. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 11-29, 12-3, 12-6, 12-17-1932, Sat., 4-1, 4-11, 4-12, 4-13, 4-26, 4-27-1933
Leigh, Charles The Winchester Sun   Tues., 9-13-1927
Leight, Mrs. Inza B. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 3-21-1996
Leighton, Mrs. Evo Frances

MacMorris

The Winchester Sun   Wed., 12-31-1913
Leisure, Reuben A. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 1-9-1935
Leisure, Thomas Almost Reached Shore. Believed by some friends that he did not try to reach it. Owensboro, Ky., April 17 – Did Thomas Leisure want to have a reconciliation with his wife? This is the question which is being asked by those who saw him drown in Rough river. Some time ago Leisure separated from his young wife. Friends have been endeavoring to restore peaceful relations between the two, but not until recently did they succeed in obtaining the consent of the young man to return to his wife’s home and talk over their differences together. To reach the home it was necessary for him to cross Rough river. The high waters of the spring had washed away the bridges and Leisure had about decided to abandon his visit when he suddenly exclaimed that he would swim across the river. He could see his wife’s home and she was awaiting his coming, willing for the reconciliation. He removed his coat and plunged into the water. When within 10 feet of the opposite shore he called to his friends on the bank that he was drowning. Without struggling he sank and did not rise. His body was recovered. It is believed by some of the friends that he did not try to reach the shore.

The Winchester Democrat Friday, April 20, 1906

Lelper, Mrs. George A. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 6-17-1937
Leman, Francis M. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 9-22-1923
Lemaster, Alex Supposed Murderer Arrested.

Thomas Bailey was arrested at Farmers Friday upon the charge of murdering Alex Leemaster at Sherburne recently. There was a reward of $150 for him.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, March 11, 1902

 

Thomas Bailey Acquitted

Owingsville, Ky., Oct. 17

The jury trying Thomas Bailey for killing Alex Lemaster at Sherburne last February last February, after being out one hour, returned a verdict of acquittal. Bailey accused Lemaster of intimacy with Mrs. Bailey and meeting him shot him four times.

Winchester Sentinel   Wed., Oct. 22, 1902

Lemaster, Orville The Winchester Sun   Tues., 8-6-1935
Lemasters, Hamilton In Johnson county, Hamilton Lemasters, while chopping wood caught his ax in a grapevine and split his skull entirely open, dying instantly.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, April 23, 1897

Lemen, Mrs. J. G. Deaths.

Wm. J. Bryan in the commoner: “A noble woman passed from earth when Mrs. J. G. Lemen of Council Bluffs, Iowa, died. She was matron of the Christian Home at Council Bluffs, of which her husband, Rev. J. G. Lemen, is manager. For years Rev. and Mrs. Lemen devoted their lives to caring for unfortunate little ones, and their sacrifices and devotion to their work stamped them as zealous Christians. Hundreds of little ones have been rescued from misery and saved from lives of sin by the efforts of Rev. and Mrs. Lemen. During all the years of their management of the Christian Home they never asked a dollar from the public, but depended upon the free and unsolicited offerings of those who understand the work they are doing. And it is a credit to the Christian fellowship of the generation that the faith of this good man and wife has never been shaken, and that their prayers have been abundantly answered. The death of “Mama” Lemen, as she was affectionately known to thousands, is a great loss to charitable circles.”

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, October 7, 1902

Lemley, Donald The Winchester Sun   Fri., 8-30-1940
Lemley, Etta At Warrington, West Virginia, Etta Lemley, fourteen years old, was shot through the left breast and instantly killed by her sister Lotta, sixteen years old. The girls had been playing with an empty shot-gun, but set it down and went out for an hour. During that time their brother loaded it and put it where he had found it. The girls came back, and Etta said “Shoot me again, Lotta.” Lotta pulled the trigger and Etta fell dead, with a load of shot through her heart.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, June 1, 1894

Lemming, J. E. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 7-21-1928
Lemmons, Dave Charles Smith killed Dave Lemmons in Harrison county because he persisted in coming to his house and having fits.

The Democrat   Wednesday April 3, 1889

Lemmons, Harrison His Body Was Badly Mangled

Owensboro, Ky., Oct. 20

Harrison Lemmons, the 10-year-old son of Calvin W. Lemmons, was crushed to death by a Henderson route freight train. The boy was hanging on a step of a box car and he lost his hold and fell under the wheels. His head and both legs were cut entirely off.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Oct. 23, 1903

Lemmons, Thos. Thos. Lemmons of Harrison county stuck a nail in his foot and died of blood poisoning in a few days.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, June 21, 1893

Lemon, Annie B. Combs The Winchester Sun   Fri., 6-4-1915
Lemon, engineer The Winchester Sun Tues., 11-26-1912
Lemon, Henry Soldiers Killed by a Premature Explosion.

Middlesboro, Ky., Nov. 24.—Charles Nikirk and Henry Lemon, formerly privates in the 2nd Kentucky regiment, were killed Wednesday afternoon by the premature explosion of dynamite at the Limestone quarries near here. Others were Hurt.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, November 29, 1898

Lemon, James R. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 10-12-1921
Lemon, Mrs. Dorothy Ilene The Winchester Sun   Thur., 8-31, 9-1-2000
Lemon, Mrs. Nettie Morse The Winchester Sun   Tues., 3-4-1941
LeMond, Mrs. Mary S. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 7-23, 7-24-1968
Lemons, Steven Eugene The Winchester Sun   Wed., 11-4-1992
Lenahen, Daniel Deaths

Mr. Daniel Lenahen died at his home in Paris Monday. The funeral was held Wednesday morning. Mr. Lenahen lived for many years near North Middletown, and had many relatives and friends in this county who will learn of his death with regret.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., March 9, 1906

 

Messrs. John P. Conway and T. L. Nunan attended the funeral of Daniel Lenahen at Paris Wednesday.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., March 9, 1906

Lenehen, Mr. ___________ John P. Conway and T. L. and John F. Nunan, attended the funeral of Mr. Lenehen at Paris, Wednesday.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., July 3, 1903

Lenkenfelt, Green Isaac Shelby, Jr., was acquitted at Danville of the killing of Green Lenkenfelt at Junction City, two years ago.

The Democrat, Wednesday, March 16, 1892.

Lennon, James The Winchester Sun Sat., 11-9-1912
Lenox, John

 

THE WAR OF 1812 – Private

The Roll of Two Companies Raised in Clark County by Capt. James Sympson.

Company of Mounted Kentucky Volunteers under the Command of Capt. James Sympson. Left Winchester September 15th, 1814, and arrived at Urbana, Ohio on the 20th.

The Semi-Weekly Sun     Fri., 2-21-1879

Lentini, Frank Anthony The Winchester Sun   Wed., 11-24-1965
Leob, Gus GUS Leob and his wife, Julia, Hebrew peddles, were murdered in Harlan county, between Harlan Courthouse and Harrogate, Tenn., by six masked men. Robbery was the only cause for the crime.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, June 28, 1895.

Leob, Julia GUS Leob and his wife, Julia, Hebrew peddles, were murdered in Harlan county, between Harlan Courthouse and Harrogate, Tenn., by six masked men. Robbery was the only cause for the crime.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, June 28, 1895.

Leomon, _____ An indenture of apprenticeship from John Leomon infant orphan of ___Leomon decd. to Pleas H. Gardner was ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 4 P.? January 1805

Leonard, Atf. Six years ago T. Vaughn mysteriously disappeared from his home near Manchester. Eighteen months ago Atf. Leonard, a well-to-do farmer committed suicide by hanging himself in his barn, and it now transpires that Leonard murdered Vaughn for $600, and buried his body in a dense thicket and the matter weighing heavily on his mind caused him to take his life.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, March 5, 1895

Leonard, Charles THE WAR OF 1812 – Private

The Roll of Two Companies Raised in Clark County by Capt. James Sympson.

Company of Mounted Kentucky Volunteers under the Command of Capt. James Sympson. Left Winchester September 15th, 1814, and arrived at Urbana, Ohio on the 20th.

The Semi-Weekly Sun     Fri., 2-21-1879

Leonard, Frank The Winchester Sun,   Wed., 3-23-1921
Leonard, Garnett The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-18-1937
Leonard, Jeffery David The Winchester Sun   Fri., 2-19-1988
Leonard, Jerry F. Jr. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-29-2002
Leonard, John Died—John Leonard, a stone contractor, who has done considerable work in this city, died Friday at his home in Lexington.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, February 15, 1898

Leonard, Mrs. Charles T. CONDENSED NEWS     Louis Harriot, the slayer of Mrs. Charles T. Leonard, who is now incarcerated in the county jail at Freehold, NJ for the foul crime he committed near Atlantic Highlands last week has at last confessed to having committed the dastardly crime.

The Democrat, Friday, December 4, 1891.

Leonard, Mrs. Willie S. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 3-23-1938
Leonard, William The Winchester Sun Wed., 12-18-1912
Leonhard, Mrs. Bessie Haggard The Winchester Sun Mon., 5-1-1978
Leonx, Ernest T. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 10-9-1973
Lepp, baby Deaths

The three days’ old child of Mr. and Mrs. M. W. Lepp, of Ford, was buried in the cemetery here yesterday afternoon.

The Sun-Sentinel   Thur., April 21, 1904

Lepp, daughter Ford

Died, on the 21st inst., the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. W. Lepp

The Sun-Sentinel   Thur., Oct. 26, 1905

LeRoy, Kent Robert The Winchester Sun   Tues., 6-9, 6-10-1987
LeRoy, Warner The Winchester Sun   Sat., 2-24-2001
Leslie, Arthur The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-13, 9-14-1926
Leslie, Brandon Matthew The Winchester Sun   Fri., 5-12-2006

Scobee Funeral Home Web Site Thur., 5-11-2006

Leslie, Mrs. Mary Womack The Winchester Sun Wed., 1-6-1943
Lesmeyer, child The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-2-1928
Lester, Mrs. Lucille Gabhart The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-30-1979
Lester, Mrs. Mildred E. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 6-15-1962
Lester, O. W. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 9-29-1925
Lester, Richard The Winchester Sun   Wed., 6-13-1928
Lester, S. E. The Winchester Sun     Mon., 8-14-1933
Lester, William Stewart The Winchester Sun   Sat., 2-15-1958
Letcher, Roberta Evelyn The Winchester Sun   Tues., 9-20-1927
Letcher, Sam A COUPLE of months ago Dr. Sam Letcher, a prominent physician of Richmond, fell from a second-story window, and Sunday night died from the effects of the fall.

The Democrat, Wednesday, October 7, 1891.

Letcher, Susie                         AA The Winchester Sun   Sat., 11-7-1914
Lethers, James The Winchester Sun Sat., 7-6-1912
Lethers, Richard (Dick)         AA The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-20-1920
Letton, J. H. Clark County Republican Fri. 11-24-1916

The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-27-1916

Letton, James                         AA The Winchester Sun   Wed., 6-22-1927
Letton, John Mrs. Belle Letton, nee Benton, widow of Rev. John Letton, of Millersburg, and Jacob S. Syopaugh, of Denver, Colorado, were married by Rev. E. G. B. Mann, Wednesday afternoon at the latter’s residence in Paris. The bride is a daughter of Rev. W. T. Benton, of Cynthiana.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Jan. 23, 1900

Letton, John Will Died—The following aged persons died in the vicinity of Paris the first of the week: Joseph Taylor, aged ninety, died Saturday at Kenner Station; Mrs. Bettie Jordan, ninety-three, died Monday night in that city at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Jacob Schwartz; John Will Letton, seventy-four, died Sunday near Jackstown; Miss Bettie Montague, fifty-five, died Monday. Nine children survive Mr. Letton.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, October 25, 1895

Letton, Lilly The Winchester Sun   Thur., 8-30-1951
Letton, Mrs. Ada Sanders The Winchester Sun   Tues., 1-17, 1-18-1967
Letton, Mrs. Florence Longmoor Peculiar Accident to a Kentucky Central Train.

A special from Paris Monday give the following account of a peculiar accident that happened to a north-bound train. “The passenger train on the Kentucky Central branch of the Louisville and Nashville, which passed here at 7:58 o’clock this morning, caught fire when near Talbot station, three miles from this city. The smoking-car was destroyed, and several passengers were badly injured. A plumber had placed a can of gasoline by the door next the baggage car, and M.H. Applegate, the newsboy, lit a cigarette and threw the match down, not noticing the can. Some oil on the outside caught fire, and Wm. Tar, who sat near the door opened it and attempted to kick the can out, but knocked the stopper out, and the oil caught fire and enveloped the car in flames. Men rushed for the doors and some jumped through the windows, but not until the train had stopped. The most seriously burned are G. C. Lockhart, the L. and N. attorney, William Tarr, the distiller, Dr. John W. Jameson, John W. McShain, County Assessor, Robert Goggon, drummer for the Power Wholesale Grocery Company, all of Paris, M. H. Applegate, newsboy of Cincinnati, William Ballenger, of Kiserton and Red Crawford of Louisville, it was a miracle that no one was killed.   Mr. Crawford’s hand was badly burned by helping to get the corpse of Mrs. Florence Longmoor Letton from the baggage car, the remains being on their way to Covington for burial.”

The Democrat, Wednesday, March 1, 1893.

Letton, Paul The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-20-1973
Letton, Robert W. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-14-1994
Leudenburg, Mrs. Hannah The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-17-1966
Levi, George S. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 7-28-1934
Levi, Willis Louisville, Ky., – Capt. Willis Levi, 73, a pioneer resident of this city, former steam       boat and fire department captain, died at his residence here from a sudden attack of organic heart disease.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, December 28, 1909

Levine, Mose The Winchester Sun   Mon., 1-1-1923
Levine, Mrs. Sara Lou Young The Winchester Sun   Tues., 9-3-1996
Levisee, son The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-23-1929
Levy, Betty     (aka Betty Tevis) The Winchester Sun Mon., 12-13-1920
Levy, Charles The Winchester Sun Mon., 4-14-1913
Levy, Elizabeth Death Of A Religeuse

Sister Christina, known in the world as Miss Elizabeth Levy, died at the convent of the Franciscan Sisters at Oldenberg, Ind., Tuesday, after a long illness. She had been a member of the Franciscan Order for thirty-four years and was a sister of Mrs. Maggie Devereaux, of this city, who will attend the funeral at Oldenburg this morning.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Feb. 7, 1902

Levy, Joseph The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-3-1964
Levy, Mary Louise The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-13-1916
Levy, Morris B. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 8-13-1931
Levy, mother The Winchester Sun   Thur., 1-26-1928
Levy, Mrs. Esther The Winchester Sun     Sat., 10-28-1933
Levy, Mrs. Jennie The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-16-1955
Lewallen, James Richard Ware vs. James Lewallen …….Equity

Order Book 10; P. 221; July Court 1859

Lewey, George E. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-13-1945
Lewis, _____ W. D. Jackson bought last week the house belonging to the Lewis Heirs opposite the residence of T. F. Phillips on Lexington Avenue for $3,300

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, November 12, 1895

Lewis, ________ Peggy Lewis vs. Henry C. Lewis administrator

Order Book 14; P. 17; May Court 1870

Lewis, Albert Killed By A Train

Owingsville, Ky., Feb. 27

While returning from church in Salt Lick, Bath county, Albert Lewis, 21 attempted to board a moving train, fell under the wheels and was killed. Lewis spent the evening in prayer. He was to have been married in a few days.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., March 2, 1906

Lewis, Allen John W. Pace has been convicted of the killing of Allen Lewis in Owsley county and sentenced to 15 years. The same court acquitted Captain Kingler of complicity in the

Murder of Hon. W.P. Beatty.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, July 14, 1896

Lewis, Alpheus William Lewis vs. Theodosia A. Lewis

To deliver to Theodosia A. Lewis widow of Alpheus Lewis dec., lands…. Report amount received by children ….son Alpheus and amount to heirs   -continued

Order Book 12; P. 201; July Court 1865

 

Report of settlement with admin. filed ..trustees report of advancements filed

Order Book 12; P. 225; November Court 1865

 

Report of allotment of dower filed

Order Book 12; P. 228; November Court 1865

 

William Lewis &c against Theodore A. Lewis ……..Equity

The Commissioners ………divide among the heirs the balance of the land of the decedent Alpheus Lewis left after the dower therein was allotted ………..William Lewis the admin. ………Nancie Lewis entitled ………..Sophia Lewis is entitled ………Tuppen Lewis is entitled ………continued.

Order Book 12; P. 375; May Court 1866

 

Alpheus Lewis administrator vs. Alpheus Lewis Jr.

Orders filed…appointing attorney…..recorded.

Order Book 14; P. 367; May Court 1872

 

Alpheus Lewis administrator vs. Alpheus Lewis Jr.

…Alpheus Lewis Jr. as one of the heirs at law of Alpheus Lewis decd. in the dower assigned to Theodocia Lewis in the lands of her dead husband….Master Commissioner is directed to make sale…cause continued.

Order Book 14; P. 558; November Court 1872

 

William Lewis administrator of A. Lewis vs. A. Lewis Jr. & co.

…commissioner to transfer to L. T Lewis the interest of Alpheus Lewis Jr. in the land assigned to Theodosia Lewis as dower in the lands of her decd. husband Alpheus Lewis….

Order Book 17; P. 38; May Court 1878

 

Alpheus Lewis Administrator vs. A. Lewis Jr. & co.

….deed to Tupper Lewis….making said to be paid by said Lewis….

Order Book 17; P. 56; May Court 1878

Lewis, Ann Will Book 2, Page 20

Dated: No date
Recorded; November 22, 1886

Lewis, Anna Cornelia The Winchester Sun   Thur., 8-1-1957
Lewis, Arch The Winchester Sun   Fri., 12-1-1939
Lewis, Asa K. Among the “Prominent old Families of Kentucky” in the Industrial American we find the following sketch of a noted Clark county man. Asa K. Lewis, was educated at Transylvania University, and afterward graduated at Princeton, also graduating in Law there. He was a man of more than ordinary talent and ability with very refined and polished manners, and was very popular. He practiced law for a few years in Mt. Sterling, Ky., and was afterwards Judge of the County Court of Clark County for several years, but finally retired to his farm in that county and could not be induced to hold any political office, contending that he was disgusted with political affairs and professional business. He owned and resided on a large and excellent farm about six miles north of Winchester, in Clark County; being a one-fourth interest in the 3,600 acres purchased by his father, Thomas Lewis, from Gest. He was a Major in the War of 1872 and displayed great bravery in the military service especially at Dudley’s defeat, where he took a very prominent part and gained distinction for courage and skill.

The Democrat, Wednesday, February 15, 1893.

 

Died in Arkansas.

Near Helena, Arkansas last Monday, Mrs. Sarah Lipscomb died, aged about seventy years. She was a native of this county, a daughter of the late Asa Lewis. Her husband, Josiah Lipscomb, was from Madison county and was a brother of the late Squire Nathan Lipscomb, of this county. She was a most estimable woman and highly regarded to all who knew her.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, December 27, 1898.

Lewis, Asa K. On the motion of Hector Lewis and Mat M. Clay who made oath thereto as the law directs certificate is granted them for obtaining letters of administration on the estate of Asa K. Lewis dec. in due form giving security whereupon they   together with Alfheus Lewis and Benjamin C. Gay Sr., entered into and acknowledged their bond …………..penalty of $35,000 ……..directs. widow of decedent waiving all right to   administer by letter produced to court.

Order Book 12; P. 308; August Court 1850

 

On the motion of Hector Lewis and Mat M. Clay administrators of the estate of Asa K. Lewis dec. ordered that James R. Wornall, William R. Duncan, Eli Bean and Sam M. Taylor or any three of them after being first sworn be and are hereby appointed appraisers to appraise the personal estate and slaves if any…………….Asa K. Lewis dec. …….report.

Order Book 12; P. 309; August Court 1850

 

On the motion of Margaret Lewis widow of Asa K. Lewis dec. ordered that James r. Wornall, William R. Duncan, Eli Bean and Sam M. Taylor or any three of them after being first sworn …………appointed commissioners to allot to said Margaret Lewis her dower………….estate of her said deceased husband Asa K. Lewis and make report ……….

Order Book 12; P. 309; August Court 1850

 

Ordered that Mat M. Clay be appointed guardian of the estate of Henry C. Lewis infant orphan of Asa K. Lewis deceased giving security whereupon he together with John Martin entered into and acknowledged their bond to the Commonwealth of Ky in the penalty of $13000 conditioned according to law.

Order Book; P. 309; August Court 1850

 

Ordered that Hector Lewis be appointed guardian to the estate of Sydney Lewis infant orphan of Asa K. Lewis dec. giving security……….penalty of $12000………….

Order Book; P. 309; August Court 1850

 

On motion of Matt M. Clay and his wife Mary Clay who is one of the daughters and heirs of Asa K. Lewis dec. the said Matt Clay being one of the administrators. ….ordered that James Wornall, Eli Bean, William R. Duerson and Sam M. Taylor be appointed commissioners ……divide …….estate …….among the heirs ……..report to   court.

Order Book; P. 315; October Court 1850

 

Report of division of land and negroes belonging to the estate of Asa K. Lewis dec. was produced in court approved of and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 12; P. 343; December Court 1850

 

Sale bill of the estate of Asa K. Lewis dec. was produced in court approved of and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 12; P. 344; December Court 1850

 

Inventory of the estate of Asa K. Lewis dec. was produced in court approved of and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 12; P. 344; December Court 1850

 

Final settlement with Hector Lewis and M. M. Clay administrators of Asa K. Lewis dec. was produced …………filed.

Order Book 12; P. 408; October Court 1851

Again produced …..approved …..recorded.

Order Book 12; P. 415; November Court 1851

 

Settlement with the guardian of Henry C. Lewis was produced ………filed.

Order Book 12; P. 474; June 1852

Again produced ……..approved ……recorded.

Order Book 12; P. 478; July Court 1852

 

Settlement with the guardian of Sidney C. Lewis was produced …….filed ……

Order Book 12; P. 574; July Court 1853

Again produced ……….approved …….recorded.

Order Book 12; P. 577; August Court 1853

Lewis, Asa K. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 6-24-1916
Lewis, Asa K. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 5-8-1928
Lewis, Ashton Raye The Winchester Sun   Sat., 12-20, 12-22-1997
Lewis, B. A. The Winchester Sun     Fri., 8-25-1933
Lewis, Betty The Winchester Sun Mon., 6-25-2007
Lewis, Betty Jeter The Winchester Sun   Tues., 9-17-2002
Lewis, Bill Madison; Bill Lewis sent to the penitentiary from Richmond, died in prison.

The Democrat, Wednesday, June 11, 1890

Lewis, Bishop Charles The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-27-1970
Lewis, boy The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-9-1916
Lewis, Burt Maysville – Burt Lewis was found beside the tracks of the C & O in the outskirts of     this city, with his head crushed and left side badly mangled. It is supposed he was hit by   a freight train.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, October 11, 1910

Lewis, C. B. C. B. Lewis, (M. Quad) late of the Detroit Free Press, has accepted a position on the New York World at a salary of $15,000 a year. Mr. Lewis was a passenger on the ill-fated steamer Magnolia, which exploded both her boilers on March 18th, 1869, just above Cincinnati. He was en route to this city at that time to accept the position of Editor of the Bulletin at a salary of $15 per week.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, April 22,1891

Lewis, Cain                           AA Bourbon Circuit Court is in session this week. D. L. Pendleton, of the Winchester bar, has been in attendance. Cain Lewis, colored, who was sentenced to be hung for the murder of his wife, but whose case was reversed by the Court of Appeals, will be tried again this week.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, March 18, 1898

Lewis, Charles In the Danville Circuit Court Jas. Bailey, colored, for killing Charles Lewis, was given six years in the penitentiary. Jordan Carter, a white man, confessed to horse stealing and got one year. James Madison and Sam Tucker, for house breaking, were given two years each.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, April 27, 1897

Lewis, Charles The Winchester Sun   Wed., 8-18, 8-19-1948
Lewis, children Four of the eight children of J. W. Lewis, a prominent farmer of Lester county, have died within the last week of typhoid fever.

The Winchester Democrat.   Tuesday, February 16, 1897.

Lewis, Clarence Allen The Winchester Sun   Tues., 11-17, 11-18-1970
Lewis, Clarence Raymond The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-16-1993
Lewis, Clifton N. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 3-2-1994
Lewis, Clyde The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-11-1978
Lewis, Dan (Winding Ball) The Winchester Sun   Fri., 9-29, 9-30-1916
Lewis, David E. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 4-25-1946, 4-23-1947, 4-23-1948, 4-23-1949, 4-24-1950, 4-23-1951, 4-23-1952, 4-23-1953, 4-23-1954, 4-23-1955, 4-23-1956
Lewis, David II The Winchester Sun   Wed., 12-27, 12-28, 12-29-1989
Lewis, Davis T. Winchester Sun Wed.   8-28, 8-31-1912
Lewis, Donald The Winchester Sun Mon., 3-16-2009
Lewis, Douglas Wayne (Doug) The Winchester Sun   Fri., 5-9-2003
Lewis, E. T. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 2-9-1944
Lewis, Ed The Winchester   Sun   Wed., 5-24-1933
Lewis, Ed. Acquitted of a Murder Charge.

Lexington, Ky., Sept. 2.—Ten days ago Dick Waters killed Ed Lewis with a pistol at a dance. Thursday Waters was acquitted of a charge of murder.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, September 6, 1898

Lewis, Emil Eugene The Winchester Sun   Mon., 1-18-1999
Lewis, Emmett The Winchester Sun   Sat., 4-11, 4-13-1953
Lewis, Everett C. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 5-28-1942
Lewis, Florence                     AA Florence Lewis, colored, died Monday of obstruction of the bowels, caused by injuries received in an elevator during the colored excursion to Cincinnati Thursday.

The Winchester Democrat     Wed., 10-2-1889

Lewis, Floyd The Winchester Sun   Tues., 11-8-1927
Lewis, Frank Clay The Winchester Sun   Sat., 6-18-1921
Lewis, Fred The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-13, 9-14, 9-15, 9-16-1937
Lewis, G. R. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 9-25-1935
Lewis, Gale The Winchester Sun   Mon., 6-18-1934
Lewis, George M. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 5-27-1944
Lewis, George W. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 8-30-1916
Lewis, George W. Sr. John Lindsey vs. George W. Lewis administrator

….cause continued…

Order Book 17; P. 205; May Court 1879

 

John Lindsey vs. George W. Lewis administrator

Defendant filed an amended answer and G. W. Lewis and L. C. Lewis filed an answer to the amended petition…..

Order Book 17; P. 382; May Court 1880

 

John Lindsey vs. G. W. Lewis administrator

Plaintiff moved the court to strike from the file the three answers filed.

Order Book 17; P. 398; May Court 1880

 

John Lindsey vs. G. W. Lewis administrator

…..plaintiff swore to and filed a reply to the answer of Lydia C. Lewis…..defendant has in his hands that sum belonging to the estate of G. W. Lewis Sr. …

Order Book 17; P. 425; May Court 1880

Lewis, George Washington The Winchester Sun   Mon., 6-27-1921
Lewis, Gill The Winchester Sun   Tues., 11-8-1927
Lewis, Hector Age 5, male, he was born in Clark County, KY, his father was Alpheus Lewis, he died in Stoner Creek, January 2, 1853 of scarlet fever.

CCKD

Lewis, Henry The body of the young man found dead near London, Laurel county, has been identified as that of Henry Lewis, a young school teacher and preacher of Lewis county.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, November 29, 1893

Lewis, Henry The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-23-1925
Lewis, Henry P. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 3-17-1951
Lewis, Henry P. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 9-25, 11-13-1952
Lewis, Hubert P. Died

Hubert P. Lewis died Tuesday at the home of his brother, George W. Lewis, of pneumonia, aged twenty-seven years. The remains were carried to College Hill, Madison county, for interment, the following day. He was a very popular young man and deservedly stood high in the estimation of all who knew him.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., April 20, 1900

Lewis, J. C. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 1-24, 1-25, 2-26-1923
Lewis, J. W. The Winchester Sun     Sat., 9-17-1932
Lewis, James College Hill-The body of James Lewis, who died at Lexington, was buried in the cemetery at this place this week.

The Winchester Democrat     Wed., 7-18-1888

Lewis, James Another Killing In Clay County

London, Ky., Sept. 15

Clay county had another killing outside of the two feuds. James and Sam Lewis began shooting into old man Shell’s house on Spring street, whereupon Shell shot James Lewis 11 times with a Winchester, killing him. Sam Lewis made his escape.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Sept. 19, 1899

Lewis, James C. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 7-5-1929
Lewis, James Chester The Winchester Sun   Sat., 12-28-1935
Lewis, James G. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-31, 9-2, 9-3-1992
Lewis, James H. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 10-18-1929
Lewis, James H. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 6-22-1943
Lewis, James Hogan The Winchester Sun   Mon., 6-27, 6-28-1966
Lewis, James P. The Winchester Sun Thur., 10-18-1934
Lewis, James Rucker The Winchester Sun   Fri., 8-16-1996
Lewis, Joe Montgomery; Dave and Amos Lewis, confined in Mt. Sterling jail were carried to Morgan county to be tried for the murder of their cousin, Joe Lewis. This is their second trial; the first trial resulted in a life sentence, but was reversed by the Court of Appeals.

The Democrat, Friday, April 11, 1890

 

Montgomery; Amos and Dave Lewis who had been confined in Mt. Sterling jail for the killing of their cousin, were tried in the Morgan Circuit Court. The jury hung and they were brought back for safe keeping.

The Winchester Democrat; Wednesday, October 8, 1890

 

Sheriff B. M. Carr, of Morgan county passed through here Tuesday night en route for Frankfort with Dave Lewis , whom he was taking to the penitentiary to serve a life sentence for the murder of Joe. Lewis, which occurred July 18, 1888, the Court of Appeals having refused to grant him a new trial. Amos and Alvin Lewis, charged as parties to the same crime, have not been tried; but it is thought the latter is innocent. Frank Lewis also indicated for same has not been arrested, but the case will be a bad one if it ever comes to a trial. All the above named Lewis’ are also indicted for the murder of old Zeke Auxier’s girl “Liddy Margaret,” whom they and Joe Lewis were accused of murdering a short time previous to the time Joe was killed, and it is thought that he was killed by the others in order to destroy State’s evidence which they believed Joe would give.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, February 11, 1891

Lewis, John The Winchester Sun   Wed., 11-12-1913
Lewis, John The Winchester Sun   Wed., 4-21-1915
Lewis, John The Winchester Sun   Thur., 1-20-1916
Lewis, John F. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 12-23-1937
Lewis, John Jr. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 12-21-1993
Lewis, John Ollie The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-16, 3-17-1964
Lewis, Joseph B. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-11-1925
Lewis, Joseph W. Judge Joseph W. Lewis, four times in the Appellate Court, and in war renowned as Commander of the Orphan Brigade, died suddenly at his home in Scott county.

The Sun-Sentinel   Thur., July 14, 1904

Lewis, Jupiter                       AA Sent to the Grand Jury.

Lexington, Ky., Dec. 7.—Martin Johnson, who with Robert Rowland, confesses to the murder of Jupiter Lewis, Tuesday waived examination in the police court and was sent before the grand jury for indictments.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, December 13, 1898

 

Sentenced for Life.

LEXINGTON, Ky., Dec. 17.-Martin Johnson and Robert Rowland, each of whom accuses the other of the murder of the venerable Negro Jupiter Lewis, were both sentenced to the penitentiary for life. They were the only two material witnesses in the cases against each other.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, December 20, 1898.

 

AT Lexington, Robert Rowland and Martin Johnson, colored, received life sentences for the murder of Jupiter Lewis, a prominent negro citizen.

Released on Bond.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, December 20, 1898.

Lewis, Kristie Renee The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-28-1994
Lewis, L. T. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-20-1928
Lewis, Laban T. Appointed A Marshal

Lexington, Ky. Oct. 3

J. Howard Wilson has been appointed deputy United States Marshal to succeed J. M. Blair, who killed Laban T. Lewis and was himself shot to death by Lewis. Wilson is a prominent republican of Mt. Sterling.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Oct. 10, 1899

Lewis, Lawrence The Winchester Sun   Tues., 5-16-1967
Lewis, Lee                               AA Fatal accident

As Lee Lewis, colored, driving a team for Jack Garner, of this place, attempted to cross the L & N railroad just north of Flanagan, he was struck by the south bound 7 o’clock p.m. train, Friday. The driver and one of the mules attached to the wagon were killed. The other mule was badly bruised and the wagon and load of lumber scattered along the right of way for some distance. The train was running down grade at a rapid rate. The road runs for some distance beside the track, and then turns square across. The driver undoubtedly did not hear the approaching train, as he is said to have turned square across in front of the rapidly moving train.

The Winchester Sun-Sentinel Thursday, August 29, 1907

Lewis, Lee Mar The Winchester Sun   Mon., 1-27-1969
Lewis, Leonard I. Jr. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 11-4-1999
Lewis, Lucien Tuppon The Winchester Sun   Tues., 5-18-1937
Lewis, Luster P. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-20-1948
Lewis, Mariah                     AA Ordered that the Co. Treas. pay John Stubblefield five dollars for making coffin for Mariah Lewis deceased-colored.

Order Book 17, Page 192, April Court 1875

Clark County Courthouse Archives

Lewis, Martha College Hill Items-Died-At the residence of her husband Geo. W. Lewis near this place on Saturday, May 14th, of consumption, Mrs. Martha Lewis, in her 38th year. Her funeral was preached here the Sunday following by the Rev. P. F. Adams, in the presence of a large congregation and many weeping friends, thence the remains were buried in the burying grounds here.

Clark County Democrat     Wed., 6-1-1881

Lewis, Mary Rebecca The Winchester Sun   Wed., 9-7-1994
Lewis, Mike Lee The Winchester Sun   Tues., 11-17, 11-18-1964
Lewis, Millard Griggs The Winchester Sun   Wed., 10-12, 10-13-1955
Lewis, Mrs. Alpheus Mrs. Alpheus Lewis died at her home near Wades Mill Tuesday, aged 78 years. Among her children were Wm. Lewis, Mt. Sterling, Ack Lewis, of Arizona and several daughters.

The Winchester Democrat     Wed., 3-14-1888

 

Margaret Lewis, wife of Alpheus Lewis, died March 15th in San Francisco California, formerly of this county, the former Miss Scott of Bourbon County.

The Semi-Weekly Sun   3-26-1890

Lewis, Mrs. Alta                     AA The Winchester Sun   Tues., 7-31-1928
Lewis, Mrs. Annie E. The Winchester News Mon., 1-15-1912
Lewis, Mrs. Avis S.

Wolfenbarger

The Winchester Sun   Tues., 5-20-1997
Lewis, Mrs. Blanche W. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 5-28-1985
Lewis, Mrs. Cain                   AA THE Court of Appeals has reversed the Bourbon Circuit Court, and gave Cain Lewis a new trial. Lewis, a negro was given a life sentence for killing his wife with a blunt instrument. Evidence produced since the trial shows that the woman died of arsenic poison, and the court holds the prisoner should not have been convicted under an indictment charging an entirely different mode of murder.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, November 2, 1897.

Lewis, Mrs. Clara Miller Death Claims Mrs. Lee Lewis

Mrs. Clara Miller Lewis, 34, wife of Lee Lewis, died at 4 p.m. Tuesday at the Clark County Hospital following a long illness.

Mrs. Lewis was born in Perry County and was a member of the Church of God.

Survivors also include four sons, Charles and Lee Lewis Jr.; three daughters, Miss Pauline Lewis, Miss Laverna Lewis and Miss Wanda Fay Lewis, all of Clark County; two sisters, Mrs. Hargas Noble, Whitesburg; and Mrs. Parlee Young, Robinson, Tenn., and three brothers, Elijah Miller, Whitesburg; James Miller, Perry County, and Henry Miller, Dayton, Ohio.

Funeral arrangements had not been completed.

The body is at the Scobee Funeral Home.

THE WINCHESTER SUN. WED. 7/13/1955

 

The Winchester Sun   Thur., 7-14-1955

Lewis, Mrs. Coma Linville The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-21, 11-22-1966
Lewis, Mrs. Elsie Wilson The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-1-1971
Lewis, Mrs. Esther The Winchester Sun   Fri., 10-28-1955
Lewis, Mrs. Flora Jane The Winchester Sun   Fri., 8-9-1991
Lewis, Mrs. Florence K. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 7-30-1973
Lewis, Mrs. George               AA The Winchester Sun   Sat., 2-18-1933
Lewis, Mrs. Georgina C. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 11-15, 11-17-1952
Lewis, Mrs. Haney Rose The Winchester Sun     Fri., 12-8-1933
Lewis, Mrs. Hattie J. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 8-4-1920
Lewis, Mrs. John The Winchester Sun Tues., 7-22-1913
Lewis, Mrs. Lucy Barkley The Winchester Sun   Tues., 5-19-1942
Lewis, Mrs. Lucy Guess The Winchester Sun   Sat., 1-26-1946
Lewis, Mrs. Madge McKinney The Winchester Sun   Sat., 2-28-1948
Lewis, Mrs. Margaret Scott DIED – Suddenly, March 15, in San Francisco, Cal., Margaret, wife of Alpheus Lewis Sr., formerly of this county. Mrs. Lewis was formerly a Miss Scott, of Bourbon county.

The Democrat Wednesday March 26, 1890

Lewis, Mrs. Marjorie B. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 8-15-2003
Lewis, Mrs. Martha Shock Killed His Mother

Paducah, Ky., April 12

Mrs. Martha Lewis, aged 84 years, is dead of grief over the downfall of her son, Richard Lewis, who while postmaster at Ragland, Ky., forged money orders for $500 and left.   He was sent to the Nashville penitentiary.

The Winchester Democrat Tue., April 16, 1901

Lewis, Mrs. Mary Lee Chenault The Winchester Sun   Thur., 11-2-2006
Lewis, Mrs. Mattie The Winchester Sun Thur., 4-17-1913
Lewis, Mrs. Melvina The Winchester Sun,   Thurs., 3-17-1921
Lewis, Mrs. Mollie McDonald Clark County Republican Fri.   6-30-1916
Lewis, Mrs. Nancy Gabbert The Winchester Sun   Thur., 4-4, 4-5-1963
Lewis, Mrs. Olive Richards The Winchester Sun   Tues., 7-11-1961
Lewis, Mrs. Ollie Baird The Winchester Sun   Wed., 5-4-1955
Lewis, Mrs. Ollie Perry The Winchester Sun Mon., 2-2-1948
Lewis, Mrs. Patsy The Winchester Sun   Mon., 1-23-1978
Lewis, Mrs. Roberta Peters The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-21-1953
Lewis, Mrs. Thelma V. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 1-6, 1-8-1992
Lewis, Mrs. Viola Rolph The Winchester Sun   Wed., 1-20-1999
Lewis, Mrs. Vivian Evans Young The Winchester Sun   Thur., 8-1-2002
Lewis, Mrs. William The Winchester Sun   Wed., 10-30-1918
Lewis, Mrs. Wilma Bush The Winchester Sun   Fri., 5-9-1986
Lewis, Nancy                     AA Died, June 5th, of pneumonia, Nancy, wife of “Uncle” Dick Lewis, aged 65 years.   Funeral services at Union church by Eld. Mitchell, burial at Winchester. “Aunt” Nancy was one of our most highly respected colored women, as was evidenced by a number of our most prominent white people who attended the funeral. The solo, at the conclusion of the service by Elder Mitchell, was pronounced to be one of the most appropriate they ever heard.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, June 8, 1897.

Lewis, Nellie James Lewis & co. vs. Jack Smith & co.

…..J. T. Tucker to distribute to the heirs of William Smith one tenth and to the heirs of Frank Smith one tenth, and to the heirs of Lydia Smith one tenth, and to the heirs of Rebecca Gasper one tenth and to the heirs of Nellie Lewis one tenth and he will hold in his hands subject to the order of the court one tenth each for the following persons who are non residents of this Commonwealth viz: Jack Smith, the unknown heirs of Reuben Smith, the unknown heirs of James Smith, Cynthia Parrish and Mollie Owens….make report.

Order Book 18; P. 519 – 520; May Court 1884

Lewis, Ollie Embery The Winchester Sun   Thur., 7-16-1987
Lewis, Oscar Fingers clutched limb

So tight that they had to be cut open by his rescuer

Harrodsburg, Ky., – Oscar Lewis, a farmer, was drowned, and Miller Burch, his neighbor, had a thrilling experience while going home from this place. The men were in a two horse wagon and attempted to ford Three Lick Creek, which was swollen by an all-day rain. They drove into the water and before they realized it the horses were washed off their feet and the wagon upset. Lewis was caught under the wagon bed, and together with the struggling team, was rushed downstream. They were found by a searching party a half mile below the ford. Lewis and the horse were dead, but the mule had managed to keep his head above water, although nearly dead. He was cut loose from the harness and rescued by Frank Votaw, who swam out in the steam with a knife in his teeth. When the wagon upset, Burch, who did not know how to swim, was swept out on the current, but managed to grab a small limb. The supple limb bent and curved with the weight of his body, and as the raging water rushed by he was plunged up and down in the flood, but though almost fainting, he kept his hold. He called for help with all the breath that was left in him, but it was three hours before aid reached him. Neighbors finally came to the scene and Charles Shelton volunteered to go to the rescue. Burch was almost frozen from being in the water so many hours and his hands were so stiff from his desperate clutch on the limb that his fingers had to be pried open by his rescuer.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, Oct. 9, 1906

Lewis, R. Half A Century Ago

John Martin, executor of R. Lewis, advertises the public sale of sixty-six acres of land near town.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., May 1, 1906

Lewis, Robert Will Book 1, page 142

Dated February 20, 1799 with Alterations Made February 26, 1799 and June 22, 1799

Recorded: July 23, 1799

 

Order the Last Will and Testament to be recorded, 1st codicil proved, 2nd codicil proved, and executors named.

Order Book 1; P. 317; July Court 1799

 

Order for the appraisal of the estate of Robert Lewis decd.

Order Book 1; P. 318; July Court 1799

 

Order the appraisal of estate of Robert Lewis be recorded

Order Book 1; P. 355; November Court 1799

 

An account, John Martin against the estate of Robert Lewis decd. allowed ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 1; P. 372; December Court 1799

 

A report of the sale of the estate of Robert Lewis approved and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 4; P. 518; October Court 1801

 

Ordered that George Taylor, William Lane, Peter Buckner and John Lysle settle and adjust all manner of accounts with the executors of the estate of Robert Lewis and make report to court.

Order Book 4; P. 519; October Court 1801

 

Motion of John Martin one of the executors of the estate of Robert Lewis decd. it is ordered that Sam and Peter formerly the slaves of said Robert Lewis decd. and now present in court is emancipated according to the will of said decd.

Order Book 4; P. 71; December Court 1805

 

Ordered that Hubbard Taylor, James Eubank, John Hinote and Wiley R. Brasfield appointed commissioners to adjust all accounts with the executors of the estate of Robert Lewis decd. and make report to the court.

Order Book 4; P. 120; June Court 1806

 

On the motion of John Martin one of the executors of the estate of Robert Lewis decd. it is ordered that Pleasant and Seala now present in court slaves of the said decedent be Emancipated according to the will of the said decedent and it the opinion of the court that no security is required.

Order Book 4; P. 168; January Court 1807

 

Ordered that the executors of Robert Lewis decd. pay unto Clad a free woman for nursing and supporting a Negro boy Jack belonging to the aforesaid Lewis estate 6 years at seven pounds ten shillings per year as per account.

Order Book 4; P. 389; April Court 1810

 

Ordered that Isaac Hockaday, George G. Taylor, George Taylor and Joshua Nicholas settle and adjust all accounts with the executors of Robert Lewis Decd. and make report.

Order Book 4; P. 390; April Court 1810

 

Settlement with the executors of Robert Lewis decd. ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 4; P. 404; July Court 1810

 

Ordered that James Stonestreet, Joseph Fishback and Colby H. Taylor settle and adjust all accounts with John Martin executor of the estate of Robert Lewis decd. and make report.

Order Book 10; P. 59; December Court 1831

 

Settlement with John Martin executor of Robert Lewis decd. ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 10; P. 101; December Court 1832

Lewis, Robert Burton A Brutal Murder.

Crowds Are After a Negro Who Killed a Little White Boy.

Princeton, Ky., April 22.—A brutal murder occurred at the lime works Monday afternoon. Arthur Jones, colored, shot and instantly killed Bowling Lewis, a white boy.

Lewis caught hold of a truck used in hauling cross ties and Jones ordered him to take his hands off. Lewis laughingly refused, whereupon Jones drew a revolver and fired, the ball taking effect in the right breast, causing instant death. Jones escaped. Sheriff Jones is after him with a posse. It is feared he will be lynched. Lewis lived in Rowland, Nelson county, Kentucky.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, April 25, 1902

 

The Grave Was Opened.

Murdered Man Identified By the Signs His Mother Knew.

Louisville, Ky., May 13.—When Mrs. Sarah H. Lewis, of Louisville, read that Bowling Lewis, killed at Princeton by an unknown Negro, had relatives in Bardstown, she investigated, and had the grave opened. By marks on the body she identified her son, Robert Burton Lewis, and had the grave marked by a suitable slab.

She learned that her son, after he was shot, had been allowed to lie four hours by the side of a railroad track unattended, because, it is said, the railroad people, by whom he was employed, did nothing. The coroner’s verdict stated that with proper attention Lewis would have recovered.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, May 16, 1902

Lewis, Rucker Hogan The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-7, 4-8-1952
Lewis, Samuel Barkley The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-8, 11-9-1965
Lewis, Stephen Will Book 1, Page 199

Dated: March 29, 1869

Recorded: May 31, 1870

Lewis, Stewart The Winchester Sun   Thur., 5-17-1928
Lewis, Sue Elkin The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-24-1921
Lewis, Teddie Frances The Winchester Sun   Tues., 5-31-1966
Lewis, Tevis I. Sr. (Doc) The Winchester Sun   Sat., 11-12, 11-14-2005

Scobee Funeral Home Web Site Fri., 11-11-2005

Lewis, Theodore The Winchester Sun   Wed, 8-29-1917
Lewis, Thomas Motion made by many Gist family members and the heirs and legal representatives of Nathaniel Gist decd. and the legates of Thomas Lewis decd. commission be appointed to take testimony concerning two military surveys of 3000 acres each made under the governors warrant of Virginia by virtue of the King of Great Britain’s proclamation in the year 1763.

Order Book 4; P. 385-386; February Court 1810

 

There is a post and panel fence around the family burying ground on the Lewis farm, about seven miles northeast of Winchester, built about sixty years ago which is made entirely of Kentucky marble. There are one hundred feet of fence, and the panels are five feet long, ten inches wide and five inches thick, and are dove-tailed into the posts, which are about one foot square and three and a half high. The post holes were dug down to solid rock, which forms the foundation for the posts, making the entire fence as solid as if nature had been the architect. It is as sound today as when first put up, and will doubtless stand for centuries if no other power than that of the elements is brought to bear upon its destruction. This is probably the only fence of its kind in the United States, and is a fit example of the thorough manner in which the old Kentucky gentleman always did things.

The Democrat Wednesday June 5, 1889

 

Among the “Prominent old Families of Kentucky” in the Industrial American we find the following sketch of a noted Clark county man. Asa K. Lewis, was educated at Transylvania University, and afterward graduated at Princeton, also graduating in Law there. He was a man of more than ordinary talent and ability with very refined and polished manners, and was very popular. He practiced law for a few years in Mt. Sterling, Ky., and was afterwards Judge of the County Court of Clark County for several years, but finally retired to his farm in that county and could not be induced to hold any political office, contending that he was disgusted with political affairs and professional business. He owned and resided on a large and excellent farm about six miles north of Winchester, in Clark County; being a one-fourth interest in the 3,600 acres purchased by his father, Thomas Lewis, from Gest. He was a Major in the War of 1872 and displayed great bravery in the military service especially at Dudley’s defeat, where he took a very prominent part and gained distinction for courage and skill.

The Democrat, Wednesday, February 15, 1893.

Lewis, Thomas Lexington, Ky., – Dr. Thomas Lewis, 79, for many years a leading physician in Boyle   and Lincoln counties, died in the asylum here as the result of softening of the brain. He was the father of A.A. Lewis, of Covington, and Misses Georgia and Margaret Lewis,     of Stanford.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, January 3, 1910

Lewis, Thomas A. Jr. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 3-17-2001
Lewis, Thomas E. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 10-11-1967
Lewis, Thomas H. Thomas Lewis Dead

Lexington, Ky., Sept. 23

Thomas H. Lewis, aged 29 years, son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Lewis, of Bourbon county, for a number of years bookkeeper at the Second National Bank here and a prominent society man, died at the Good Samaritan hospital from typhoid fever.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Sept. 26, 1902

Lewis, Thomas W. Thomas W. Lewis’s Admin. against Thornton Lewis …….Equity

Master’s settlement with Admin. of T. W. Lewis filed ……..noted.         report of debts filed ……noted.

Order Book 12; P. 5; July Court 1864

 

T. W. Lewis’s Admin. against Thornton Lewis ………Equity

……….submitted to court for Judgment

Order Book 12; P. 9; July Court 1864

 

Thomas W. Lewis’s Admin against Thornton Lewis ….Equity

Assets in the hands of admin. H. Croxton will pay the costs ………continued

Order Book 12; P.29; July Court 1864

 

Thomas W. Lewis’s Admin. vs. Thornton Lewis …………Equity

……………continued

Order Book 12; P. 83; November Court 1864

 

Report filed and noted

Order Book 12; P. 186; July Court 1865

 

Case submitted

Order Book 12; P. 195; July Court 1865

 

Commissioner is ordered to pay costs and allowances …papers filed

Order Book 12; P. 197; July Court 1865

 

Thomas W. Lewis Admin. vs. Thornton Lewis ………………Equity

……..an error in Master’s report ………..ordered that Admin. pay ………..

Order Book 12; P. 315; December Special Term Court 1865

Lewis, Thornton Will Book 1, Page 237

Dated: September 19, 1872

Recorded: November 28, 1872

Lewis, Thornton Thornton Lewis Executor vs. James E. Neil

Commissioner gives deeds to lands from previous judgments, James H. French executor of Thornton Lewis decd.

Order Book 16; P. 599; May Court 1878

Lewis, Thornton Thornton Lewis and wife vs. Wilson Oliver

The death of Thornton Lewis is suggested…defendants Wilson Oliver and J. N. Oliver failing to answer plaintiff recover…

Order Book 14; P. 544; November Court 1872

 

Thornton Lewis vs. Archie Turner

Death of plaintiff is suggested, cause continued.

Order Book 14; P. 544; November Court 1872

 

Thornton Lewis widow & heirs on petition

…..petition filed…..Thornton Lewis will filed…Modification of will ordered to be confirmed…after the death of the testator and his wife Mrs. Emma Lewis, executor shall proceed…parties are dismissed.

Order Book 15; P. 1 – 2; December Court 1872

Lewis, Tom                           AA At the colored picnic in Thomson’s grove on Friday last, a colored boy by the name of Tom Lewis, was accidentally shot and killed instantly. He attempted to run between the shooting stand and the target at the shooting gallery, when the bullet struck him just above the right nipple and penetrated the heart. A colored woman was shooting at the target. Coroner Boone held an inquest Friday night and rendered a verdict of accidental shooting.

The Winchester Democrat     Wed., 7-31-1889

Lewis, Viola Trimble The Winchester Sun   Thur., 8-13-1992
Lewis, W. F. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 6-29-1923
Lewis, W. M.                         AA The Winchester Sun   Sat., 10-25-1919
Lewis, Walter H. Turfman Lewis dies suddenly

Frankfort, Ky., – Walter H. Lewis, aged 63 years, who with his brother, W.J. Lewis owns the noted Belair rock farm near here dropped dead of heart failure, caused by an attack of indigestion.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, February 4, 1908

Lewis, Will Fayette-Will Lewis, aged fifteen years, was accidentally shot through the stomach with a ball from a Winchester rifle, and died shortly afterward.

The Winchester Democrat     Wed., 10-2-1889

Lewis, William Alex The Winchester Sun   Fri., 3-14-1986
Lewis, William F. The Winchester Sun,   Fri., 1-7-1921
Lewis, William Sr. Oldest fisherman

Mr. Wm. Lewis, Sr., of Nashville, Tenn., is here, accompanied by his wife, visiting relatives and friends. Mr. Lewis was born in this county, 73 years ago. His wife is 66 years of age. Her maiden name was Malinda Elkin Tracy, also a native of this county. Thirteen children were born to them, all living: Mrs. Geo. Hart and Mrs. J.A. Griggs, of this city, Mrs. J.A. Myers, of Nashville; the following sons living in Nashville: E.T., Wm., Jr., Thos. D., L.T., Alpheus S. and James P. B.A. lives in Seattle, Wash., J.T. and O.T. in Chicago and Asa. K., in San Francisco. The Nashville Banner has recently published some interesting interviews with Mr. Lewis. Among them is the following: “When I started fishing we didn’t have these jointed Japanese rods you use now, but had what we used to call the ‘East India cane.’ They were fifteen or sixteen feet long and smooth. Then the Meek’s celebrated reel came out and we used them on the long poles. I remember the first reel I ever had. It was made by Snider, of Paris, Ky. I have it still and it’s good for service now. Another one of my fishing possessions of which I am mighty proud is a gaff hook made way back in 1847 by my uncle, Acy Lewis. Then I’ve still got a No.2 Meek reel I’ve had over fifty years and it’s as good as new now. Then I have one modern reel given me by one of my boys.” William Lewis is just full of fishing stories. He remembers every detail of many exciting incidents of his younger days and can relate many marvelous stories. He never “stretches the blanket” any, however, and impresses a hearer before he begins a narrative that he’s going to tell the truth and not wander into fields of fishing license. There’s a good one he tells of a trip on the beautiful Kentucky river.

The Winchester Sun-Sentinel Thursday, October, 10, 1907

Lewis, Willie The Winchester Sun   Thur., 6-27-1957
Lewis, Wilson Judge Wilson Lewis, of Harlan county, was killed Wednesday by his son, Sydney Lewis. Judge Lewis made himself famous while County Judge as leader of the Law and Order faction which carried on a war with the famous Wilson Howard gang a year or so ago. Through his efforts Wils. Jennings was sent to the penitentiary for life. Wills. Howard was driven from the State and order restored in Harlan. His son, who killed him, is 21 years old and has the reputation of being a fighter. He was by his father’s side during all his fights with the Howard gang, but lately he and his father fell out and the Judge had him bound over to keep the peace. This made matters worse and the father and son met in the barn. No one was present, but the son was seen to empty his five shooter into his father’s body; either bullet would have killed him. The son escaped and has not been caught.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, February 25, 1891

 

SIDNEY LEWIS, who murdered his father, ex-County Judge Lewis, in Harlan county, was convicted at Williamsburg Saturday and got a life sentence. Eight members of the mountain Jury were for the death penalty.

The Democrat, June 17, 1891.

Lewis, Xavier Vernon The Winchester Sun   Sat., 3-27-2004
Lewter, Joseph The Winchester Sun   Tues., 11-6-1951
Lexington Courthouse Fire Twice in the last two weeks has the Lexington Courthouse been on fire and under such circumstances as to point without doubt to incendiarism. It is thought by many that the purpose was to burn the county records where Frank Scearce has forged the release to so many mortgage releases. It is thought that more than one prominent man is interested in his work and has profited by his crimes, and the idea in having the Courthouse fired was to destroy the evidences of his guilt. Among the articles destroyed in the last fire was the old gallows which has figured in many sensational events.

The first man executed on it was Isaac Turner, a negro, who shot another negro named Ray on Mrs. Gay’s place near Chilesburg in 1881. The next victim was Dan Timberlake, colored, who killed a negro near Lexington. The next execution was that of John Bush, colored, for the murder of Miss Annie VanMeter. This was probably the hardest fought trial of the kind in the State. Bush was at work for Mr. VanMeter and becoming angry went to his cabin and got his gun and shot Miss VanMeter who was standing in front of the house. The defense was that the shooting was accidental and that even then her death was the result of want of medical attendance and not of the wound. The first trial resulted in a hung jury. The second gave Bush a death sentence. The Court of Appeals reversed this and sent it back. Again he was sentenced to death and this time the Court of Appeals affirmed the decision. It was carried to the Supreme Court of the United States which set aside the decision of both Courts and ordered the prisoner to be discharged. This was done, when Bush was again arrested on a new indictment for the same crime and again convicted, which verdict was sustained by the higher courts and he was finally hung.

The next subject of outraged justice was Tuck Agee, who killed his brother-in-law, Falconer, to obtain possession of a little piece of land in which both were interested. Agee was a white man who lived on Todd’s road between Pine Grove and Lexington.

The execution of Tom O’Brien for the murder of Bettie Shea is of so recent a date that all remember the details.

The old gallows has also played an important part in the “shuffling off the mortal coil” for murders in other places, Sam Bulger, colored, was hung on it at Maysville for rape, his victim being a little school girl, daughter of a prominent farmer. Another negro, from Nicholasville, made his exit from this platform. Pat Hunt, of Paris, was hung on it for the murder of Rick Thomas.

The crowning celebrity of the old instrument of death was the hanging of Neal and Craft at Ashland. The excitement attending this trial is well known and the discomforts of the State Guard, who were called upon to protect them, has given many of the citizens of this section their only taste of the trials of actual warfare.

The Winchester Democrat; Wednesday, November 29, 1893

 

Workman Horribly Mangled.

LEXINGTON, Ky., Nov.   18.—Pat Maloney, a laborer employed in the reconstruction of the courthouse, was horribly mangled by the falling of a heavy stone from one of the derricks Wednesday morning. His injuries are fatal.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, November 23, 1897.

Lexington Lunatic Asylum J.K. Cardwell, of Harrodsburg has been offered and has accepted the Stewardship of the Lexington Lunatic Asylum. This is one of the best places in the gift of the administration.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, January 17, 1896

 

There are 817 patients in the Lexington Lunatic Asylum, 17 of whom are from Clark county.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, December 14, 1897

 

During the month of December 20 patients were admitted at the Eastern Kentucky Asylum at Lexington. There are at present 894 patients at the Asylum.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, January 10, 1899

 

Shake Up At The Feeble Minded Institute.

The Republican administration continues to have trouble in its appointees. Since Dr. Berry was removed on account of his politics the institute has now its third Superintendent. The first appointee was Dr. Huff, the second was Dr. Long, who has just passed out at the Governor’s request and is succeeded by Dr. W. W. Ely, of this   city. The Republicans have been very unfortunate in selecting asylum Superintendents. The only qualified appointment was Dr. McNary and he died very soon after his entrance into office. The other appointees were removed for cause. The charities will ever remember the Republican administration of Kentucky and they wish it at an end.—Kentucky Argus.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, August 29, 1899

 

Shake Up At The Feeble Minded Institute.

The Republican administration continues to have trouble in its appointees. Since Dr. Berry was removed on account of his politics the institute has now its third Superintendent. The first appointee was Dr. Huff, the second was Dr. Long, who has just passed out at the Governor’s request and is succeeded by Dr. W. W. Ely, of this   city. The Republicans have been very unfortunate in selecting asylum Superintendents. The only qualified appointment was Dr. McNary and he died very soon after his entrance into office. The other appointees were removed for cause. The charities will ever remember the Republican administration of Kentucky and they wish it at an end.—Kentucky Argus.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, September 1, 1899

Lexon, Mrs. W.E. Died at Ricmond

Mrs. W.E. Lexon, wife of the well known horseman, of Richmond, and who was well known here, died at her home in that place Thursday.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, September 1, 1908

Lickton, Mrs. Mildred The Winchester Sun   Thur., 6-2-1988
Liddle, Walter P. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 8-24-1928
Lifer, Lucy Died At The Age Of 109

Middlesboro, Ky., April 19

Lucy Lifer, aged 109, died Thursday morning at Dick’s Store, Harlan county of a stroke of paralysis.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., April 23, 1901

Liggett, Christy The Winchester Sun   Wed., 9-14, 9-15-2005

Scobee Funeral Home Web Site Tues., 9-13-2005

Liggett, David Thomas The Winchester Sun   Thur., 11-14, 11-15-1996
Liggett, John E. Died—John E. Liggett, senior member of the great tobacco firm of Liggett & Myers, died Tuesday night at St. Louis, aged 70.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, November 26, 1897

Liggett, John W. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 3-31-1927
Liggett, Mrs. Bessie Gray The Winchester Sun   Wed., 4-11-1984
Liggett, Mrs. Hattie Richards The Winchester Sun   Thur., 7-29-1993
Liggett, Mrs. John The Winchester Sun Tues., 11-13, 11-15-1917
Liggins, Charley The Winchester Sun   Wed., 2-23-1955
Lightfoot, Angelan The Winchester Sun   Tues., 7-23, 7-25, 7-26-2002
Lightfoot, John CAPT. JOHN LIGHTFOOT, a native of Kentucky, and one of the five men who organized the Grand Army of the Republic is dead at Bloomington, Illinois.

The Democrat, Wednesday, October 7, 1891.

Lightfoot, Mrs. James Killed In A Runaway Accident

Bowling Green, Ky., Nov. 1

Mrs. James Lightfoot, aged 40, of this city, was killed in a runaway accident near this city Monday morning. Her little son got cold riding in an open buggy and got out to run behind. He is supposed to have frightened the horse.   Mrs. Lightfoot jumped out and alighted on her feet, but fell again, breaking her neck. She leaves a husband and several children.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Nov. 7, 1899

Lightfoot, Stanley Sauner The Winchester Sun   Fri., 6-19-1998
Lightner, J. R. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-18-1929
Lightner, Mrs. Juliet Epperson The Winchester Sun   Mon., 7-31-1944
Ligufelter, David THE WAR OF 1812 – Private

The Roll of Two Companies Raised in Clark County by Capt. James Sympson.

Company of Mounted Kentucky Volunteers under the Command of Capt. James Sympson. Left Winchester September 15th, 1814, and arrived at Urbana, Ohio on the 20th.

The Semi-Weekly Sun     Fri., 2-21-1879

Likens, Miss________ Miss Likens, who resides near Shawsville, Virginia, met a terrible death recently. She went out to gather berries on the mountainside and not returning in a reasonable time, search was instituted for her. A few miles from her home the searchers ran across a large bear, at whose feet the outlines of a woman could be indistinctly observed. The bear was dispatched and it was then found that the bear’s victim was Miss Liken.   The body was terribly mutilated and every evidence went to show that the unfortunate girl had first been squeezed to death by the bear the then partly devoured.

The Democrat, Wednesday, November 18, 1891

Likens, Mr. _______ Sawmill Explosion At Owenton

Owenton, Ky., April 13

The boiler of the sawmill at Sweet Owen exploded Tuesday, instantly killing _______Likens and severely injuring Jas. Linn. The explosion is thought to be the result of a defect in the boiler, as the pressure was not high. Likens was the engineer.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., April 18, 1899

Lile, Mrs. Iva Mae The Winchester Sun   Sat., 8-15-1998
Lile, Selby T. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 3-4-1987
Lillard, Christopher Distiller Lillard dead

Lawrenceburg, Ky., June 25 – Christopher Lillard, of the big distillery firm of Bond & Lillard, died Wednesday afternoon. He leaves a large estate, a wife and six children.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, June 26, 1896

 

Quarter-Million divided

Distiller C.C. Lillard’s estate shared in by seven heirs

Lawrenceburg, Ky., July 23 – The will of C.C. Lillard, of the firm of Bond & Lillard, the distillers, has been probated. The estate is valued at nearly $250,000. R.H. Lillard and Rev. J.S. Lyons, of the First Presbyterian church, Louisville, are named as executors. His widow is left real estate, bank stock and cash to the amount of about $40,000, while the remainder is to be divided between the six children – R.H. Lillard, W.F. Lillard, Mrs. A.H. Witherspoon, of Lexington; Mrs. D.L. Merriwether, of Frankfort; Mrs. J.S. Lyons and Mrs. George McLeod, of Louisville.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, July 24, 1896

Lillard, E. W. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 2-18-1915
Lillard, Eph The Winchester Sun,   Thurs., 4-7-1921
Lillard, John D. The Winchester Sun Mon., 7-7-1913
Lillard, Mrs. Bertha The Winchester Sun   Thur., 6-23, 6-24-1921
Lillard, Mrs. Hester Dean The Winchester Sun   Sat., 8-1-1931
Lillard, Patricia Ann The Winchester Sun   Thur., 7-19-1984
Lillard, Robert Lamont The Winchester Sun   Mon., 6-24, 6-26-1974
Lillard, T. M. FRANKLIN G. ROBINSON, formerly of this county, but who for many years has lived at Belton, Missouri, recently bought the farm of his deceased father-in-law, T. M. Lillard, of Boyle county, containing 450 acres, at $65 per acre.

The Democrat, Wednesday, November 4, 1891.

Lillard, William The Winchester Sun   Thur., 7-24-1947
Lillard, William The Winchester Sun   Tues., 12-4-2001
Lillard, William The Winchester Sun   Fri., 10-2-2009
Lillard, William Sr. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 10-18-1990
Lilleston, Mrs. Mary The Winchester Sun,   Wed., 2-16-1921
Lilley, son Died, Wednesday October 27th, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Grant Lilley. Burial in the Log Lick cemetery. The bereaved parents have the sympathy of all in their sad bereavement.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, November 5, 1909

Lilliard, Eph The Winchester Sun   Wed., 5-16-1928
Lilly, Craig Died—At Clay City last week, Craig the little son of Judge and Mrs. Jas. W. Lilly. Mr. and Mrs. Lilly have the sympathy of many friends in this city, where they formerly resided.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, August 9, 1893

Lilly, Evans The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-27, 6-7-1918
Lilly, Grant The Winchester Sun   Fri., 3-3-1916

Clark County Republican Fri. 3-11-1916

Lilly, Grant E. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 1-6-1940
Lilly, H. C. Died

Judge H. C. Lilly died at his home in Irvine, Tuesday, April 17th, aged seventy years.   He was formerly Circuit Judge of his district and was a prominent lawyer.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., April 20, 1900

Lilly, Henry The Winchester Sun   Thur., 3-14-1940
Lilly, James E. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 2-7-1928
Lilly, James E. The Winchester   Sun   Wed., 5-24-1933
Lilly, Martin Luther The Winchester Sun   Tues., 12-16-1975
Lilly, Matthew The Winchester Sun   Tues., 9-19-1978
Lilly, Milton Eugene The Winchester Sun   Thur., 4-23, 4-24-1998
Lilly, Mrs. Anna D. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 7-31-1948
Lilly, Mrs. Frances Embry The Winchester Sun Thur., 4-12, 4-13-2007
Lilly, Mrs. James J.             AA Killed His Wife

He Then Ran To The River And Shot Himself-Tragic Death of Mrs. James J. Lilly

Cynthiana, Ky., Oct. 19

James J. Lilly, a well-known and popular colored politician of this city, shot and killed his wife about 9 o’clock Thursday night. The trouble first started when his wife attended a camp meeting held at Berry, this county, about six weeks ago, against his wishes, and on her return home he gave her a severe beating. She left him immediately, and has since been making her home with her mother.

Late Thursday evening Lilly called at his wife’s home and asked to see her. Upon being admitted into her presence he drew a 32-caliber revolver from his pocket and fired, the bullet taking effect in his wife’s head.   Lilly then sat down and reloaded his revolver, after which he started for the river.

Officers were soon on his trail and discovered him on the railroad bridge one mile north of here.   When Lilly saw escape was impossible, he plunged into the river below, falling 25 feet before striking the water.   He swam to shore, and immediately upon reaching the bank drew the same revolver with which he had slain his wife and attempted suicide, shooting himself in the abdomen, seriously, though not fatally, wounding himself. He was carried to town by officers and placed in jail.

The Winchester Democrat Tue., Oct. 23, 1900

Lilly, Mrs. Mary Guerrant The Winchester Sun   Tues., 2-26-1957
Lilly, Mrs. Mollie Log Lick.

Died, at her home Sunday, Oct. 18th. Mrs. Mollie Lilly, aged about 40 years. She was a consistent member of Log Lick Christian church and loved by all who knew her. She leaves a husband and four children to mourn her loss.

Those loving eyes are closed forever.

That gentle heart is still;

But we must all try and Remember

That it was God’s will.

She was a loving mother,

A wife kind and true,

God alone knows how we miss her

No matter what we do.

Our home is sad and dreary

There is a vacant chair

We miss her loving presence,

We miss her everywhere.

But she is with the angels—

At rest forever more,

And we will try and meet her

On the other shore.

The Sun-Sentinel, Thursday, October 19, 1905

Lilly, Will                             AA The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-21, 5-22-1934
Lilly, William Deaths.

Dr. William Lilly, a native of Clark county, died Sunday in Lowell, Ind., of old age, and was buried Tuesday in White Grove graveyard near Lilly’s Ferry, his remains being accompanied to this county by his sons, Jas. W., of Lowell, Ind., and Marion, of Illinois. Dr. Lilly was born January 30th, 1824, served gallantly in the Union army, practiced his profession for a few years only, and spent most of his life as a farmer in Clark, Powell and Estill counties. His wife, nee Sarah White, died in 1878, and since 1884 he has lived with his children in Dakota and Indiana. His children are Jas. W., of Lowell, Ind., F. Marion, Allen and Mrs. C. A. Vogt, of Illinois; Henry of this county and Robert of Dakota. He was the son of James and his wife Lucy, who was a Bybee. William came with the early settlers from Virginia and settled at Lilly’s Ferry.

Editor’s Note. We are in receipt of a very interesting and well written communication from Dr. Lilly’s niece, Miss Kansas Crow, from which the above facts are taken. It is full of information and we regret that it came so late that we cannot use it in full.

The Sun-Sentinel, Thursday, August 31, 1905

Lily, Mrs. Annie The Winchester Sun   Wed., 3-5-1947
Limberger, Mrs.______ Mrs. Limberger died at Louisville this week aged sixty-eight years. Something of the same name is occasionally met with in this city which smells as if it was about the same age.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Jan. 31, 1899

Linchford, Mrs. Carrie Athens

Mrs. Carrie Linchford died at her home resulting from blood poisoning.

Winchester Sentinel   Wed., Dec. 31, 1902

Lincoln, Abraham Abraham Lincoln, aged seventeen years, and the only grandson of Pres. Lincoln, died at London, England, where his father, Robert Lincoln, was minister from this country.

The Democrat, Wednesday, March 12, 1890.

Lincoln, Abraham Abraham Lincoln, aged seventeen years, and the only grandson of Pres. Lincoln, died at London, England, where his father, Robert Lincoln, was minister from this country.

The Democrat, Wednesday, March 12, 1890.

 

While making a professional call at the old stone house near Thatcher’s Mill, in Bourbon county, Mr. Kegley said: “They say that Abe Lincoln was born in this house.” According to   tradition the birth of the ‘rail splitter’ president was a very remarkable event as more than a dozen different houses claim the honor of being his birth place. Before us is a history of “The Early Life of Abraham Lincoln” by Miss Ida M. Tarbell. In this book we find evidence which places beyond a doubt the place and date and legitimacy of Abraham Lincoln’s birth. Rev. Jesse Head, a Methodist minister, certifies that on the 12th day of June 1806, he solemnized the rites of matrimony between Thomas Lincoln and Nancy Hanks. The late Dr. C. C. Graham, of Louisville, born in 1784, and who died in 1885, was a guest at this wedding. The record shows further that Lincoln was born the 12th day of February, 1809, at what was then known as the “Rock Spring Farm.” About three miles south of Hodgenville in Larue county, Ky. The foregoing is perhaps as authentic an any other facts of history.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, July 27, 1900

Lincoln, Mattie                       AA The Winchester Sun   Wed., 3-31-1915
Lind, Mrs. Rose Baber Popham The Winchester Sun   Thur., 5-31-1984
Linden, Lacy B. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-18, 4-19, 4-20, 4-21-1955
Lindle, Richard The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-6-1915
Lindon, George Daniel The Winchester Sun   Wed., 3-29, 3-31-2006
Lindon, J. W. Death Of Judge Lindon

J. W. Lindon died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. A. H. Hargis, near this city, Friday after a lingering illness, and at an advanced age. The remains were carried to Jackson for burial. He had been County Judge of Breathitt county, and even before the civil war was a power in politics in that county. He was an enthusiastic Democrat and his advice was much sought for.   His wife died a couple of months ago.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Nov., 6, 1900

 

Will Probated

The will of Judge J. W. Lindon, who died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. A. H. Hargis, a few days ago, was probated Monday. He had given his daughter, Mrs. Ida B. Gambill, a farm worth $2,500, which he considered her share of the estate; hence the balance of the estate was given to his daughter Mrs. A. H. Hargis. Senator Hargis was named as executor and Harry Crawford, T. J. Engle and A. R. Sphar were appointed appraisers.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Nov. 27, 1900

Lindon, Lacy B. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 12-17, 12-20-1954
Lindsay, J. William Death Of William Lindsay

William Lindsay, a well known citizen of the county, died this week at his home, near the Mouth of Boone’s Creek. The remains were buried in the family graveyard.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Jan. 19,1906

 

County Court Items

Jesse Lindsay and Chas. Lindsay waived their right of ad ministration on the estate of their brother, J. Will Lindsay, and S. W. Pursley was appointed as administrator with J. W. Moore, W. M. Jones and J. G. Pursley appraisers of the estate.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Jan. 26, 1906

Lindsay, Benjamin The Winchester Sun,   Wed., 3-23-1921
Lindsay, Betsy Gordon The Winchester Sun   Mon., 1-12-1953
Lindsay, Chaney The Winchester Sun   Wed., 1-30-1929
Lindsay, Charles Charles Lindsay vs. Benjamin B. Groom

Same vs. Same

Plaintiff suggested death of plaintiff…revive action…Daniel J. Pendleton as executor of Charles Lindsay decd…..action continued.

Order Book 13; P. 555; November Court 1869

 

Charles Lindsay vs. B. B. Groom

Malinda Lindsay administrator of Charles Lindsay excepts to the judgment and prays and appeal to the court of appeals, which is granted.

Order Book 16; P. 384; November Court 1876

 

Charles Lindsay administratrix vs. B. B. Groom

The plaintiff filed the mandate of the Court of Appeals affirming the judgment herein.

Order Book 17; P. 60; May Court 1878

 

Charles Lindsay vs. B. B. Groom

And now comes Mrs. Malinda Lindsay in whose favor as executrix of the aforesaid Charles Lindsay the above named actions were revived after his death and prosecuted the mandate heretofore filed herein May 17, 1878 of the court of appeals affirming the judgment rendered by this court…..

Order Book 17; P. 215; May Court 1879

Lindsay, Chester N. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 4-11-1922
Lindsay, David Broke His Neck

Paducah, Ky., Oct. 19

David Lindsay, of Ragland, this county, fell from a pecan tree and broke his neck. Death was instantaneous.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Oct. 24, 1899

Lindsay, Dewey Picnickers Injured

A Wagonload Of Them Struck By An Extra Freight Train

Paducah, Ky., Aug. 8

A wagonload of ten picnickers was struck by an extra I. C. freight train at the Tennessee street crossing, just within the city limits, Thursday night, and five were injured, two fatally. The driver tried to pass the track, but succeeded in getting only halfway across when struck. Those injured are: Maggie Koerner, aged 17, of Tyler, Ky. fatally injured; Dewey Lindsay, aged 26, of Tyler, fatally injured; James Warnick, aged 18, of Tyler; Altea Hurt, aged 17, of Pearson, Ky. and Jim Johnson, the colored driver.

Winchester Sentinel   Wed., Aug. 13, 1902

Lindsay, G. Lee The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-22-1926
Lindsay, Jacob Age 55, male, he was single, he was a farmer, he lived in Clark County, KY, he was born in Clark County, KY, parents unknown, he died April 13, 1857 of gastronitis in Clark County, KY.

CCKD

Lindsay, James Prominent Minister Expires.

Hopkinsville, Ky., Sept. 2.—Rev. James Lindsay, one of the most prominent Baptist ministers in southern Kentucky, died at his home near Adlegre, aged 98. For three-quarters of a century he has been preaching.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, September 6, 1898

Lindsay, John DIED-At his home in Montgomery county, Thursday night, John Lindsay, aged 91 years. He was the oldest man in the county.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, March 22, 1895.

Lindsay, Joseph Edmund The Winchester Sun   Wed., 10-12, 10-13-1960
Lindsay, Joseph Sanders The Winchester Sun   Wed., 3-12, 3-13-1958
Lindsay, Louis K. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 9-17-1996
Lindsay, Mary Allen The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-7-2003
Lindsay, Mrs. Eleanor Holmes The Winchester Sun   Wed., 2-7-1934
Lindsay, Mrs. Fenton Boxley The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-24, 10-25-1994
Lindsay, Mrs. Jane Gaitskill The Winchester Sun   Sat., 6-18, 6-20-1977
Lindsay, Mrs. Lon The Winchester Sun   Fri., 3-8-1929
Lindsay, Mrs. Malinda Rev. William Rupard will preach Thursday the 14th for the benefit of Mrs. Malinda Lindsay, the aged mother of Mrs. Pendleton at the home of Capt. D. J. Pendleton as has been the custom for many years although Mrs. Lindsay died more than a year ago.

The Semi-Weekly Sun   8-6-1890

Lindsay, Mrs. Mary Died

At her home near the Mouth of Boone Creek, Monday, Mrs. Mary Lindsay, aged 77 years. She was originally Miss Grimes and was the mother of eleven children, ten of whom are living. The funeral was preached at the family residence by Eld. J. W. Harding and the remains were interred in the family burying ground in Fayette county.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., April 27, 1900

Lindsay, Mrs. Mattie Lou In life’s morning

The gentle spirit of Mrs. Joseph S. Lindsay passes into eternal rest – burial this afternoon

That the ways of Divine providence are ever mysterious has again been verified in the taking of Mrs. Mattie Lou Lindsay, wife of Mr. Joseph S. Lindsay, whose sad death occurred at seven o’clock Monday morning. She was stricken just two weeks ago and from the complicated nature of her ailment, it was feared from the beginning her case was hopeless. Medical skill, professional nursing, and constant attention from family and friends were of no avail, and many were the hearts saddened by the announcement of her untimely and particularly sad death as, beside her devoted young husband, she leaves two little babies, the youngest a few weeks old, the other also too young to realize the loss of a mother’s love and devotion, but to them she has left the heritage of a well spent life, and her love for them now comes from her Sainted Spirit above. Mrs. Lindsay was a sweet, gentle lady of a retiring disposition, her whole pleasure being centered in her family circle and church, and of her beautiful Christian life, those who knew and loved her can best testify, and realize the break caused by the relentless hand of death. To her bereaved parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. Harvey Hunt, and to her devoted husband, The Democrat joins a host of friends in sympathy and condolence. The funeral will take place this afternoon at two o’clock from the family residence and the burial will be in the Winchester cemetery with services at the grave by Eld. J.W. Harding and Rev. J.J. Porter. The following will act as pall bearers: Active – Asa Barrow, John F. Davis, Harvey Franklin, Elkin Hunt, A. Gus Hunt, and O.T. Sudduth. Honorary – B.F. Curtis, Rev. Richard French, W.H. Garner, W.M. Harding, Asa Dooley, R.T. Gay, Chas. Hadley and J.T. Lawrence.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, February 2, 1909

 

Mrs. Lou Lindsay, Mrs. Frank Green and son, John Lindsay, and Mr. William Lindsay, of Louisville, attended the funeral of Mrs. Joseph S. Lindsay Tuesday.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, February 5, 1909

Lindsay, Mrs. Nooney Lone Wife’s Suicide.

Hopkinsville, Ky., Dec. 3.—Mrs. Nooney Lindsay, wife of M. M. Lindsay, of this city, suicided at the home of her father, Roscoe Bartlett, near Alligro, Todd county, Friday, by swallowing an overdose of morphine. Domestic trouble is supposed to have caused the act, as her husband had left her and is suing for divorce, claiming that she violated her marriage vows.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, December 6, 1898

Lindsay, Mrs. Rebecca Scott Died—Mrs. Rebecca Scott Lindsay died a few days ago at Lexington, aged sixty-nine years. She was the wife of William Lindsay, who formerly kept the National House in this city, which is now the Rees House. Mrs. Lindsay was a daughter of Wm. Scott, of Montgomery county and her mother was originally Miss Sphar, of this county. Her funeral was preached by Eld. I. J. Spencer.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, December 10, 1897

Lindsay, Mrs. Virginia Thomas The Winchester Sun   Tues., 9-26-1995
Lindsay, Preston Died

At the home of Thos. Hall near Wades Mill Saturday, Preston Lindsay, at an advanced age.   The remains were brought to this city for interment. Services at the grave by Eld. J. M. Rash.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Dec. 25, 1900

Lindsay, Rebekah Died

At Marian, Kansas, August 29th, Rebekah Lindsay, aged thirteen years. She was a daughter of D. S. Lindsay and a great neice of Mrs. D. J. Pendleton.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Sept. 7, 1900

Lindsay, Thomas C. Age 5, male, he was born in Clark County, KY, his parents were William A. and Rebeca Lindsay, he died in Clark County, KY, March 1, 1858 of typhoid fever.

CCKD

Lindsay, William Life’s tide ebbing

Condition of former Senator Lindsay extremely critical

Frankfort, Ky., – Former United States Senator William Lindsay is at the point of       death as the result of a winking spell which he has sustained. He has been suffering     with bladder trouble for the past two months and has not made the successful resistance to the malady that his physician could wish. Dr. H.S. Keller said that Senator Lindsay’s condition is very critical and his death is liable to occur at any time. Senator Lindsay is 74 years of age.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, October 12, 1909

 

U.S. Senator Lindsay dead

Sank into the dark valley with wife and children around his bedside

Frankfort, Ky., – Former United States Senator Wm. Lindsay, is dead at the age of 75, at his home in this city. He was recognized as one of Kentucky’s greatest statesmen and jurists. There were gathered at his bedside of this great statesman his wife, Mrs. Eleanor Holmes Lindsay, his only daughter, Mrs. Marion Suier, of Cincinnati, his brothers, Charles Lindsay and Bruce Lindsay, the former of Virginia, the latter of Clinton, Ky. Senator Lindsay was afflicted with prostatis and cystitis, with which he had been suffering for two years.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, October 19, 1909

Lindsay, William A. Death of Wm. A. Lindsay

William A. Lindsay, Sr., died at his home in Lexington, Sunday afternoon, after a long illness, aged 71 years. He was born in this county in 1827, and grew to manhood here. He married Miss Rebecca Scott, of this county who, with their children survive him. The children are Dan Scott Lindsay, of Marion, Kansas, W.V. Lindsay, of Lexington and Mrs. Nannie Payne, of that city. Two sisters also survive, Mrs. D.J. Pendleton, of this city, and Mrs. Will Scott, of Lexington. Before the war he was proprietor of what is not the Rees House; and planted the first of the many beautiful maple trees which adorn our streets. He afterward moved to Lexington and was proprietor of the Broadway Hotel. He was also an Internal Revenue official under Fol. A.M. Swope.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, March 24, 1896

Lindsay, William B. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 9-24-1955
Lindsay, William B. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-12, 12-14-2005
Lindsey, Bud JOSEPH MURDOCK, of Scott county, Va., who was supposed to have been murdered by Bud Lindsey, has returned home after an absence of twenty-five years. Lindsey, who died recently in the penitentiary, having been convicted of the alleged murder.

The Winchester Democrat.   Tuesday, March 2, 1897.

Lindsey, Charles Charles Lindsey vs. B. B. Grooms

Revive cases in Mrs. Malinda Lindsey name being executor of Charles Lindsey decd.

Order Book 14; P. 7; May Court 1870

Lindsey, George The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-26, 8-28-1963
Lindsey, James Arthur The Winchester Sun   Wed., 2-23, 2-25, 2-26-2005
Lindsey, Joe Deaths

Judge Joe Lindsey died Sunday at his home in Owen county. He was one of the most popular men in that section of the State. He was the father of Joe S. Lindsey of this county.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., April 28, 1903

Lindsey, Joe The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-28-1924
Lindsey, John Sidney The Winchester Sun   Thur., 7-31, 8-1-1924
Lindsey, L. C. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-6, 12-7-1982
Lindsey, Mrs. Ethel Holbrook The Winchester Sun   Tues., 3-12, 3-13-1968
Lindsey, Mrs. Gladys Snowden The Winchester Sun   Tues., 1-2-1979

Lindsey, Mrs. Malinda

Died, May 19th at the home of her son-in-law, Wm. Scott of Lexington, Mrs. Malinda Lindsey, aged 86 years. Several years ago she fell and broke her hip from which she never recovered. A second fall recently, doubtless hastened her death. She was a native of this county and had a large circle of relatives, her maiden name being Elkin. Three children survive her, Mrs. D. J. Pendleton, of this city and Wm. Lindsey and Mrs. Wm. Scott of Fayette county. Her brother, Zeke Elkin, Sr., is the only survivor of a large family of brothers and sisters. She was a good Christian woman and for sixty-one years had been a member of the Baptist church at Goshen, this county. The funeral was preached by Rev. J. Shouse. The pall-bearers were her three grandsons, F. P. Pendleton, Charles Scott, Wm. Lindsey, Jr., and three nephews, Edward Halley, Henry Halley and John Payne.

The Democrat   Wednesday May 22, 1889

 

Rev. Wm. Rupard will preach at the residence of Capt. D. J. Pendleton on South Main street, Wednesday, August 14th at 3 o’clock, P. M. For many years Bro. Rupard has preached one sermon each year at Capt. Pendleton’s. Mrs. Lindsay, the mother of Mrs. Pendleton, was a member of Goshen church of which Mr. Rupard has been pastor for a long time. While her strength permitted she attended the meetings of her church, but after she became too feeble she visited her daughter each summer, and the meeting was held that she might hear her pastor. Since her death, Mrs. Pendleton has continued the custom in memory of her mother.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, August 9, 1895

Lindsey, Mrs. Mildred A. The Winchester Sun Wed., 1-9, 1-10-1991
Lindsey, Mrs. Mildred C. Wilson The Winchester Sun   Tues., 8-10, 8-11-1999
Lindsey, Samuel L. Killed His Brother-in-Law.

St. Louis, June 23.—Samuel L. Lindsey, a book-keeper, was shot and killed Tuesday evening by his brother-in-law, Herbert G. Everingham. The latter’s little daughter Tuesday confessed to her mother that Lindsey had assaulted her and the father took summary vengeance.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, June 24, 1898

Linebaugh, Mrs. Ethel Carr The Winchester Sun   Sat., 12-16, 12-18-1967
Lingar, Harry The Winchester Sun   Tues., 3-27-1917
Lingard, Mrs. Pauline The Winchester Sun   Fri., 7-10-1987
Lingard, Ralph Sr. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-5-1983
Lingenfelter, George Ordered that George Sutherland be appointed guardian of the estate of Hester Lingenfelter infant orphan of George Lingenfelter dec. giving security whereupon he together with John S. Williams …………….bond in penalty of $500 ……

Order Book 12; P. 395; July Court 1851

 

George Sutherland guardian of Hester Lingenfelter came into court and reported no estate in his hands as such guardian.

Order Book 12; P. 497; October Court 1852

 

Court of Ky. Vs. George Sutherland as guardian of Hester Lingenfelter

The defendant having reported no estate in his hands as such guardian, the summons which issued herein against him is dismissed.

Order Book 12; P. 501; October Court 1852

Lingenfelter, Mrs. Alecia Dozier The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-10-2000
Lingenfelter, Valentine Jr. On motion of Valentine Lingenfelter who made oath thereto as the law directs certificate is granted him for obtaining letters of administration on the estate of Valentine Lingenfelter Jr., dec. in due form giving security whereupon he together with Rolly Sutherland entered into and acknowledged their bond in the penalty of $4000 conditioned as the law directs.

Order Book 11; P. 254; February Court 1844

 

Ordered that F. B. Moss, A. H. Buckner, John Williams and John B. Lampton or any three of them being first sworn do appraise in current money the slaves if any and personal estate of Val Lingenfelter Jr. dec. and make report thereof to the court.

Order Book 11; P. 254; February Court 1844

 

Inventory and appraisement of the estate of Valentine Lingenfelter dec. was produced in court approved of and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 11; P. 262; April Court 1844

 

Amount of sales of the estate of Valentine Lingenfelter Jr. dec. was produced in court approved of and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 11; P. 262; April Court 1844

Lingle, Alfred (Jake) The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-4-1930
Lingle, Alfred (Jake) The Winchester Sun     Wed., 11-15-1933
Lingner, Mrs. Bessie J. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 12-29-1989
Lingren, Richard P. Jr. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 10-7, 10-9-1978
Lininger, Mrs. Connie S. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 10-9-1999
Link, Charley A Lockjaw Victim

At Franklin, Charley Link jumped from the lowest limb of a pear tree to the ground. The stub of a sprout struck in the foot. Lockjaw set in and he died.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., July 31, 1903

Link, Mrs. Alice Hoffman The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-1, 9-4, 9-5-1924
Link, Robert The Winchester Sun   Fri., 3-18-1932
Linkenfelter, Green ISAAC SHELBY JR., a great-grandson of Kentucky’s first and greatest governor, shot and killed Green Linkenfelter at Junction City on Christmas night. It seems that both parties were drunk and in a barroom altercation. Shelby shot Linkenfelter twice in the head killing him instantly.

The Democrat, Wednesday, January 1, 1890

Linkenfelter, William Carl (Link) The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-2-1989
Linley, Mrs. Rosa Rupard The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-18-1952
Linn, Clarence The Winchester Sun   Tues., 1-17-1933
Linn, Henry A. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-3, 11-4-1997
Linneman, Ben J. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 6-26, 6-27-1972
Linneman, Harry F. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 5-8-1935
Linneman, Mrs. Elva Harmon The Winchester Sun   Sat., 2-19, 2-21-1983
Linney, George A Strange Coincidence

Neighbors Fell Dead At The Same Hour On Their Kentucky Farms

Burgin, Ky., Dec. 16

George Linney, aged 90, one of the oldest farmers in the county, fell dead at his home, near McAfee.   He fell in the arms of his wife, uttering no word. He was in robust health a few minutes previous.

Joseph Yeast died about the same time. He lived near Linney, and, seized with epileptic fit, plunged forward into the fire, his head being almost burned from his shoulders ere any of the family arrived on the scene.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Dec. 19, 1902

Linns, daughters IN the U.S. Court at Covington, Chas Linns, whose two daughters were killed by a C . & O. train at Concord, Lewis county, in November, 1895, got a verdict for $2,000 damages against the C. & O.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, December 27, 1898.

Lins, Mrs. Myrtle Aldridge The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-17-1975
Linss, Lulu Last November at Concord, Lewis county, Alvin Pollock and Misses Lulu and Marie Linss who were in a buggy, were run over and killed by the cars. Suits for $25,000 damages in each case have been filed against the C. & O. and the Maysville and Big Sandy Companies.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, January 15, 1897

Linss, Marie Last November at Concord, Lewis county, Alvin Pollock and Misses Lulu and Marie Linss who were in a buggy, were run over and killed by the cars. Suits for $25,000 damages in each case have been filed against the C. & O. and the Maysville and Big Sandy Companies.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, January 15, 1897

Linton, Arthur M. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 5-4-1962
Linton, Dave                         AA The Winchester Sun     Mon., 12-4-1933
Linton, Dossie Jean The Winchester Sun   Fri., 10-12-1934
Linton, Lawrence The Winchester Sun   Fri., 9-11-1959
Linton, Lonzo R. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-24, 2-25-1969
Linton, Walter Guinn Jr. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 11-4, 11-5-1965
Linton, Walter Gwin Sr. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-22, 5-23-1967
Linville, D. R. Deaths

D. R. Linville died at his home in Robertson county last week after a lingering illness, age seventy-three years. Some years ago he was a resident of Clark county.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Oct. 30, 1903

Linville, Guy The Winchester Sun   Fri., 3-31-1916
Linville, Harrison Jr. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 5-29-1979
Linville, infant Hedges

The infant of Louis Linville was buried at Bethlehem March 14th.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., March 23, 1900

Linville, J. H. The Winchester Sun Sat., 5-10-1913
Linville, James T. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 7-7-1978
Linville, James William The Winchester Sun   Tues., 8-13-1957
Linville, Jess The Winchester Sun   Sat., 2-20-1954
Linville, Josh The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-14, 3-15-1960
Linville, Leslie Jacob The Winchester Sun   Thur., 2-12, 2-13-1948
Linville, Leslie McEwan (Mack) The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-17-2000
Linville, Leslie Michele The Winchester Sun   Thur., 1-29, 1-30-1970
Linville, Lewis The Winchester Sun   Fr., 6-16-1939
Linville, Morgan On the motion of Patton D. Harrison certificate is granted him for obtaining letters of administration on the estate of Morgan Linville decd. together with Gova Linville security.

Order Book 10; P. 5; October Court 1830

 

Order for the appraisal of the slaves if any and personal estate of Morgan Linville decd.

Order Book 10; P. 5; October Court 1830

 

Report of the division among the heirs of Morgan Linville decd. of the Negroes of said decedent returned, approved, ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 10; P. 21; January Court 1831

 

Inventory and appraisal of the estate of Morgan Linville decd. ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 10; P. 46; October Court 1831

 

Amount of sales of the estate of Morgan Linville decd. ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 10; P. 46; October Court 1831

 

Ordered that George Fry Jr. be appointed commissioner to settle and adjust all accounts with P. D. Harrison administrator of the estate of Morgan Linville decd. and make report.

Order Book 10; P. 63; January Court 1832

 

Motion of Gova Linville one of the heirs of Morgan Linville decd. ordered that Thomas Wornall, James Dawson, Patton D. Harrison, and William Armstrong be appointed commissioners to divide the lands of Morgan Linville decd. among the heirs of said decedent and make report.

Order Book 10; P. 72; April Court 1832

 

Settlement with P. D. Harrison administrator of the estate of Morgan Linville decd. ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 10; P. 74; May Court 1832

Linville, Mrs. Anna Mary

Henderson

The Winchester Sun   Sat., 4-16-2005
Linville, Mrs. Catherine Clay

McEwan

The Winchester Sun   Mon., 6-18-1973
Linville, Mrs. Clara Parrish The Winchester Sun   Mon., 6-17-1974
Linville, Mrs. Cora Lee The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-29-1986
Linville, Mrs. Elizabeth The Winchester Sun   Mon., 6-22-1942
Linville, Mrs. Florence Doty The Winchester Sun   Sat., 6-12-1976
Linville, Mrs. Katherine Taylor The Winchester Sun   Thur., 7-31, 8-1-1958
Linville, Mrs. Katie Weaver The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-18-1972
Linville, Mrs. Mollie The Winchester Sun   Fri., 3-31, 10-10-1916
Linville, Mrs. Nora M. The Winchester Sun Thur., 2-15, 2-16, 2-17-2007
Linville, Mrs. Sallie E. Indian Fields – Died, July 23d, of heart disease, Mrs. Sallie E. Linville, aged thirty-eight years.   The funeral took place on the following day at the Bethlehem Church by Rev. B. F. Crosby, after which the remains were laid to rest in the Church yard near by. She was a consistent member of the M. E. Church, South.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday July 27, 1897

 

Died – Friday, of Bright’s disease, Mrs. Thos. Linville, aged thirty-eight years. The funeral was preached by Rev. Cosby, pastor of El Bethel church and the remains were interred at El Bethel church. She leaves a husband, two daughters and one son, almost grown, and a little babe but a few weeks old.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday July 27, 1897

Linville, Mrs. Sarah The Winchester Sun   Fri., 8-11-1916
Linville, Mrs. Susan Noel The Winchester Sun   Fri., 12-30, 12-31-2011
Linville, Nathan Bayless The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-19, 10-20-1959
Linville, Oliver Jr. The Winchester Sun Thur., 2-13-1913
Linville, Orville Franklin The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-17-1953
Linville, Orville O’Dell The Winchester Sun   Tues., 2-10, 2-11-1987
Linville, Perry The Winchester Sun   Fri., 8-6-1915
Linville, Samuel R. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 6-13-1931
Linville, Thos. Died—Thos. Linville, died at his home near Pilot View Friday, aged forty-two years. The remains were buried at Bethlehem, funeral services being held by Rev. D. P. Ware. He leaves a family of children; his wife died about a year ago.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, October 25, 1898

Linville, W. T. County Court Items.

Joe Jones appointed administrator of W. T. Linville, with Jas. Haggard, Jno. H. Thomson and Richard Fox appraisers.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, October 25, 1898

Linville, William John Bringar together with John Peebles his security appointed administrator of the estate of William Linville decd.

Order Book 1; P. 329; August Court 1799

 

Order for the appraisal of the estate of William Linville decd.

Order Book 1; P. 330; August Court 1799

 

Order for the appraisal of the estate of William Linville is recorded.

Order Book 1; P. 355; November Court 1799

Linville, William Brown The Winchester Sun   Thur., 3-10-1938
Linville, William Everett The Winchester Sun   Wed., 3-22, 3-24-2006
Lipacomb, Nathan (Nath) The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-22-2002
Lipara, Peter The Winchester Sun   Tues., 10-28-1930
Lipps, Bropha The Winchester Sun   Mon., 1-9, 1-12, 4-12-1933
Lipps, D. M. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 2-7-1928
Lipps, J. E. The Winchester Sun Mon.., 2-1-1943
Lipps, Mrs. Frances Featherston The Winchester Sun Fri., 1-5, 1-6-2007
Lipps, Mrs. Nanly Anna The Winchester Sun   Fri., 6-23-1922
Lipscomb, Arnold The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-28-1921
Lipscomb, Ben E. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 10-22-1988
Lipscomb, daughter The Winchester Sun   Tues., 12-15-1914
Lipscomb, David Munday The Winchester Sun   Wed., 3-9, 3-10-1955
Lipscomb, F. J. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 12-27, 12-29-1919
Lipscomb, Flade Died

Flade, the infant son of Mr. F. J. Lipscomb, died in this city Sunday of cholera infantum.   Burial in Clark county Monday-Richmond Climax.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Sept. 1, 1899

Lipscomb, infant Death of an infant

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. F.J. Lipscomb, of Richmond, but recently of this city, died Sunday, aged eleven months.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, July 20, 1909

Lipscomb, James Death Of James Lipscomb

Jas. Lipscomb, who lives near Mt. Olive Church, died quite suddenly Thursday night. He had worked all the day previous and at night was attacked by neuralgia of the heart and lived but a short time. He was about forty-two years of age and leaves a wife, formerly Miss Ellen Eubank, and three children, ranging in age from six months to five years. The remains were buried in the family graveyard.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Jan. 8, 1901

Lipscomb, Mary The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-2, 11-5-1923
Lipscomb, Matt B. Friday, October 5th, Matt B., the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. F.J. Lipscomb, of this city. The remains were taken to Richmond Sunday for burial.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, Oct. 9, 1906

Lipscomb, Mrs. Alice Warner The Winchester Sun   Fri., 10-26-1984
Lipscomb, Mrs. Frankie Death of Mrs. Lipscomb.

Mrs. Frankie Lipscomb died suddenly at her home near Hunt Saturday evening. She had just returned from a visit to her daughter, Mrs. Henry Jones, at Pinchum, and as she stepped from her buggy, she fell and expired, evidently from heart disease. She was nearly eighty years old, and before her marriage was Miss Haggard, daughter of David Haggard. Her husband Squire Nathan Lipscomb, died several years ago.

She leaves four children, David Lipscomb, of Lee’s Summit, Mo., Flavius of Clay City; Allie, of Hunt and Mrs. Chas. P. Haggard, of Athens. The funeral was preached at Mt. Olive church of which she had long been a member, by Rev. Otis Hughson and the remains were buried in the family graveyard. She was a woman of great strength of mind and had many friends.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, May 20, 1902

Lipscomb, Mrs. Geneva Bush The Winchester Sun   Sat., 2-29-1992
Lipscomb, Mrs. Mary Death Of Mrs. Lipscomb.

In our last issue we noted the birth of twin boys to the wife of Flade Lipscomb, of Richmond, but who had lived in this county until recent years. The Register thus gives the sequel: “A pathetically sad death was that of Mrs. Mary Lipscomb. Wife of Mr. F. J. Lipscomb Saturday night leaving two little twin boys but three days old and a devoted husband to mourn her untimely death. Deceased, who was twenty-two years old, was before her marriage Miss Mary Roark, of Valley view, where her parents still reside. After funeral services at the house on Laurel streets, the remains were taken to Clark county Sunday for burial. Mrs. Lipscomb’s mother has charge of the twins, who were named Flavius and Josephus by their dying mother.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, September 9, 1898

Lipscomb, Mrs. Nannie Munday The Winchester Sun   Tues., 11-13-1928
Lipscomb, Mrs. Norma Ella

Thomas

The Winchester Sun   Fri., 9-24, 9-25-2004
Lipscomb, Mrs. Opal D. The Winchester Sun Tues., 9-11, 9-12, 9-13-2007
Lipscomb, Mrs. Sarah Lewis Died in Arkansas.

Near Helena, Arkansas last Monday, Mrs. Sarah Lipscomb died, aged about seventy years. She was a native of this county, a daughter of the late Asa Lewis. Her husband, Josiah Lipscomb, was from Madison county and was a brother of the late Squire Nathan Lipscomb, of this county. She was a most estimable woman and highly regarded to all who knew her.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, December 27, 1898.

Lipscomb, Mrs. Willie Mae The Winchester Sun   Mon., 1-27-1992
Lipscomb, Nathan Thursday night at his home near Mt. Olive Church, Nathan Lipscomb, aged about 77 years. Burial at the old Haggard graveyard, with funeral services by Rev. Richard French, of the Baptist Church, of which he had long been a member. He was one of the most hospitable men in the country, and for many years, until weighed down by sickness and the infirmities of age, was a magistrate for Pinchem precinct. His wife, Miss Haggard, to whom he was married more than half a century ago, and a number of children survive him. During the half century of his married life, this is the first death that has occurred in the family.

The Democrat, Wednesday, November 2, 1892.

 

Mrs. Frances Lipscomb is erecting a monument over the grave of Nathan Lipscomb,

her deceased husband.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, January 17, 1896

 

Died in Arkansas.

Near Helena, Arkansas last Monday, Mrs. Sarah Lipscomb died, aged about seventy years. She was a native of this county, a daughter of the late Asa Lewis. Her husband, Josiah Lipscomb, was from Madison county and was a brother of the late Squire Nathan Lipscomb, of this county. She was a most estimable woman and highly regarded to all who knew her.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, December 27, 1898.

Lipscomb, Nathan The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-9, 8-10-1976
Lipscomb, R. E. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-7-1930
Lipscomb, S. A. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 8-29, 8-30-1917
Lipscomb, William S. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 4-20, 4-21-1956
Lipscombe, Mrs. Allie The Winchester Sun   Thur., 3-16, 3-25-1916
Lisafeld, Mrs. Sarah Margaret The Winchester Sun   Tues., 10-20, 10-22-1992
Lischey, Horace The Winchester Sun Wed., 5-7-1913
Lisle, J. Clark J. Clark Lisle’s Admin. vs. J. C. Lisle’s Heirs ……….Equity

The plaintiff amended petition ……….filed ………noted.

Order Book 12; P. 450; November Court 1866

 

J. C. Lisle’s Admin. vs. J. c. Lisle’s Heirs &c ………..Equity

On motion of plaintiff the deft. Ibzan Lisle is warned to appear and filled his answer ………….The defendants James D. Lisle, John B. Lisle and Claiborne Lisle filled separate answers.

Order Book 12; P. 492; November Court 1866

 

J. C. Lisle’s Admin. vs. J. C. Lisle & Heirs &c ………Equity

…………..report the claims against the estate of J. Clark Lisle dec. The administrator of James Lisle dec. filed two receipts.

Order Book 12; P. 555; May Court 1867

Lisle, Aaron                           AA Aaron Lisle, colored, leaves his home of about six acres near Ford, to his son, Frank Lisle.

The Democrat, Wednesday, December 30, 1891.

Lisle, Andrew Jackson A. J. LISLE IS CALLED TO REST

Life Ends Thursday Afternoon for resident of Pilot View Neighborhood A. J. Lisle, 73, years old, died Thursday afternoon at 2:40 o’clock at his home near Pilot View, Clark County. He is survived by three daughters, Mrs. Charles Quisenberry and Mrs. Fred Farris, Winchester, and Mrs. Carlisle Watson, Louisville; a son, Jimmy Lisle, Pilot View; two brothers, J. R. Lisle, Winchester, and Manson Lisle, Lexington, and a sister Mrs. Nannie Patton, Dallas, Texas. The remains will be removed to the home of Mrs. Quisenberry, East Lexington Avenue this afternoon. Funeral arrangements have not been completed.

THE WINCHESTER SUN, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 1931

 

FUNERAL SUNDAY FOR A. J. LISLE

Services for Resident of County Will be Held at Home of Daughter at 3 P.M.

Funeral services for A. J. Lisle, 73, who died Thursday at his home near Pilot View will be held Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock at the home of his daughter, Mrs. C. C. Quisenberry, East Lexington Avenue, by Rev. C. M. Neal, pastor of the Main Street Christian Church.

Active pallbearers will be: V. D. Quisenberry, Lisle Quisenberry, Andrew Farris, Steve Farris, James Watson, and Henry Brown. Honorary— J. H. Thomas, J. T. Bush, Chris M. Brown, Wallace Hukle, Allan Watts and Dr. J. O. Piersall.

Mr. Lisle is survived by three daughters, Mrs. Charles Quisenberry and Mrs. Fred Farris, Winchester, and Mrs. Carlisle Watson, Louisville; a son, Jimmy Lisle, Pilot View; two brothers, J. R. Lisle, Winchester, and Manson Lisle, Lexington, and a sister, Mrs. Nannie Patton, Dallas Texas.

THE WINCHESTER SUN FRIDAY, JULY 31, 1931

Lisle, Annie Buckner DEATHS   Monday afternoon, on South Maple street, of meningitis, Annie Buckner, the three months old daughter of Judge and Mrs. M. C. Lisle.

The Democrat, Wednesday, December 9, 1891.

Lisle, Ben                             AA Circuit Court

Dick Wilson, colored, was tried for stealing tobacco from Col. Al. Duckworth, but the case was not a very strong one and Dick was set free. If he did steal from Col. Duckworth it was the basest ingratitude, for many years ago when Dick had killed Ben Lisle another negro, it was chiefly through Col. Duckworth’s influence that he escaped hanging.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, September 27, 1895

Lisle, Ben Gilbert (Gibby) The Winchester Sun   Wed., 9-10, 9-11-2003
Lisle, Braxton The Winchester Sun   Tues., 5-27-1913
Lisle, brothers The Sun Sentinel Thur., 2-9-1911
Lisle, C. A. (Connie) The Winchester Sun   Sat., 11-22-1952
Lisle, Callie The Winchester Sun   Tue., 7-15-1975
Lisle, Carey The Winchester Sun   Fri., 3-21, 3-27-1930
Lisle, Catherine Died—Saturday night of stomach trouble, Catherine, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D. C. Lisle, aged three months and twenty days.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, October 4, 1893

Lisle, Charles C. The Winchester Sun Tues., 6-5, 6-6, 6-9-1951
Lisle, Chilton Allen DEATHS   At his home in Chattanooga, Tenn., July 9th, after a lingering illness Mr. Chilton Lisle. He was a son of Henry Lisle and formerly lived in Madison county between Ford and Boonesboro. He leaves a widow and two children. The former was a Miss Bush of this county, and a sister of Mrs. J. W. Poynter of this city.

The Democrat, Wednesday, July 22, 1891.

Lisle, Claiborne We have received a statement of the Newberry (S. C.) National Bank in which Claiborne Lisle, of this city, is a large stockholder, and which is one of the best paying institutions in the South. With a capital stock of $130,000 and surplus fund and undivided profits of nearly $100,000 it has loans and discounts of over $450,000 and a very large line of deposits. There is also a flourishing cotton mill and oil mills in the city.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, August 9, 1893

 

The Newberry Bank of South Carolina, in which Claiborne Lisle owns considerable stock, shows great prosperity in its recent statement. It has a very large line of deposits and nearly half a million of loans.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, October 18, 1893

 

Wednesday the Court of Appeals decided the case of Couchman vs. Lisle etc., from this county. This is an offshoot of the famous Lisle will case. J. A. Couchman and others of the successful devises, sued Claiborne Lisle and Joe Carroll upon the supersedeas bond for the costs of the suit amounting to over two thousand dollars. In the Circuit Court it was decided that Messers. Lisle and Carroll could not be held for the costs. The Court of Appeals confirmed this decision.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, January 17, 1894

 

Died – Robert L. McLaughlin, of Newberry, South Carolina, died last week. He was President of the Newberry National Bank, and one of the best financiers of the South. His death leaves Clayborne Lisle, of this city, the largest living stockholder in that institution. In addition to paying the usual annual dividend, this bank has a surplus of $100,000, and a few years ago declared a dividend of fifty percent.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, February 7, 1896

 

Bank Stock Sold.

Claiborne Lisle sold last week to Carlisle Bros., of Newbury, S. C. 150 shares of bank stock in the Commercial Bank of Newbury S. C. at $150 per share, aggregating $22,000. Mr. Lisle bought the stock nearly twenty years ago, and has drawn out more than two hundred per cent in dividends, besides selling out at a handsome profit on the original cost.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, December 6, 1901.

 

Death of Claiborne Lisle

A prominent citizen and well known farmer passes away – Sketch of his life

The death of Claiborne Lisle, which occurred Monday was not unexpected and was the culmination of a long and busy life. But little seemed to be the matter and his death was simply the sunset of old age. Nearly ninety years ago he was born in the Southern part   of the county and had lived all his life in the same neighborhood. He was a fine business man and in his vocation as a farmer he made money. By judicious investments he increased his holdings and at his death, or at least before he had deeded his real estate to his children, he was quite a rich man. He was affable and easily approached and few men had done more to help those who needed financial backing or financial assistance than he. His wife, who was Miss Hampton before her marriage died many years ago. Two daughters, Mrs. T. Jeff Eubanks, and Mrs. James Duckworth and one son, Hon. Marcus Lisle, preceded him to the grave. Three sons, James. D., Connie and Thomas, and two daughters, Mrs. Pora Oliver and Mrs. Jesse Hodgkin, survive him. The remains were buried Wednesday morning in the Winchester cemetery with services at the grave by Rev. Richard French and Elder James W. Harding. The pall bearers were Sam Hodgkin, Jr., Charles Lisle, Ben K. Duckworth, Harry Lisle, M.W. Lisle and Ernest Lisle. The honorary pall bearers were: N.H. Witherspoon, J.W. Hunt, Dr. J.W. Johnson, A. Hood Hampton, J.F. Winn, J.A. Bybee, J.M. Stevenson, and J.H. Croxton. He was a strong man of strong convictions and could easily have made himself a leader of men. However, he did not aspire to public position. At the time of his death he was Vice President of the Winchester bank. He was a good citizen and his death will be greatly regretted. At a meeting of the Directors of The Winchester Bank the following resolutions were passed:

ACTION TAKEN BY BANK:

The Board of Directors of the bank desire to express profound sorrow at the death of Claiborne Lisle, which occurred on Tuesday, January 18, 1910, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Jesse N. Hodgkin, near Elkin, Clark county, Ky., in the 90th year of his age. Mr. Lisle was one of the original incorporators of this bank and from that time has been constantly one of its most valued and efficient officers, and at the time of his death was its Vice President. To his faithful and intelligent care and oversight must be attributed in a large measure the success and high position which this institution has attained. He was a man of unusual business capacity, spotless integrity and strong personality, which made him a tower of strength to the entire community as well as the association with which he was connected for so many years. His influence for good in the community was unceasing, and will continue in many channels long after his removal from us. As a citizen he was an exemplary man, a man of uncompromising integrity, of high morals, clean in every transaction of his life, prudent in business, faithful to every trust, and was as true as steel to his friends. He has passed from our midst to enter upon the larger activities for which his life was a fitting preparation. It is ordered that this minute be spread upon the records of the bank, and that a copy of the same be sent to his family and furnished to the press for publication. Attest: W.R. Sphar, Secretary. January 20, 1910.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, January 21, 1910

 

Will probated

The will of Clairborne Lisle was probated Monday. The will of Clairborne Lisle was dated December 20th, 1909. It provides for the payment of all debts and that he shall be buried decently but without ostentation. A suitable stone shall be erected at his grave with the inscription: “What conscience dictates to be done, or warns me not to do, is more than Hell to shun, or Heaven pursue.” It recites that all real estate had been conveyed by deed except lot in cemetery which is left free for the burial of any children who may desire to be buried there. Each of the living children of J.D. Lisle is left one thousand dollars except Jesse, who is given $500. These legacies are left to the children instead of the father because he has a mania for speculation and it would soon be squandered. Each of the five living children of Lou Ann Eubank and each of the three living children of Nancy C. Duckworth, is left five hundred dollars. Ernest C. Lisle is left one dollar, the will saying that his father, Marcus Lisle, had received more than the other children. Mrs. Minerva Hodgkin is given ten shares of Building and Loan stock, the dues on same to be paid out of the estate. This is in recognition of her care and attention during testators’ sickness. Minerva Hodgkin, Thomas Lisle and the children of D.C. Lisle were each given twenty-one shares of Winchester Bank Stock and Mrs. Pora Oliver 12 shares of the same. She to have proceeds for life and at her death to go to Charles Oliver. Testator owned fourteen shares of stock in a bank at White city, Kansas, and two and a half shares in the Louisville National Banking Co. These are to be sold and with the proceeds from his notes and choses in action, to be used in paying the cash legacies given. What is left is to be given equally to Mrs. Hodgkin, Thomas Lisle and the children of D. C. Lisle, and if there is a deficit they are to make it up. Thos. Lisle and H. Clay Hodgkin are named as executors without bond. A codicil of the same date prescribes, if any legatee attempts to break the will he is to lose what is left to him.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, January 25, 1910

 

Card of thanks

We desire to tender our heartfelt thanks to the neighbors and friends for their sympathy and ministrations during the illness and death of our father and grandfather, Claiborne Lisle; and especially are grateful for the numerous flora offerings and for the resolutions of sympathy from the Directors of the Winchester Bank, of which institution he had so long been a faithful official.

CHILDREN AND GRANDCHILDREN

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, January 25, 1910

 

Will contest

Friday morning a copy of the will of the late Claiborne Lisle and a statement of Ben K. Duckworth, Ernest Duckworth, Esther Couchman and her husband, Frank M. Couchman and E.C. Lisle, all of them grandchildren of the deceased, except Mr. Couchman, versus the other heirs of the deceased, who are named in the statement on appeal from the order of the County court probating the will of Mr. Lisle. This is the first formal step in contesting the validity of the will.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, March 22, 1910

 

Special term of court

As intimated some time ago, Judge Benton has called a special term of Circuit court for Monday, October 31st, for the trial of the case of Esther Couchman, etc., against the executors of the late Claiborne Lisle: It being an attempt to break the will of the latter. Judge Benton has refused to preside and a Special Judge will be appointed to try it.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, October 7, 1910

 

Circuit court

A special term of Circuit court for yesterday was called some time ago by Judge Benton and the contest over the will of the late Clairborne Lisle was set for trial. Judge Benton declined to preside, and Governor Willson, was notified. Saturday he appointed Judge Walker, of Lancaster, to preside. Court convened yesterday morning, and the morning of the first day was consumed in securing a jury. The following comprise the jury: Elias Curry, J.J. Thornton, Cliff Haggard, W.S. Keene, Robert G. Wallis, Joe Berryman, J.E. Guilfoyle, J.L. Skinner, W.E. Heflin, Charles Hadley, C.H. Adams, and R.E. Fox. Quite a number of the jurors are performing jury service for the first time. From the array of witnesses the trial of the case may consume several days.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, November 1, 1910

 

Will broken

A special term of Circuit court convened Monday morning to try the contest over the   will of the late Claiborne Lisle. It was bitterly contested on both sides and consumed the entire week including some night sessions. Judge Benton declined to preside and Gov. Willson appointed Judge L.L. Walker, of Lancaster, to occupy the bench. Scores of witnesses testified and speeches were made in support of the will by John M. Stevenson, of this city, and Robert Harding, of Danville. In behalf of the contestors, arguments were made by Dwight L. Pendleton of this city and John Allen, of Lexington. The last speech was made Saturday morning and the case was given to the jury. It did not take long for the jury to decide and they soon brought in a verdict that the instrument before them was not the last will and testament of Mr. Lisle. This verdict was signed by ten of the jury, Charles Hadley and Robert Fox refusing to agree to it. A session of court was held late in the afternoon at which time Attorneys for the propounders of the will asked for a new trial and presented grounds for the request. Judge Walker took the matter under advisement and will give his decision at the regular December term of court. The propounders of the will were represented by J.M. Stevenson, Jas. F. Winn, and F.H. Haggard, of this city, and Robert Harding, of Danville. The contestants, by Pendleton & Bush, of this city, and John Allen, of Lexington. The will disposed entirely of personal property as the testator had previously disposed of his real estate by deed. No matter which way Judge Walker decides the question of a new trial, the case will likely go to the Court of Appeals eventually.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, November 8, 1910

Lisle, Claiborne The Winchester Sun   Fri., 2-8-1952
Lisle, Claiborne (Will Case) The Winchester News Wed., 1-24-1912; Thur., 7-10-1913
Lisle, Claiborne Winn The Winchester Sun   Tues., 5-4-1965
Lisle, Clarence The Winchester Sun   Mon., 1-9-1967
Lisle, Clayton ONE of the saddest accidents that it has been our lot to chronicle for a long time, resulted in the death of Clayton Lisle., the seventeen-year-old son of Squire Jas. D. Lisle Saturday. The young man had a little rifle of which he was very fond, and in the use of which he had become very expert. Saturday he took his gun for the purpose of shooting a crow. While in the house he dropped the breech of the gun or put it down too hard, and the charge exploded. The ball struck near the corner of his mouth and ranged upward into the brain, inflicting a wound from which he died in a few hours without recovering consciousness. Funeral services were held at the family residence and the remains were deposited in the cemetery at this place.

The Democrat, Wednesday, January 18, 1893.

Lisle, Clyde Piersall The Winchester Sun   Wed., 7-27-1960
Lisle, Connie The marriage of Connie Lisle and Miss Julia Elkin, of Elkin, is announced to take place during the Christmas holidays.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, Nov. 27, 1894

Lisle, daughter BORN   Thursday, to the wife of John R. Lisle, a daughter.

The Democrat, Wednesday, September 30, 1891.

Lisle, David Congreve The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-11-1972
Lisle, David Congreve Sr. D. C. Lisle has received requests in the last few days from several parts of the districts asking him to stand for the unexpired term of his brother. Marcus, and stating that this precedent had been established in the past. Mr. Lisle is thoroughly acquainted with the political affairs of the district, having been prominent in the management of this brother’s campaigns, and would make a good Congressman.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, July 13, 1894.

 

D.C. Lisle has conducted to be a candidate for the Democratic nomination to fill his brother’s unexpired term in Congress. This action has been taken after mature consideration and in response to numerous requests from various parts of the district and from among the best Democrats of the counties composing it. He is thoroughly conversant with the politics of the district, having been prominent in the various campaigns of his brother and being in touch with the prominent Democratic leaders everywhere. One of the most prominent factors in arriving at this conclusion was that it was the dying request of Marcus that Connie should succeed him.   If this should be the case, the latter could take up the Congressional work where it was left off by our dead Congressman, as he has been in full touch, with him in regard to all public affairs. If nominated he will add much strength to the ticket in this part of the district.   The formal announcement will appear in our next.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, July 17, 1894.

 

“Both Judge Beckner and Mr. Connie Lisle state they are willing to submit their claims as candidates for Congress to Clark county for settlement. We shall be very glad to have Clark county settle this matter between these two gentlemen, and certainly, since it is on all hands, conceded that Clark should name the candidate to fill the unexpired term, no fairer adjustment of the matter can be proposed. A settlement such as these gentlemen say they are willing to submit to, will be the very fairest method of disposing of the question.   Let us near from Clark.-Mt. Sterling Advocate.

We do not know the views of either of the gentlemen on this subject, and however this matter is settled, it will give us great pleasure to support either Judge Beckner or Mr. Lisle, and we believe either would make a congressman worthy of the district. The truth of the matter is, no agreement made between these gentlemen is binding upon the Democrats of the district. It has the Democrats of the district. It has passed beyond them, and the district committee will decide how it is done. While we think it is right and just that the nominee should come from Clark county, we think that the democrats of the Wolfe or any other county should have a say as to which of the Clark county candidates they prefer to support.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, July 20, 1894.

 

JUDGE W. M. BECKNER

At the Campton Convention Judge Beckner, of Clark county was recommended to the Democrats of the district as a man in every way qualified to fill out the unexpired term.   This recommendation, be it understood, carries combined judgement of the delegates in convention assembled (these delegates, by the way, being representative men of the district).   And expressed by them may amount to.   It was not proposed to crowd any man off the track, nor do we wish to forestall any good Democrat in his desire to offer for nomination, for this term, by anything we may say of Jedge Beckner now, or at any time, till the nominee is declared.

In Judge Beckner we recognize a man of unquestioned ability; a man of wide experience in legislative affairs, and a man of integrity. In short, a man who can fill this short term, not for the money in it, but to the credit and advancement of his State and his district.   We sincerely hope there will no one offer for the short term against Judge Beckner, not alone because we recognized in him a peculiar position to which he aspires, but as well because we think the tacit promises of a support from so many delegates, in so many counties, can mean nothing less than needless expense and defeat to any man who opposes him. Judge Beckner will no doubt have a clear field and when elected, will go to Congress so well equipped for the service that he can at once take his place in the ranks of the workers in the House. Almost any other man in the district, who would be willing to accept the nomination would be about as much use to us during this “piece of term,” as a wooden-man.

(When the above was penned we did not know of any opposition to Judge Beckner. Later we are informed Mr. D. Connie Lisle, brother of the late Congressman, is an announced candidate.)-Mt. Sterling Advocate.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, July 24, 1894.

 

OFFICERS

Of the Democratic Primary election, Aug 6, 1894.

THE Democratic County Committee met yesterday afternoon for the purpose of appointing election officers and the transaction of other business. S. J. Shinfessel who had been selected as member from Goodes declined to accept and W. F. Clemons was chosen as the member from that voting place.

A mass meeting at the Court house Saturday, August 11th, at two o’clock was ordered, to choose between W. M. Beckner and D. C. Lisle as to which should be considered the choice of the county for the unexpired term of Hon. M. C. Lisle in Congress.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, July 24, 1894.

 

The withdrawal of Mr. D. C. Lisle from the contest in the Tenth district for the nomination for the short term for Congress gives Judge W. M. Beckner a walk over for the place, as it is not thought the Republicans will nominate against him, and it will also strengthen Hon. J. M. Kendall, the nominee for the long term, who is now certain to be elected by a good majority. It was feared that a squabble would arise over the short term which would do much damage to the party in   the district, but that has now been adjusted. Judge Beckner will strengthen the ticket very materially, as he is a strong man on the stump and with the people, and will make as active canvass not only until the special election, but until November.—Courier-Journal

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, July 31, 1894

 

D. C. Lisle, brother of the lamented Congressman, Hon. Marcus C. Lisle, has withdrawn from the race for the nomination to succeed his brother, and the field is clear for Judge W. M. Beckner. He will make a good running mate for Little Joe and, in our humble opinion, they will run so far ahead of Mr. Hopkins that he will have to inquire “where is he at” when the polls close in November.—Hazel Green herald

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, July 31, 1894

 

The withdrawal of Hon. D. C. Lisle of Clark, from the race for Congress leaves Judge W. M. Beckner a clear field for the Democratic nomination for the short term. There is no man in our acquaintance who can so ably fill the unexpired term as can Judge Beckner. He will without doubt be found giving an intelligent reason for his position on every question that comes up, and no Democrat in Congress will be truer to the principles of the party than will Judge Beckner. He will not forget to keep a wide-open eye on anything and everything that concerns his district. We do not care who he is, no man who has represented us or will in future represent this district, will surpass Judge Beckner in a keen interest in all that looks toward the material advancement of Eastern Kentucky. If he had a full term or so before him he would so entrench himself in the good opinion of the masses that it would be next to impossible for any man to   beat him.—Mt. Sterling Advocate.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, August 3, 1894

 

Claiborne Lisle this week received a letter from Malcolm Johnson, Consul to Pernambuco, Brazil, expressing sympathy for the death of Hon. M. C. Lisle. Mr. Johnson was appointed from Newberry, South Carolina and formerly purchased horses in this county for the Southern market.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, August 31, 1894

 

As has been our custom for the past thirty years we took in the “sarkus” Tuesday. D. C. Lisle was on hand. He said to us at a former circus: “This is an institution that I always patronize. When a little bare-footed boy I drove a yoke of oxen on a show day.   After reaching the city with the oxen, which my father had sold, he said: ‘My son, you run along home.’ Well, I tell you, Dock, I never felt so let down in my life. I have been coon-hunting, been to candy pullings, camp meetings, horse races and all other places of amusements but I have never hated to leave a place so badly as I did to leave Winchester and go home that day. I learned in early childhood how good and pleasant it was for father and son to dwell together in harmony, and of course, I went back home; and on my way back I said to myself: ‘When I get to be a man I mean to go to every durn circus that ever comes to Winchester. ”And few resolutions have I ever made that I have kept so faithfully as this one.”

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, October 11, 1898.

 

D. C. LISLE DIES OF HEART ATTACK

Former Editor and Postmaster Of This City succumbs Suddenly At His Home In Paris

D. C. Lisle, age 73, died suddenly at his home in Paris about 7 o’clock Wednesday morning. Heart failure caused death. He arose at his customary hour Wednesday morning and was in apparent good health. Mr. Lisle was in Winchester Monday to attend the funeral of his brother-in-law, W. P. Winn, who also died suddenly from the same cause.

Mr. Lisle was a native of Clark County and a son of the late Claybourne Lisle. He married Miss Minnie Winn of this county, who survives him. He was a brother of the late Congressman M. C. Lisle.

The deceased resided in Clark County for a number of years and at one time was editor of the Clark County Democrat. In 1893, when Cleveland was inaugurated, Mr. Lisle was appointed postmaster of Winchester. He held this office for several years before moving to Bourbon county where he engaged in farming and stock raising. In Bourbon county Mr. Lisle although retired from active political life, was prominent in the counsels of his party and served as chairman of the Democratic County Committee several times. He is survived by his wife, two brothers, Winn and Thos. Lisle, and a number of nieces and nephews in Clark county.

Funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon at 3 o’clock at the Paris Cemetery with Rev. W. E. Ellis officiating.

THE WINCHESTER SUN FEB 13, 1924

 

LISLE

David Cosgrove Lisle, aged about seventy, died suddenly at his home on Link Avenue, early Wednesday Morning, his death coming as a shock to the community that had known him so long. Mr. Lisle had been engaged in doing some work around his home, and came in to breakfast, telling Mrs. Lisle that he did not feel well. Mrs. Lisle went into the kitchen to get him a cup of coffee, and upon her return was horrified to find Mr. Lisle dead.

Mr. Lisle was a native of Clark County, and was well-known throughout-out Central Kentucky. He was for a number of years editor and publisher of The Winchester Democrat. Several years ago he moved to Bourbon County, and was engaged in farming. A few years ago he moved to Paris to make his home, residing on Link Avenue. He was interested in all that pertained to the business of Paris, and gave his time and attention to helping all the movements having the good of the city and community as principal objects. He was a member of the Christian Church.

Besides his widow, who, was before her marriage, Minnie W. Winn, of Winchester, Mr. Lisle is survived by the following children; Mrs White Varden, D. C. Lisle, Jr., and Claiborne Lisle, of Paris; Mrs. William Senter, of Hazard; Capitan N. W. Lisle, of Arizona; one brother, Thomas Lisle, and one sister, Mrs. Jessie Hodgkin, both of Winchester. He was a brother-in-law of James M. McClure, of Paris.

The funeral was held, at three o’clock yesterday afternoon, with services conducted at the grave in the Paris Cemetery, by Rev. W. E. Ellis, pastor of the Paris Christian Church. The pall-bearers were: Harvey Lisle, Sam Hodgkin, Clay Hodgkin, Shields Bush, Rufus Lisle and James McClure, Jr.

A lingual series of deaths is connected with the death of Mr. Lisle. Several days ago Mrs. W. H. Strossman of Winchester, died suddenly at her home in that city. Mr. W. P. Winn, a relative of Mr. Lisle, dropped dead at the grave side while attending the funeral. Mr. Lisle was a pall-bearer at Mr. Winn’s funeral, and a few days later was himself cold in death in the sudden summons.

THE BOURBON NEWS FEB. 14, 1924

Lisle, David Congreve Sr. D. C. LISLE DIES OF HEART ATTACK

Former Editor and Postmaster Of This City succumbs Suddenly At His Home In Paris

D. C. Lisle, age 73, died suddenly at his home in Paris about 7 o’clock Wednesday morning. Heart failure caused death. He arose at his customary hour Wednesday morning and was in apparent good health. Mr. Lisle was in Winchester Monday to attend the funeral of his brother-in-law, W. P. Winn, who also died suddenly from the same cause.

Mr. Lisle was a native of Clark County and a son of the late Claybourne Lisle. He married Miss Minnie Winn of this county, who survives him. He was a brother of the late Congressman M. C. Lisle.

The deceased resided in Clark County for a number of years and at one time was editor of the Clark County Democrat. In 1893, when Cleveland was inaugurated, Mr. Lisle was appointed postmaster of Winchester. He held this office for several years before moving to Bourbon county where he engaged in farming and stock raising. In Bourbon county Mr. Lisle although retired from active political life, was prominent in the counsels of his party and served as chairman of the Democratic County Committee several times. He is survived by his wife, two brothers, Winn and Thos. Lisle, and a number of nieces and nephews in Clark county.

Funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon at 3 o’clock at the Paris Cemetery with Rev. W. E. Ellis officiating.

THE WINCHESTER SUN FEB 13, 1924

 

LISLE

David Cosgrove Lisle, aged about seventy, died suddenly at his home on Link Avenue, early Wednesday Morning, his death coming as a shock to the community that had known him so long. Mr. Lisle had been engaged in doing some work around his home, and came in to breakfast, telling Mrs. Lisle that he did not feel well. Mrs. Lisle went into the kitchen to get him a cup of coffee, and upon her return was horrified to find Mr. Lisle dead.

Mr. Lisle was a native of Clark County, and was well-known throughout-out Central Kentucky. He was for a number of years editor and publisher of The Winchester Democrat. Several years ago he moved to Bourbon County, and was engaged in farming. A few years ago he moved to Paris to make his home, residing on Link Avenue. He was interested in all that pertained to the business of Paris, and gave his time and attention to helping all the movements having the good of the city and community as principal objects. He was a member of the Christian Church.

Besides his widow, who, was before her marriage, Minnie W. Winn, of Winchester, Mr. Lisle is survived by the following children; Mrs. White Varden, D. C. Lisle, Jr., and Claiborne Lisle, of Paris; Mrs. William Senter, of Hazard; Capitan N. W. Lisle, of Arizona; one brother, Thomas Lisle, and one sister, Mrs. Jessie Hodgkin, both of Winchester. He was a brother-in-law of James M. McClure, of Paris.

The funeral was held, at three o’clock yesterday afternoon, with services conducted at the grave in the Paris Cemetery, by Rev. W. E. Ellis, pastor of the Paris Christian Church. The pall-bearers were: Harvey Lisle, Sam Hodgkin, Clay Hodgkin, Shields Bush, Rufus Lisle and James McClure, Jr.

A lingual series of deaths is connected with the death of Mr. Lisle. Several days ago Mrs. W. H. Strossman of Winchester, died suddenly at her home in that city. Mr. W. P. Winn, a relative of Mr. Lisle, dropped dead at the grave side while attending the funeral. Mr. Lisle was a pall-bearer at Mr. Winn’s funeral, and a few days later was himself cold in death in the sudden summons.

THE BOURBON NEWS FEB. 14, 1924

 

The Winchester Sun   Fri., 2-15-1924

Lisle, Dora Marriage Announcement

Mr. P.C. Lisle announces the marriage of his daughter, Dora, to Mr. Marshall Pruitt, to take place October 8th at four o’clock, P.M., at the home of the bride’s sister, Mrs. Sam P. Locknane. No cards but friends and relatives invited.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, October 6, 1908

 

Lisle-Prewitt

Married, by Eld. James W. Harding, Oct. 8th, at the home of Mr. Samuel Locknane, in this city, Mr. Marshall Prewitt and Miss Dora Lisle. Mr. Prewitt is the son of Mr. and Mrs. S.E. Prewitt, and is a genial and popular young gentleman. His bride is one of our sweetest and most lovable young ladies. We extend to them our heartiest congratulations and best wishes.

The Winchester News   Monday, October 12, 1908

Lisle, Earl R. Death of Earl Lisle

Earl R. Lisle, son of Mr. and Mrs. John R. Lisle, of Elkin, died Sunday night of typhoid fever, aged fourteen years. The funeral services at the home Tuesday morning were conducted by Elder J.W. Harding and burial in the family burying ground. He was a bright, promising lad and his parents have much sympathy.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, December 3, 1909

 

Mr. Earl Lisle, aged fifteen years, died at his home at Elkin Sunday night of typhoid fever. Funeral services were conducted by Bro. Harding. The family and friends have     our heartfelt sympathy.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, December 10, 1909

Lisle, Easter Hampton A Tribute

The incidence so well related by Col. S. M. Boone, in the life of Marcus Lisle makes me glad that the noble mother of the faithful son has not been forgotten. “Childhood days now pass forgotten.” “Forms and scenes of long ago crowd memory’s walls,” and one of the most vivid pictures is the form and face of Easter Hampton Lisle. Life had not been what she expected it, but upon the faithful features there were few lines of deep trouble. Not a murmur ever passed the thin, white lips; she scarcely paused to send a regret into the grave of the past. She loved her children and the example and words of encouragement always brought them nearer to her side. And when thirty-three years ago, a dear boy was laid in the weary arms, perhaps she dreamed of the success she did not live to see. She was never impatient and the course events took were only the fulfilling of the divine plan. Who knows the hopes that lived when she saw the success attendant upon his youth. She passed away before she could behold the battles he fought and won upon this earth. Noble quiet woman! We can almost hear the words of welcome, and the first question asked when heaven’s home was reached, “Where’s Mother?”

Fannie F. Stryker     Windsor, Mo.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, September 4, 1894

Lisle, Edward Jouett The Winchester Sun   Tues., 2-3-1953
Lisle, Ellen Winn June 27th, of cholera infantum, Ellen Winn, infant daughter of D. C. and Minnie Lisle, aged eleven months. Funeral services at the residence conducted by Eld. J.S. Kendrick.

The Winchester Democrat     Wed., 7-4-1888

Lisle, Elsie Catherine The Winchester Sun   Mon., 6-30-1913
Lisle, Ernest Claiborne   (Jack) The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-9-1917

 

SERVICES OVER YOUNG FARMER HELD SUNDAY AFTERNOON AT GRAVE.

Funeral services over the remains of E. C. (Jack) Lisle, were held at the grave Sunday afternoon, by Rev. William Cumming. That young Lisle was widely known in Central Kentucky was evidenced by the number of out of town people who were in attendance at his funeral, the procession being one of the largest for several months.

THE WINCHESTER SUN, MONDAY NOV. 12, 1917

Lisle, Ernest Manson The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-21, 5-22-1962
Lisle, Ethel J. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 11-13-1982
Lisle, F. M. J. B. Lisle & co. vs. R. E. Bush & co.

……We the jury find that the paper produced before us and purporting to be the last will and testament of F. M. Lisle decd. and dated October 30th 1876 not to be the last will and testament of said F. M. Lisle decd……order admitting this will to probate is reversed…..continued.

Order Book 19; P. 223 – 224; November Court 1885

 

J. B. Lisle & co. vs. R. E. Bush & co.

…..on motion R. E. Bush executor of F. M. Lisle decd. and the devises of said decedent….

Order Book 19; P. 449; January Court 1887

 

J. B. Lisle & co. vs. R. E. Bush & co.

…..report filed January 13, 1887 ordered approved……..

Order Book 19; P. 545; May Court 1887

Lisle, F. M. J. B. Lisle vs. R. E. Bush

….admitting the will of F. M. Lisle decd. to probate be and it is hereby discussed and that the will aforesaid is the true last will and testament of said decedent…it is further adjudged that the propounders of the will to wit, R. E. Bush individually and as executor of F. M. Lisle decd., John Couchman, Mary K. Couchman, W. L. Bush, Rosa L. Bush, William Clark, Rachel Clark, James Prewitt and Sarah Ann Prewitt recover of J. B. Lisle, J. B. Carroll, A. J. Brunner as guardian of Tuly M. Bruner and Mary J. Bruner and John E. Baldwin their costs herein…..

Order Book 20; P. 576 – 578; March Court 1890

Lisle, Fannie The Winchester Sun   Tues., 5-4, 5-5-1965
Lisle, Fielden Sr. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-4, 11-5-1988
Lisle, Frances Marion DIED

Lisle—- Miss Fannie Lisle, died peacefully at midnight last night. Due notice of the funeral will be given.

THE LEXINGTON, MORNING TRANSCRIPT JULY 15, 1887

 

DEATH OF MISS LISLE

Miss Fannie Lisle died at her home, three miles west of this city, Thursday night at 12, O’clock. That she must die had been the conviction of her physicians since the Friday preceding. She suffered but little during the last hours of her illness.

For the benefit of foreign readers the peculiarly interesting circumstances of her death are reproduced. Miss Lisle was a popular and most attractive member of the highest of the young society of this community. About two weeks since she was returning from a party at the handsome country home of Daniel Swigert Esq. about six miles north of this city. She was being driven in a two horse buggy by a worthy young gentleman named Scearce, and in passing through this city on her way home about 1 o’clock at night the breast yoke of the horses came loose and they ran off, throwing Miss Lisle and Mr. Scearce out in the street. Mr. Scearce was but slightly hurt but Miss Lisle’s condition has been regarded as very critical from the beginning and great public solicitude for her welfare has occasioned daily inquiry as to her condition Though the result is what the community had learned to expect, this calcination of the tragedy will naturally cast a gloom over the elegant young society in which she moved.

THE LEXINGTON DAILY PRESS SAT JULY 16, 1887

 

IN MEMORY OF FRANCES MARION LISLE

On the morning of the 30th of June last the residents of Lexington and the State were pained and shocked to hear of the distressing accident which had befallen Miss Frances Marion Lisle.

On Thursday morning last she passed peacefully into that dreamless sleep that God has given as a last boon to them who believe in the awakening into His merciful presence. One universal sigh grief, sympathy, and condolence for her death, for her grief-stricken parents, her loved sisters and brothers. But, ah ! how deep the throbs of the aching hearts those who knew and loved her.

In spite of tender nursing, skilled physicians, and the prayers of all, she died, and on Thursday morning God took her. Her placid, gentle, lovely life has gone out like the glorious day, when the dying sun paints the clouds with glory, giving promise of another rising on the morrow. Though it leaves us in the twilight to weep for her, yet we, with straining eyes and aching hearts can but think of her gentle spirit soaring to realms made more heavenly by its presence.

A woman, pure, true, gentle, beautiful, a womanly woman, a gentle mentor, a brilliant conversationalist, a refined and cultured woman, she was one of the fairest, loveliest flowers that ever graced the garden of society, And thus untimely to be plucked by the hand of God, our human intellects cannot understand why.

A tender, delicate flower that bloomed in perfect purity and beauty on earth. Aye even Heaven itself, jealous of the earth for the possession of so fair a bud, struck it down in anger and transplanted it there to Blossom and bloom again.

“A perfect nobly planned,” Frances Marion Lisle held sway over friends by the hundreds; if she ever experienced grief and disappointments, and who has not, she would not burden others with them, but her joys and her pleasures she was ever anxious to share with those around her. Kind in heart, gentle in manner, sympathetic in feeling, generous and whole-souled, ever ready to aid the unfortunate, ever willing to help the weak, eager to do justice to all always speaking a kind word of others, protecting and cherishing her own self respect and high regard for the noble qualities of others, no unkind word ever passed her lips. Loved by her the bitterness and grief for her inclaincholy death is trebled. No woman ever lived of whom more kind things were said. Even the very dumb animals that knew her worshipped Fannie Lisle. Her cheering words, her sweet voice and lovely face invited the Many a young girl’s heart has sobbed its secrets out on her bosom in gentle confidence, many a young has had its bleeding wounds bound up and healed by her loving tenderness, many a tear stained face and streaming eye had been brightened and cleared by her gentle touch and soothing hand. The confidant and mentor of her devoted friends, how sadly, how deeply will they as well as all miss her. The people, the press, offer deepest sympathy for her heart-broken family.

Did heaven crave another star,

The earth is thus to be despoiled of her;

That we must count her with things that were,

Not with the things that are?

Or did God pity her, and take

Her, kindly, from this world’s harassing strife,

Into a purer, and a calmer life

For here Redeemer’s sake?

We know not, yet, how this may be;

Our eyes, with bitter tears, are blinded so,

We cannot see God’s plan, we only know

He said “come unto me.”

R B A

THE LEXINGTON DAILY PRESS JULY 16, 1887

 

FUNERAL

The funeral services of Fannie, daughter of Rufus and M. M. Lisle, will take place from the residence of her father, this evening at 4 o’clock. Services conducted by Elders J. W. McGarvery and John S. Shouse. Friends of the family respectfully invited.

THE LEXINGTON DAILY PRESS JULY 16, 1887

 

A CORRECTION OF AN ERROR REGARDING THE DEATH OF MISS LISLE

There is current in this community a report to the effect that the immediate cause of the death of Miss Lisle was erysipelas induced by an attempt of her surgeons to transfer flesh from her arm to her face, by a process which is familiar. The report is entirely without foundation in fact, and has come to the knowledge of Mr. Lisle very much to his regret. This operation is never attempted by skilled surgeons except in instances where the general health of the party to be operated upon is very good.

This explanation is not made simply as a means of allaying a piece of baseless gossip, but as being in justice to the surgical skill of this community.

THE LEXINGTON MORNING TRANSCRIPT TUESDAY   07-19-1887

Lisle, Francis M. Mary Lisle & co. vs. J. B. Lisle

The defendant Francis M. Lisle having departed this life testate since the last term of this court leaving John A. Couchman and Mary K. Couchman, Rachel M. Bush, Rosa L. Bush, William L. Bush, Sarah Ann Bush, R. E. Bush , Minerva Bush his only devises, his death is now noted of record and this case is revived in the name of the said devises to wit: John A. Couchman and Mary K. Couchman, Rachel M. Bush, Rosa L. Bush, William L. Bush, Sarah Ann Bush, R. E. Bush and Minerva Bush.

Order Book 17; P. 191; May Court 1879

 

J. B. Lisle & co. vs. R. E. Bush & co.

Same vs. Same

George B. Nelson appeared in open court and qualified as curator of the estate of F. M. Lisle decd. and executed bond…..R. E. Bush who has been acting as executor of F. M. Lisle decd. deliver and turn over to said Curator upon his request all the assets and property of deceased under his control…….

Order Book 17; P. 500; November Court 1880

Lisle, Frank M. Mr. Frank Lisle, of this county, who has been afflicted with paralysis for the last 12 years, died of that disease, Friday night. His funeral was preached at Forest Grove church, Sunday, by Eld. J. W. Harding.

The Semi-Weekly Sun     Fri., 2-11-1879

 

Will Book 1, Page 341

Dated: October 30, 1876

Recorded: February 24 and March 24, 1879

 

Robt. E. Bush has qualified as executor of F. M. Lisle dec’d.

The Semi-Weekly Sun     Tue., 3-25-1879

 

The will of F. M. Lisle, deceased, was probated yesterday, but will be contested in the Circuit Court.

The Semi-Weekly Sun     Tue., 3-25-1879

 

J. Tribble, John F. Bush and James Hodgkin have been appointed appraisers of the estate of F. M. Lisle, dec’d.

The Semi-Weekly Sun     Tue., 3-25-1879

 

It was reported on the streets last night that the famous Lisle will case from this county had been decided by the Court of Appeals, and that the will had been sustained.

The Winchester Democrat   Wednesday 12-18-1889

 

The Frank M. Lisle will case was finally disposed of by the Court of Appeals last week. It said that there substantially no proof of either mental incompetence or undue influence, and that the Circuit Court must dismiss the appeal thus leaving the will probated without further trial.   This litigation began nearly eleven years ago, and has been hotly contested. In the Court of Appeals the devices were represented by William Lindsay and W. M. Beckner and the contestants by Breckinridge and Shelby and C. D. Bronston.

The Winchester Democrat     Wed., 12-25-1889

 

In the Court of Appeals a relic of the famous Bush-Lisle will case bobbed up from this county in the shape of a motion to strike out the names of J. R. Carroll and wife from the execution for costs. These costs will probably amount to a thousand or twelve hundred dollars.

The Winchester Democrat     Wed. 6-25-1890

 

A RELIC of the famous Bush-Lisle will case bobbed up during the late session of Common Pleas Court. Joe Carroll, of Elkin, had by the various proccesses of legal machinery, become responsible on a bond, for the whole costs of the suit about $ 2,800. Judge Scott decided that the bond under which he was held was illegally taken and Mr. Carroll was thus freed from an incubus of   years.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, February 24, 1892.

 

Settled at last

One of the hardest fought legal battles over waged in this county was over the will of     the late Frank Lisle: as a consequence, the costs pile up till they amounted to about $3,200. Joe B. Carroll, of Elkin, and others had given bond for the costs but when matters were investigated it was found that the bond taken by Judge Buckner was for some reason invalid and could not be enforced, at least this was the decision of the lower court which was this week affirmed by the Court of Appeals. This will doubtless lift a load from the mind of Mr. Carroll.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, January 28, 1896

Lisle, Gippie The Winchester Sun   Fri., 1-22-1960
Lisle, Green Paid J.W. Owens $5.00 for coffin for Green Lisle.

Order Book 17; Page 354, 355, 356, 358; October Court 1875

Clark County Courthouse Archives

Lisle, Harry Born, Saturday, to Mr. and Mrs. P.C. Lisle, a ten pound son, Harry.

The Winchester Sun-Sentinel Thursday, October, 3, 1907

Lisle, Harry Phillips The Winchester Sun   Sat., 9-3-1949
Lisle, Harvey Thomas The Winchester Sun   Tues., 7-13, 7-14, 7-21-1965
Lisle, Henry The Semi-Weekly Sun   3-27-1889
Lisle, Henry Henry Lisle vs. David Morton

Executor, Theodore Lisle, suggested the death of Henry Lisle and request the court to revive the case to his name as executor of Henry Lisle.

Order Book 16; P. 607; May Court 1878

 

Henry Lisle vs. David Morton

….motion of Theodore K. Lisle as executor of the plaintiff Henry Lisle now deceased to re docket this action and revive…..Henry Lisle departed this life in the County of Madison in the State of Kentucky….filed last will and testament….continued.

Order Book 17; P. 71 – 73; May Court 1878

 

Henry Lisle executor vs. David Morton

John Stevens filed a petition which in his motion is made a crop petition against David Morton.

Order Book 17; P. 300; November Court 1879

 

Henry Lisle executor vs. David Morton & co.

…defendant filed an answer…

Order Book 17; P. 359; January Court 1880

 

Henry Lisle executor vs. David Morton & co.

John Stevens…filed herein his petition to be made a party defendant…plaintiff Theodore Lisle as executor of Henry Lisle decd….in favor of said Henry Lisle, now deceased….defendant David Morton filed his answer…Theodore Lisle filed herein his reply…

Order Book 17; P. 545 – 547; May Court 1881

 

Shelby Morton vs. Mary J. Morton

Action named above consolidated herewith of Theodore K. Lisle executor of Henry Lisle decd. against David Morton on the 12th day of November 1874 has not been enforced…directed to be sold…..tract of land….on the north side by and belonging to Tarlton Wilson decd. the tract being the same upon which the said David Morton now resides…..tract heretofore released by Henry Morton decd….make report.

Order Book 18; P. 252 – 253; November Court 1882

Lisle, Howard The Winchester Sun   Thur., 3-20, 3-21-2003
Lisle, infant The Winchester Sun   Sat., 6-28-1913
Lisle, infant daughter Died—Near Elkin, Saturday, of pneumonia, the infant daughter of Thomas Lisle and wife, aged fifteen months. The funeral services were held by Rev. Richard French.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, April 19, 1893

Lisle, infant daughter The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-22-1929
Lisle, infant son Died, Sept. 2nd, of brain trouble. Infant son of John R. Lisle, of Elkin.

The Winchester Democrat     Wed., 9-5-1888

Lisle, infant son DIED-Friday, the infant son of Judge M. C. Lisle died and was buried beside the body of its mother, who preceded it but a few days.

The Democrat, Wednesday, March 22, 1893.

Lisle, J. Clark J. Clark Lisle administrator vs. J. Clark Lisle heirs

The report of sale of the interest of J. Clark Lisle decd. in the dower of Mrs. Nancy Lisle having been confirmed….commissioner T. S. Tucker is hereby directed to convey to John Lisle the purchase the undivided one seventh interest of J. Clark Lisle decd in said dower being the same interest sold by William G. Sympson master commissioner under a decree…..being the same interest which said T. S. Tucker as master commissioner was directed to convey at the   last term but failed to do because Manson Lisle one of the parties to this action….T. S. Ecton administrator of J. Clark Lisle….

Order Book 14; P. 117; November Court 1870

 

J. C. Lisle administrator vs. J. C. Lisle heirs

Thomas S. Tucker Master Commissioner produced a deed of conveyance to John Lisle ….. certified.

Order Book 14; P. 172; November Court 1870

 

J. C. Lisle administrator vs. J. C. Lisle heirs

Thomas S. Tucker Master Commissioner …paid…

Order Book 14; P. 175; November Court 1870

Lisle, James J. C. Lisle’s Admin. vs. J. C. Lisle & Heirs &c ………Equity

…………..report the claims against the estate of J. Clark Lisle dec. The administrator of James Lisle dec. filed two receipts.

Order Book 12; P. 555; May Court 1867

Lisle, James Lisle, Ecton vs. Lisle and company

Ordered that T. S. Tucker master commissioner convey on behalf of the infant children of Manson Lisle decd., John R. Lisle, William J. Lisle, Andrew J. Lisle, Nannie J. Lisle and Phillip M. Lisle their interest in the lands of their father Manson Lisle decd. that is such lands as he inherited from his father James Lisle decd. to the other heirs of James Lisle, Amanda Ecton, John Lisle, Rufus Lisle, Claiborne Lisle in accordance with the agreement for the petition of the lands of James Lisle Decd…..

Cause continued.

Order Book 14; P. 328; November Court 1871

Lisle, James Clark James Clark Lisle administrator vs. ___Creditors

……….Master commissioner ordered to sell land to pay administrator…ordered continued.

Order Book 13; P. 62 – 63; November Court 1867

 

J. Clark Lisle administrator vs. J. Clark Lisle creditors & co.

Master report filed.

Order Book 13; P. 257; July Court 1868

 

J. Clark Lisle administrator vs. J. Clark Lisle creditors & co.

Land assigned to Mrs. Nancy Lisle as dower sold to John Lisle…..cause continued.

Order Book 13; P. 465; May Court 1869

Lisle, James D. On Monday of last week Jas. D. Lisle was kicked on the knee by a horse. The limb has since inflamed and serious consequences are feared.

The Democrat   Wednesday January 15, 1890

 

SOME months ago Jas. D. Lisle bought John F. Bush his farm Southwest of this city, and moved to it shortly afterward. It is alleged that Cicero Price had rented this farm for the present year and next year, and writings were drawn. For his failure to obtain this farm Mr. Price sues Squire Lisle in the Circuit Court for $ 6,000 damages.

The Democrat, Wednesday, April 27, 1892.

 

Squire James D. Lisle has been quite ill for some weeks and is not much better at present. He suffers from lung disease.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, November 15, 1893

 

The little daughter of Jas. D. Lisle was severely burned about the body and face Saturday night by her clothes catching fire from a grate.

The Winchester Democrat; Wednesday, December 20, 1893

 

The family of Jas. D Lisle is sadly afflicted. He has long been confined to his bed. His eldest son is sick nigh unto death of fever, another child is ill of the same disease while a little girl is slowly recovering from the effects of terrible burns.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, January 10, 1894

 

In this issue we announce Squire Jas. D. Lisle as an independent candidate for County Judge. He has been a member of the Board of Magistrates for the past ten years, and his decisions have been honest, fearless, expostrous of what he believed to be right. He has always been an uncompromising Democrat, and we should have been glad to see him submit his claims to the regular party organization; but the fact that he has seen fit to do otherwise is another evidence of his independent, fearless spirit, and he honestly believes he is right.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday June 22, 1894

 

LISLE, We are authorized to announce Jas. D. Lisle as a candidate for County Judge, subject to the action of the legal voters at the November election.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, June 29, 1894

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, August 14, 1894

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, August 21, 1894

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, August 28, 1894

 

For County Judge

LISLE; We are authorized to announce Jas. D. Lisle as a candidate for County Judge, subject to the action of the legal voters at the November election

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, September 25, 1894

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, September 28, 1894

 

SQUIRE JAS. D. LISLE who has been an independent candidate for County Judge is no longer on the track.   He would not be used as a cat’s paw to help Squire Reed and other Republicans pull chestnuts out of the fire.   Squire Lisle may not be right in all things, but he is hones, and what he does is open and above board.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, October 30, 1894.

 

Serious Accident.

Squire Jas D. Lisle fell from a wagon loaded with rye yesterday and was badly and perhaps fatally hurt. His arm and collar bone were broken and it is thought his hip was also broken.   Drs. Frank Jones and Frank Johnson were summoned to attend to him.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, July 12, 1895.

 

Sent to the asylum

James D. Lisle, of this county, who has been an inmate of a Lexington sanitarium for some time, was tried before a jury on a charge of lunacy and was adjudged to be of unsound mind and was sent to the asylum Friday.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, September 28, 1909

 

DEATH OF JAMES D. LISLE

James D. Lisle died Tuesday afternoon in Lexington of paralysis, aged sixty-eight years. He was the oldest son of the late Claiborne Lisle, and many years ago suffered an accident from which he has since been contained to his bed.

The remains were brought to this city and interred in the Winchester Cemetery the following afternoon with services at the grave by Rev. Richard French.

The following officiated as pallbearers: Sam P. Hodgkin, Jr., Marcus Lisle, Ernest Lisle, Harvey Lisle, Frank Couchman, and Ben Duckworth.

He leaves a wife, formerly Miss Nannie Hampton, and nine children, Jesse, Charles, and Thornton, Mrs. Waller Quisenberry, Mrs. H. C. Conkwright, Mrs. Catesby Woodford, Mrs. Virgil Hieatt, Misses Ethel and Virginia Lisle.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT   FRIDAY   FEB. 11, 1910

Lisle, James H. (Jimmy) The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-9-1973
Lisle, James Hockaday Sr. Frazer Breckenridge, who stole the horse of Jas. H. Lisle last April, and sold it on the streets, was found guilty and will serve the State for the next seven years. He was a Paris negro and it is said has been there before.

The Winchester Democrat   Wednesday November 16, 1892

 

J.H. LISLE IS CALLED TO REST

Death Claims Aged County citizen Tuesday Afternoon at 2: 20 O’clock.

Mr. J.H. Lisle, 82, died at his home on the Boonesboro Road one and one half miles from the city limits. Tuesday afternoon at 2:20 o’clock. Mr. Lisle was a native of Clark County.

The deceased is Survived by three brothers: A. J. Lisle, of Pilot View, Clark county; J. R. Lisle, Short Street, Winchester and Manson Lisle, of Lexington, and one sister, Mrs. Nannie Lisle, of Dallas, Texas. No funeral arrangements have been made.

THE WINCHESTER SUN TUE. SEPT., 23, 1930

 

LISLE RITES TO BE ON THURSDAY

Services To Be Held At Grave: Winchester Cemetery

Funeral Services for J. H. Lisle who died at his home on the Boonesboro road, Tuesday afternoon, will be held at the grave in the Winchester Cemetery Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock, rev. Charles M. Neal officiating.

Pall bearers will be: Claybourne Lisle, Harvey Lisle, Marcus Lisle, J. H. Lisle, Jr. Ewell Lisle, and Arthur May. Honorary: Jesse Hodgkin, John M. Hodgkin, W. W. Haggard, C. C. Quisenberry, H. C. Butler and Jasper McDonald.

THE WINCHESTER SUN WED., SEPT., 24, 1930

Lisle, James Hockaday Sr. J.H. LISLE IS CALLED TO REST

Death Claims Aged County citizen Tuesday Afternoon at 2: 20 O’clock.

Mr. J.H. Lisle, 82, died at his home on the Boonesboro Road one and one half miles from the city limits. Tuesday afternoon at 2:20 o’clock. Mr. Lisle was a native of Clark County.

The deceased is Survived by three brothers: A. J. Lisle, of Pilot View, Clark county; J. R. Lisle, Short Street, Winchester and Manson Lisle, of Lexington, and one sister, Mrs. Nannie Lisle, of Dallas, Texas. No funeral arrangements have been made.

THE WINCHESTER SUN TUE. SEPT., 23, 1930

 

LISLE RITES TO BE ON THURSDAY

Services To Be Held At Grave: Winchester Cemetery

Funeral Services for J. H. Lisle who died at his home on the Boonesboro road, Tuesday afternoon, will be held at the grave in the Winchester Cemetery Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock, rev. Charles M. Neal officiating.

Pall bearers will be: Claybourne Lisle, Harvey Lisle, Marcus Lisle, J. H. Lisle, Jr. Ewell Lisle, and Arthur May. Honorary: Jesse Hodgkin, John M. Hodgkin, W. W. Haggard, C. C. Quisenberry, H. C. Butler and Jasper McDonald.

THE WINCHESTER SUN WED., SEPT., 24, 1930

Lisle, James L. Lexington – Mr. James L. Lisle, formerly of Lexington but living now in Carbonateville, Col., is back on a brief visit to his family and friends. He is much pleased with the west   and says the Kentuckians out there are prospering.

Clark County Democrat   Wednesday, March 17, 1880

Lisle, James Lee JAMES LEE LISLE

Funeral services for James Lee Lisle, 60 years old, formerly a resident of Lexington who died at his home in Versailles Friday afternoon will be held at the residence this afternoon at 3 o’clock. The Rev. Carlyle Lynch of the Versailles Presbyterian Church will conduct the services. The Versailles chapter of Masons will attend the funeral in a body. Pallbearers will be G. C. Williams, James McConnell, E. W. Byars, William Stevenson, G. Nat Petitt, Dr. Samuel H. Halley, D. M. Williams and June Hunter.

He is survived by his widow, a son, Rufus Lisle, of Fayette County and a daughter Miss Lillian Lisle, of Versailles; his mother, Mrs. Rufus M. Lisle, three sisters, Misses Virginia Lisle, Nancy Lisle and Mrs. Nathaniel Petitt, of Lexington and a brother, H. Halley Lisle, of Elmondorf, N. M.

THE LEXINGTON HERALD, DEC. 3, 1916

Lisle, James Thomas JAMES LISLE, 14, DEATH’S VICTIM

Son of Mr. and Mrs. Ben Lisle Succumbs At Home Near Elkin Station.

James Thomas Lisle, 14 year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Ben Lisle, died at 7:30 o’clock. The lad had been ill for several months.

He is survived by his parents, one sister, Kathleen, and two brothers, Winston and Howard, and numerous other relatives in this county.

The funeral services will be held at two o’clock, Thursday afternoon at the Providence Baptist Church, conducted by the Rev. Downey, assisted by Rev. O. B. Crockett. Burial will follow in the Winchester Cemetery. Pall-bearers will be his four uncles, C. W. Lisle, Harvey T. Lisle, Marcus Lisle and John Lisle.

THE WINCHESTER SUN WEDNESDAY AUG. 15, 1928

Lisle, James Thomas JAMES LISLE, 14, DEATH’S VICTIM

Son of Mr. and Mrs. Ben Lisle Succumbs At Home Near Elkin Station.

James Thomas Lisle, 14 year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Ben Lisle, died at 7:30 o’clock. The lad had been ill for several months.

He is survived by his parents, one sister, Kathleen, and two brothers, Winston and Howard, and numerous other relatives in this county.

The funeral services will be held at two o’clock, Thursday afternoon at the Providence Baptist Church, conducted by the Rev. Downey, assisted by Rev. O. B. Crockett. Burial will follow in the Winchester Cemetery. Pall-bearers will be his four uncles, C. W. Lisle, Harvey T. Lisle, Marcus Lisle and John Lisle.

THE WINCHESTER SUN WEDNESDAY AUG. 15, 1928

Lisle, James Thomas The Winchester Sun   Wed., 8-15-1928
Lisle, Jesse H. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 5-7-1955
Lisle, John The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-21, 10-22-1974
Lisle, John Brack The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-4, 5-5-1931
Lisle, John Brack Jr. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-4, 5-5-1931
Lisle, John Braxton DEATH OF BRAX LISLE

J. Braxton Lisle died suddenly Wednesday night at his home near Elkin, this county, of heart disease, aged seventy-three years. The remains will be buried in the Winchester cemetery this morning at eleven o’clock with services at the grave by Eld. J. W. Harding. He leaves a wife, formerly Miss Annie Jackson, one son, J. B. Jr., and two daughters, Mrs. Cole Mahone and Miss Mayme Lisle. Mrs. John McCord, of this city, is his sister.   He was an ex-confederate soldier and served under Morgan in the Civil War in Capt. Mullins’ company of Col. Chenault’s regiment. He was a kind hearted man who leaves a host of friends to mourn his death.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT     FRIDAY 9-16-1910

 

BURIAL OF A VETERAN

The body if John Braxton Lisle, who died suddenly of heart disease Wednesday night at his home near Elkin, was brought to this city for burial Friday morning. Circuit Court which was in session was adjourned by Judge Benton to enable a number of friends to attend the funeral and a large crowd was present. The funeral services were conducted by Elder J. W. Harding. The following were pall bearers: J. B. Carroll, W. D. Clark, Ed Fox, R. D. Hunter, Jesse Hodgkin and J. S. Mullins.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT   TUESDAY   9-20-1910

Lisle, John E. Will Book 1, Page 180

Dated: April 20, 1868

Recorded: April 27, 1868

Lisle, John E. John E. Lisle vs. George Isom

The death of the plaintiff herein, John E. Lisle, being suggested it is ordered that this action be revived in the name of his executors, Robert E. Bush and John M. Chorn ?.

Order Book 13; P. 247; May Court 1868

Lisle, John E. Gordon C. Mullins administrator vs. Gordon C. Mullins heirs

It is ordered that the order of reference to the master in the cause entered at the May Term 1873 be set aside – The marriage of Loraine Mullins to David N. Gordon is suggested, The marriage of Sarah Mullins to James Haggard is suggested, The Marriage of Nancy Mullins to Almanzo Ecton is suggested, the marriage of Mildred Mullins to Milton Lawrence is suggested – and the said David N. Gordon, James Haggard, Almanzo Ecton and Milton Laurence are ordered to be and are hereby made parties defendants to this action – The death of John E. Lisle one of the defendants to said action is suggested and by consent this cause is ordered to be revived against Robert E. Bush and John McCord executors of said John E. Lisle decd. are ordered to be and are hereby made parties defendants herein.

George B. Nelson is appointed guardians for the infant defendants – Colby Mullins and Alice Mullins.   All Parties present it is ordered that   the case be referred to the Master Commissioner to ascertain the debts due by the decedent Gordon C. Mullins and whom they are owing and the amounts of assets in the hands of the administrators liable for the payment of said debts, cause is continued.

Order Book 16; P. 300 – 301; May Court 1876

Lisle, John E. John E. Lisle executor vs. Clayburn Lisle

Defendant filed answer…action continued.

Order Book 14; P. 353; November Court 1871

 

John E. Lisle executor vs. Claiborne Lisle

Plaintiff to recover $1456.06 from defendant with interest subject to a credit….

Order Book 14; P. 471; November Court 1872

Lisle, John Riffe The Winchester Sun   Sat., 10-17-1942
Lisle, John Sr. The residence of John Lisle, Sr., near Elkin, caught fire Tuesday afternoon and was entirely consumed, together with much of the contents. Loss about, $2,500 insured in Poynter’s agency for $1,500. Mr. Lisle will rebuild at once.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, July 26, 1893

 

DEATH OF JOHN LISLE, SR.

Mr. John Lisle, Sr., died Friday afternoon at his home near Elkin, of pneumonia and heart trouble, aged seventy-three years. The remains were interred Sunday afternoon in the Winchester cemetery, services at the grave being conducted by Rev. B. B. Bailey, under the auspices of the Confederate Veteran Association.

He leaves a wife, formerly Miss Catherine Eubank, one son, Rufus Lisle, of the Winchester Bank, and three daughters, Mrs. Jas. E. Rutledge, of this city, and Misses Gippie and Fannie Lisle, of Elkin. Of a large family of brothers and sisters, only two survive, Mr. Clairborne Lisle and Mrs. Amanda Ecton. The deceased was one of our best men; a man of truth and integrity, a good husband, father and citizen.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT, TUESDAY, DEC. 3, 1901

 

—The burial of John Lisle, Sr., took place in the Winchester Cemetery, Sunday, at one o’clock P.M. Services at the grave were conducted by Elder B. B. Bailey. Mr. Lisle was 73 years of age and leaves a wife who was a Eubank and four children; Miss Gippie and Miss Fannie, Mrs. Nannie Rutledge and Rufus, also his brother Claiborne, aged 81, and a sister, Mrs. Amanda Ecton, aged 86. He entered the Confederate army from Louisiana, but came back here soon after the war. The home place where he lived has been continually in the Lisle family for more than 80 years. He was a highly honored citizen.

THE WINCHESTER SENTINEL, WEDNESDAY, DEC. 4, 1901

Lisle, Joseph Lewis Lisle Infant Dies

Funeral services for Joseph Lewis Lisle, infant son of Mrs. Anna Francis Lisle, will be held Tuesday afternoon at 1 o’clock at Colerane Mortuary. The child died Sunday morning at the Guerrant Clinic.   Rev. H. E. Baker and Rev. T. D. Johnson will officiate at the service.

Survivors include his grandmothers, Mrs. Willie Mae Murray and Ethel Lisle; three sisters, Betty Jane Claiborne, Paulette Glover, Jacqueline Mitchell, and one brother, Stephen Lisle. Interment will be in the family cemetery at Howard’s Creek.

THE WINCHESTER SUN. MON. 3/10/1958

Lisle, Julia Copher The Winchester Sun   Fri., 4-5-1957
Lisle, Leon H. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 3-8, 3-9-1968
Lisle, Lewis BROUGHT HERE FOR BURIAL

At his home near Summer, Missouri, Thursday Lewis Lisle was hauling a load of potatoes, when he accidentally fell from the wagon and the wheels ran over him inflicting injuries from which he shortly died. The remains were brought here and buried in the old Lisle graveyard near Elkin under the auspices of the Masonic Fraternity of which he was a member.   He was about Forty-four years old and unmarried. He was raised near Elkin, but went to Missouri when a young man and had been fairly successful in a financial way. His mother, Mrs. Nancy J. Lisle, a number of brothers and sisters, and a large circle of relatives and friends live in this county. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Richard French.

The Winchester   Democrat Tuesday 10-16-1906

Lisle, Manson Four Mile Items-Last week Jas. A. Bybee, James Hodgkin and D. J. Pendleton, as commissioners, divided the lands of the late Manson Lisle, dec’d, each heir receiving about 25 acres a piece.

Clark County Democrat     Wed., 5-26-1880

Lisle, Manson W. F. Elkin vs. Manson Lisle

Defendants counsel suggest the death of Manson Lisle the defendant and it is ordered that this action be continued for reviver.

Order Book 13; P. 560; November Court 1869

 

Nancy Muir administrator vs. Manson Lisle

The death of defendant Lisle was suggested and this action is continued for reviver.

Order Book 13; P. 570; November Court 1869

Lisle, Manson John E. Lisle administrator vs. George Ison

The court being advised of the death of Manson Lisle, money to be recovered from defendant.

Order Book 14; P. 22; May Court 1870

 

Manson Lisle administrator vs. Claiborne Lisle

Commissioners appointed to value the real and personal estate of the infants Achilles, John R., William J., Nancy J. and Philip M. Lisle infants and make report…..

Order Book 14; P. 65; May Court 1870

 

Manson Lisle Administrator vs. Mansion Lisle heirs

Sales of Lands of Mansion Lisle decd. ….. Payment made to A. J. Tribble as administrator of Manson Lisle…..

Order Book 14; P. 72; May Court 1870

 

Lisle, Ecton vs. Lisle and company

Ordered that T. S. Tucker master commissioner convey on behalf of the infant children of Manson Lisle decd., John R. Lisle, William J. Lisle, Andrew J. Lisle, Nannie J. Lisle and Phillip M. Lisle their interest in the lands of their father Manson Lisle decd. that is such lands as he inherited from his father James Lisle decd. to the other heirs of James Lisle, Amanda Ecton, John Lisle, Rufus Lisle, Claiborne Lisle in accordance with the agreement for the petition of the lands of James Lisle Decd…..

Cause continued.

Order Book 14; P. 328; November Court 1871

 

D. L. Cass vs. Manson Lisle administrator

Ordered action continued.

Order Book 14; P. 354; November Court 1871

 

Manson Lisle Administrator vs. Mansion Lisle heirs

Deeds approved.

Order Book 14; P. 405; May Court 1872

Lisle, Manson Phillip MANSON PHILLIP LISLE

Manson Phillip Lisle, 72, died at his residence, 413 Columbia Avenue, at 10:30 o’clock Saturday morning after a protracted illness. He was the son of Manson and Martha Ann Lisle. Survivors include two daughters, Mrs. Hester Lisle Beckley and Mrs. Leon Greenson, Lexington; one son Ewell M. Lisle, Richmond, Va; one sister, Mrs. Shelah Patten, Edinburgh Tex.; one brother, John R. Lisle, Winchester, and two grandchildren Jamie Lou Lisle, Richmond, Va and Shirley Ann Greenson, Lexington. Mr. Lisle was a member of the Calvary Baptist Church.

Funeral Services will be held at 10 o’clock Monday morning at the W. R. Milward Chapel, Rev. T. C. Ecton, officiating.

Active pallbearers will be E. J. Lisle, Ernest M. Lisle, Johnny Lisle, N. H. Bogie, SR., F. W. Bogie, and W. M. Bogie. Honorary pallbearers will be F. L. Snyder, Edward Lawrence, Garnett Kemper, O. M. Flynn, Frank P. Drake and C. Gran Graham.

THE LEXINGTON LEADER JULY 5, 1936

 

MANSON PHILLIP LISLE

Funeral services for Manson Philip Lisle, 72 years old, who died at his residence, 413 Columbia Avenue, at 10:30 o’clock Saturday morning after a protracted illness, will be held at the W. R. Milward Mortuary Chapel at 10 o’clock this morning, the Rev. T. C. Ecton, pastor of Calvary Baptist Church, officiating.   Interment will be in the Lexington cemetery.

Active pallbearers will be E. J. Lisle, Ernest M. Lisle, Johnny Lisle, N. H. Bogie, F. W. Bogie and W. M. Bogie. Honorary pallbearers will be F. L. Snyder, Edward Lawrence, Garnett Kemper, O. M. Flynn, Frank P. Drake and C. Gran Graham.

THE LEXINGTON HERALD JULY 6, 1936

Lisle, Marcus C. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 5-15-1971
Lisle, Marcus Claiborne

1890 – 1892

Lisle, Judge Marcus Claiborne          WEDDINGS

Cards are out for the marriage of Mr. Marcus Claiborne Lisle and Miss Elizabeth Buckner Bean, at the Presbyterian Church, Winchester, KY April 27, at 8 P.M.

THE LEX. MORNING TRANSCRIPT APRIL 24, 1887 P. 1 COL. 6

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT           6-4-1890

 

Marcus C. Lisle left Thursday for Colorado Springs, Col., where he will spend the summer for the benefit of his health. His many friends here hope it will be completely restored by his sojourn in the Centennial State.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT           8-27-1890

 

M. C. Lisle returned from Colorado Springs Friday much improved in health.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT             9-3-1890

 

M. C. LISLE on Monday assumed the duties of County Judge, secceeding Judge L. H. Jones, Judge Lisle, is an urbane, courteous young gentleman, well versed in the law and with a mound of sterling integrity who will do his whole duty without fear or favor.   Judge Jones retires from the bench with the consciousness of having performed the ardous duties of the office without regard to person of place, but with an eye solely to the good of the people.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, September 3, 1890.

 

M. C. Lisle on Monday assumed the duties of County Judge, succeeding Judge L. H Jones. Judge Lisle is an urbane, courteous young gentleman, well versed in the law and withal a man of sterling integrity who will do his whole duty without fear or favor.   Judge Jones retires from the bench with the consciousness of having performed the arduous duties of the office without regard to person or place, but with an eye solely to the good of the people.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT             10-1-1890

 

Last week, B. F. French, the leader of one of the factions of the Perry county prisoners now confined in jail here, in common with a number of others on both sides made a number of others on both sides, made application for bail before County Judge Lisle. The Judge refused the application of Mr. French and several others on the ground that the Perry Circuit Court had already refused bail and he therefore had no jurisdiction. On Wednesday Judge Benton, as counsel for French, got out another writ of habeas corpus, and Judge Lisle being absent, it was tried before Squire Bloom as the nearest magistrate to the Courthouse. The ground of application was that the prisoner was suffering from pulmonary and heart disease and that longer confinement would permanently injure his health and probably cause death. Those facts were substantiated by the testimony of two physicians, and Squire Bloom admitted him to bail in the sum of ten thousand dollars, which was readily given, two Perry county men becoming bondsmen. Mr. French has rented a house on Maple street and will reside here.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT   WEDNESDAY 10-1-1890

 

JUDGE M. C. Lisle has again found it necessary to leave the county on account of his health.   He left last week for Colorado where he will spend the winter. Sq. Bloom will probably act as Judge during his absence.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT               10-22-1890

 

Judge M. C. Lisle, who came to Colorado Springs last spring from Kentucky for the benefit of his health, has concluded to remain permanently in Colorado and will reside at Denver. He is a gentleman of Marked ability as an orator and a lawyer. Chairman Arbuckle should invite the Judge to make a few speeches during the present campaign.—Denver Daily News.

We doubt not that the Centennial State would gladly rob us of so gifted a citizen, but we are glad to hear that his health is improving rapidly and we hope he may soon be able to come back to us permanently. He is a true son of Kentucky and if his health will permit, will never live elsewhere.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, October 22, 1890

 

JUDGE MARCUS LISLE this week married his first couple, Lewis Woodford and Miss Kate Custard, of color. The Judge was highly complimented by the large crowd present for the delicate yet solemn manner in which the ceremony was performed.

Judge Marcus Lisle is a young and brilliant lawyer who already stands high and who has only been prevented by persistent ill health from achieving still greater fame. The confidence of our people is shown by his election as County Judge, one of the youngest that ever adorned the bench.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT           1-21-1891

 

JUDGE LISLE disposed of a full docket in the Quarterly Court this week. It was the Judge’s first term of Quarterly Court as he was not here at the October term.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT         3-11-1891

 

Judge M. C. Lisle and County Attorney E. S Jouett, were in Louisville Friday attending to the interests of Clark County in the K. U. Railway cases before the Federal Court.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT         4-15-1891

 

There are two children, a boy, aged 11 years, and a girl, aged 9 years, named respectively Marion and Etta Bowman, at the county poorhouse. The law makes it the duty of the County court to inquire after and put such orphans in apprenticeship. I am informed that these are bright, intelligent children, of respectable parentage. I will receive applications from proper persons who will do a good part for these orphan children for their services. M. C. Lisle, County Judge

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT   Wednesday 5-13-1891

 

QUARTERLY Court is in session, Judge Lisle presiding. About forty cases on the docket. One of the most prominent is that of D. A. Mockabee against the K. U. Railroad for breach of contract in not building the bridge over the road on North Main Street. Those who have to travel over that bridge and the road close to it will heartily wish that he might secure heavy damages.

On Thursday, was tried before Judge Lisle perhaps the largest case of forcible detainer ever tried in the county. It was between C. T Gamboe and W. W. Power and involved possession of 100 acres of land. This land had been sold by Squire W. N West, as agent for Mr. Gamboe to Mr. Power at $48 per acre. Mr. Gamboe claimed the payments were not arranged in accordance with his instructions and repudiated the sale. Mr. Power had rented the land last year and was thus in possession and the suit was brought to oust him. It was decided in favor of Mr. Gamboe, but Mr. Power declares his intention of carrying it to the court of last resort, if necessary.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT             6-17-1891

 

CITY, COUNTY, and   STATE

Judge M. C. Lisle yesterday began the erection of a handsome residence on South Maple street.

THE DEMOCRAT   WEDNESDAY JUNE 17, 1891

 

A petition was presented to Judge Lisle Monday numerously signed by residents of Ford asking for a voting precinct at that point. The city is quite a place, considerably larger than Winchester in point of acre, being in fact a mile wide and two miles long. The population varies with the activity of the mills, but is never less than several hundred. The present voting place is several miles distant and as very few of the voters possess horses or vehicles they must walk. Even if they go by rail to Elkin it involves a considerable walk. A voting place has been needed there for a long time and we feel sure that Judge Lisle will grant this petition.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT     11-25-1891

 

JUDGE M. C. Lisle yesterday began the erection of a handsome residence on South Maple Street.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT             1-27-1892

 

In referring to Judge Lisle’s candidacy, the Clay City Chronicle says: It will remember that Judge Lisle made a hard fight not long since for the place made vacant by the death of Congressman Wick Kendall, and came within a few votes of securing the coveted prize. His campaign at that time under the circumstances was one of the greatest ever made in the district, and although he went down in defeat he did so gracefully, and arose from the wreck with his coat off and his sleeves rolled up at work for the nominee. The manner in which the Democracy of his home county stands by him fully demonstrates the fact that he is in every way worthy the confidence of the people and the party, and that he would make an excellent Congressman goes without saying”.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT   JUNE 1, 1892

 

JUDGE M. C. Lisle, Monday, ordered an election for March 5th to take the sense of the voters of school district No. 54, in which the town of Ford is located, on the question of establishing a graded free school at that point. The proposition will carry by a handsome majority, and by next fall we hope to see Ford with one of the best schools in this section of the State.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT           8-3-1892

 

JUDGE LISLE has appointed Jas. H. Evans, Tom Hughes and J. N Conkwright to lay off the county into Magisterial districts according to the new Constitution. The number of districts must be not less than three nor more than eight. As all voters in the city must be registered, the Magisterial districts of the city can not as now, embraces a portion of the surrounding country, but must be confined to the city limits. The committee must report in twenty days.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT         8-10-1892

 

ANNOUNCEMENTS

For Congress

LISLE, We are authorized to announce the name of Marcus C. Lisle, of Clark County, as a candidate for congress in the Tenth Congressional District, subject to the actions of the Democratic party.

THE DEMOCRAT   WEDNESDAY AUGUST 24, 1892

 

In another column will be found the announcement of Judge Marcus C. Lisle, of Clark County, as a candidate for the democratic nomination for Congress in this district.   In presenting his claims to the Democrats of Lee, Judge Lisle argues that he comes from a county, which has shown more dispositions to cultivate friendly relations with our people than any other county in the district. It will be remembered that Clark County freely subscribed $100,000 to the L.C. & V. Railroad several years ago, and that one of the conditions of said subscription was that the road was to run to Beattyville or Proctor. Failing to secure this road Clark County then subscribed and paid $100,000 to the K. U., which has been an immense benefit to Lee county. Clark County has 24 miles of Kentucky river front, and is certainly as much interested in improving the Kentucky river as any other county in the district, and she is the only county presenting a candidate which is directly interested in the Kentucky river.   Clark County has not had an office, either State or National, for about half a century and has not been greedy in asking for political favor. Judge Lisle contracts with this the record of Montgomery county, which has had in the last ten years a U. S. Senator, two terms in the Lower House of Congress, a Chief Justice of the Court of Appeals, two Associate Justices of the Superior Court, Circuit Judge and Commonwealth’s Attorney, and she is now asking for both Democratic and Republican candidates for Judge of the Court of Appeals, for Congress and for State Examiner of Banks. The Democrats ought to study these facts and make up their minds in accordance with their best interests and with a spirit of fairness to the various aspirants. – – Beattyville Enterprise.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT         8-31-1892

 

JUDGE LISLE was thrown from a horse in Breathitt county Thursday, and wrenched his heel in some manner causing excruciating pain.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT       9-7-1892

 

– -Judge Marcus C. Lisle, of Winchester, was nominated by the Democrats at Estill Springs yesterday for Congress from the district on the 63rd ballot, receiving 32 and a fraction votes, one and a fraction more than necessary to nominate. On his return home last night the citizens of Winchester gave him a grand celebration. Judge Lisle is an elegant gentleman and has made many friends in this city and county within the last year. He came in 11 votes of beating Joe Kendall for the nomination last spring in this county when every person predicted that he would be beaten 2 to 1,   MT. Sterling Journal

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT       9-7-1892

 

THE IRVINE CONVENTION.- – JUDGE M. C. LISLE NOMINATED ON THE 63RD BALLOT.

The Democratic Convention to nominate a candidate for Congress from the Tenth district met Wednesday at Irvine, each of the sixteen counties being represented by delegates.

The convention was called to order by Chairman Vansant, who called John P. Salyer to the chair as temporary chairman. G. W Birch, Fred Broadhurst, J. W Lilly and W. McCary were chosen temporary secretaries.   Senator Hannah, of Elliott county, was unanimously elected as permanent secretary, with J. W Lilly, of Stanton, assistant.

Resolutions approving the call for the convention, reaffirming fealty to Democratic principles, endorsing Cleveland’s administration, and of sympathy for the death of J. W. Kendall were passed unanimously.

The Committee on Credentials reported in favor of seating the Bowles fifteen votes from Pike, Johnson, Martin and Floyd; Sublett got eleven from Knott, Morgan and Magoffin; Brooks had eighteen and one-half from Elliott, Menifee, Montgomery, Wolfe, Powell, and one and one-half from Estill; Lisle had seventeen from Clark, Lee, Breathitt, and one and one-half from Estill.

This continued without material change until the fifty-seventh ballot, when Sublett’s name was withdrawn. At the conclusion of the fiftieth ballot a resolution was adopted to drop the Hindmost candidate after the sixtieth ballot. At this stage of the proceedings both Lisle and Bowles were ahead of Brooks, and latter was dropped.

By the skillful manipulation of a few votes Taylor Young caused a dead lock between Lisle and Bowles, and buy the interpolation of dilatory motions prevented a decisive ballot, although the convention did not adjourn Thursday night until 4 A.M. Friday morning, a futile attempt was made to put Brooks on the truck again, but the scheme failed and Lisle was nominated on the sixty-third ballot, receiving thirty-two and a fraction, while Bowles received twenty-nine and a fraction.

Speeches were made by Lisle, Bowles and Brooks, accepting the situation, and one of the hardest fought, best managed, and at the same time most harmonious conventions ever held was adjourned.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT         9-14-1892

 

–The nomination of Marcus C. Lisle, of Winchester, for Congress is a very strong one, and at once removes the remotest possibility of a Republican Congressman from this district. Judge Lisle will not only receive the full Democratic vote, but he will have a very large personal following.- – Clay City Chronicle.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT       9-14-1892

 

– -Judge Lisle of Clark County, after a warm contest, has received the nomination for Congress in the Tenth District. This is a fitting recognition of the talents and character of the energetic, enthusiastic young Democrat. He has the ability and the acquirements to fit him for the position, and he will make a useful member of Congress and one who will devote his time and talents to the service of his constituents. He is deserving of the honor conferred upon him and it gives us pleasure to record the fact that the people of his district appreciate him and propose to reward him as he deserves.- Danville Dem.

With this issue we hoist the name of Hon. M. C. Lisle, of Clark County, as the Democratic candidate for Congress in this district, and appeal to the party to accord him allegiance.   We have from time to time acquainted our readers with his abilities, and it is now needless to expatiate on his excellence. He is a gentleman thoroughly qualified for the position, in touch with the people of the district, and who will reflect credit upon his constituents as their representative in Congress. Let all good Democrats – and there be no other kind in old Ky.- now go to work for a rousing majority for Marcus in the 8th day of November, and never let up until the evening of that day.- Hazel Green Herald.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT       9-21-1892

 

Misses’ Marion and Nancy Lisle, of Lex., are the guests of their cousin, Judge M. C. Lisle.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT       9-21-1892

 

WE ACCEPT THE CHALLENGE

We congratulate Clark County on the success of her candidate for the Democratic nomination for Congress. He is a splendidly equipped man and we will be more than glad to support him. Some twenty days ago when in our city he made a speech to the boys at ratification meeting in which he challenged Montgomery to give as large a majority for Hazelrigg as Clark will do. We now challenge Clark County to give Hazelrigg as large a majority as Montgomery will give Lisle. Democrats of Clark, we serve notice on you that you will have to stir yourselves, for Lisle’s majority in Montgomery is going to be a big one.- – Mt. Sterling Advocate

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT         9-28-1892

 

Judge Lisle left Saturday for the upper part of the district to press his campaign for Congress.   During his absence Sq. S. H. Oden will officiate as County Judge.

If any man thinks he can beat Marcus C. Lisle for Congress in this district let him undeceive himself. That gentleman will be our next Congressman so sure as the people get _to vote on the question. – -Pikeville Monitor.

COL., O. C. BOWLES spent Monday night in the city, en route home. He told us that he would give all the time to the campaign that he can possibly spare from his business. – – Paintsville Courier.

All of Judge Lisle’s late opponents have entered into the campaign with warmth that bodes well for his success.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT         10-5-1892

 

JOE KENDALL, who beat Judge Lisle for the congressional nomination, and for whom Mr. Lisle and his friends in Clark County piled up the biggest vote of any county in the district, shows his appreciation by entering heartily into the canvass in Mr. Lisle’s behalf. Mr. Kendall is booked for several speeches, which will do much good.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT         10-12-1892

 

JUDGE MARCUS C. LISLE is making a gallant canvass for Congress. He is constantly on the move and, if we are not mistaken, he will bring out the old time “hard cider” Democratic vote in every county.   The little sectional disturbances are fast fading out, and the Democrats everywhere in the district are shouting “Hurrah, for Lisle!”- – Mt. Sterling Sentinel Democrat

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT       10-12-1892

 

JUDGE M. C. LISLE is making speeches in Johnson County this week, and is meeting with an enthusiastic reception wherever he speaks. His majority will be the largest ever given in this district.

JUDGE LISLE is making a vigorous campaign, and expects to receive the largest majority ever given a Democrat in this district. He deserves it, and will most certainly receive it. – – Clay City Chronicle

JUDGE MARCUS C. LISLE, Judge C. W. Goodpaster and C. W. Nesbitt, in the order named, addressed a fair-sized audience, Monday at Frenchburg. Turner Spencer, a People’s party speaker, also made an address. There was plenty of enthusiasm manifested for the Democratic ticket. – – Owingsville Outlook

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT         10-26-1892

 

MARCUS LISLE is spending all his time in the mountains and is leaving Clark county to his friends.   Let us show our approval of his confidence by giving him a rousing majority.

JUDGE LISLE spent last week in the Sandy Valley.   Everything is all right and Democratic clubs have been formed in nearly all the country precincts.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT         11-2-1892

 

WE APPRECIATE IT.

Brethren of Clark County, you did well for Hazelrigg and you have our profound thanks. But in this county we gave Lisle 1,515 votes – eleven more than we gave Grover Cleveland. Thos. old “Kendall men” worked as hard for Lisle as they worked “forminst” him in the Lisle-Kendall primary. Montgomery Democracy is loyal and they never supported a more worthy gentleman or better Democrat than Marcus Lisle. – Mt. Sterling Sentinel-Democrat

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT         11-2-1892

 

Gibson Taylor, of Winchester, came up Wednesday evening. He is one of Judge Lisle’s trusted lieutenants and never sleeps on duty…Levi Geff, W. D. Huls and W. F Prewitt have been camping at the mouth of Quicksand during the past week fishing and gunning. – -Jackson Hustler.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT          11-16-1892

 

M. C. LISLE, M. C. gowine or comin’ it’s just the same, any way you take him, and our people will have reason to be as proud of their Congressman as they have been of their candidate.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT         11-30-1892

 

WINCHESTER is now the Mecca to which the eyes and feet also of hundreds of would-be office holders under the administration, are turned, and Judge Lisle’s office is the shrine of their adoration. They come to him from all parts of this district, and many others who want to strengthen their claim, “deaden over the line” from other parts to secure his endorsement. This is one of the penalties of greatness which must be endured with what grace is possible. No doubt Judge Lisle knows whom he will endorse at the proper time, but at present he is politely non-committal. As an instance of the number of offices to which his attention is directed, the sixteen counties of this Congressional district have from 6 to 44 post offices in each, or a total of 287. For these there will be from one to a dozen applicants, some of whom will pour their claims into his tired ear a score or more times. In addition to this will be applications for storekeepers, gaugers, etc., in the Internal Revenue service. In view of the jealousies and heart burnings that must naturally ensue from his inability to provide places for all these applicants, we smaller fry may find some consolation when we reflect that in all probability we shall never be Congressmen.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT           12-7-1892

Lisle, Marcus Claiborne

1893

CITY, COUNTY, AND STATE

Elsewhere WILL BE FOUND THE CARD OD Judge M. C. Lisle announcing his candidacy for Congress.   In this connection the Clay City Chronicle says: “Judge Lisle is one of the most popular and deserving men in Eastern Kentucky, an able lawyer, an upright citizen and a gentleman in all that the name implies.   If the Democracy should select him for its candidate his election is a foregone conclusion. While we are not advised as to who may be before the convention and have no desire to forestall public opinion, our personal knowledge of Judge Lisle is such as to satisfy us that the party will make no mistake should he be selected as the standard bearer.”

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT   FRIDAY 3-11-1893

 

TO THE VOTERS OF THE TENTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT

The sudden striking down at his post of duty of the lamented Mr. Kendall, will render it necessary for the Democrats of this Congressional District to hold at a very early day, a convention to nominate a candidate at the special election to fill the vacancy. It is not yet known when nor where this convention will be held, but the time will necessarily be short and it will be impossible for any candidate to see all the people. I take this method of announcing my candidacy to you. Clark county has always been content to render her valiant service to whomsoever her sister counties might put forward for this great office. Only once has she had aspirant, and he did not succeed to the nomination. Her people feel that after these years of fidelity to the chosen sons of other counties they have some claims which the Democracy of the district will recognize.

Situated as we are at the very gateway to all the district, there is not one county in all the sisterhood, in the development of which we are not deeply and vitally interested, and I promise, if elected to this great position, that I will waste no opportunity which offers to develop and build up this magnificent domain of counties.

The great work so ably, faithfully and industriously undertaken by the dead Congressman ought to fall in to hands that will earnestly carry it forward to its legitimate completion. The beautiful symmetry of his work ought to be preserved to the end. No local prejudices ought to be allowed to mar any of the undertakings which he had put forward in behalf of any person of community. I promise that if elected I will earnestly labor to finish his work, not to spoil it.

As to my democracy and faithfulness to my party I refer you to the people of my own county who have honored me with the most important county office in their gift by probably the largest majority ever given in the county. I have stood in the midst of every political fray since I became a voter, and have unfalteringly offered battle to every enemy of Democracy and the people. I have never failed to heed the cry of Democratic distress whether it came from my own people or from those doing desperate battle with the enemy elsewhere. If elected I will serve the people faithfully, honestly and industriously.   I will give them all my time, and the appeal of the humblest dweller in all this district will not go unheeded.

M. C. Lisle

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT   FRIDAY 3-11-1893

 

DIED

Friday, the infant son of Judge M. C. Lisle died and was buried beside the body of its mother, who preceded it nut a few days.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT   WEDNESDAY 3-23-1893

 

Representative Lisle arranged today to have a private interview with the President the latter part of this week, when he will tell Mr. Cleveland all about the boys in the Tenth Kentucky district and present their claims for consideration. Mr. Lisle has indorsed Mr. Robert Riddell, of Irving for the Collectorship of the Richmond district. Mr. Lisle says there are several gentlemen in his district after the Collectorship, but that as Mr. Riddell jumped into the ring first and he indorsed him he would like to see him get the appointment. Another constituent Mr. Lisle is working for day and night is C. R. Hill of Beattyville, who wants to be Chief of the Miscellaneous Division, Treasury Department. Mr. Hill is strongly indorsed.—Washington Cor. Courier Journal

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, April 12, 1893

 

The following shows that Congressman Lisle is hustling for the Post offices in the Tenth Congressional District: Inez, Martin county, Jeff Newbury: Paintsville, Johnson county, Green Meek; Flat Gap, Johnson county, S. W. Walters; Prestonsburg, Floyd county, Mrs.. Belle Cassady; Coal River, Pike county, R. C. Huffman. As these appointments are recommended by Congressman Lisle, they will be made by Fourth Assistant Postmaster General Maxwell.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, April 12, 1893

 

Judge Lisle seems to be doing what he can for the boys in the trenches as the following from the Washington correspondent of the Courier-Journal would indicate: “Representative Lisle is hustling these days for his constituents. He saw Postmaster General Bissell and Attorney General Olney today and urged upon them the claims of C. R. Brooks, of Mt. Sterling, who is an applicant for the position of Attorney-General for the Postoffice Department. The Postmaster General and the Attorney General gave Mr. Lisle a patient hearing, but did not intimate what action they would take. Mr. Lisle filed at the Postoffice Department this afternoon a batch of recommendations for fourth-class postmasters. He expects them to bear fruit within the next few days. He also filed the application of Judge Riddell, of Irvine, who wants the Richmond Collectorship.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, April 12, 1893

 

Judge Lisle has endorsed Sid Maple for postmaster of Stanton. The selection is a good one, and many friends and relatives of Mr. Maple in Clark will rejoice at his good fortune.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, May 3, 1893

 

A new Postoffice called Lisle in honor of Congressman Lisle has been established at Hainimes’s store near the Levee in Montgomery county.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, May 10, 1893

 

Robert Riddle, of Irvine, is a candidate for the Collectorship of the Richmond district. He is backed by Representative Lisle and as Richmond has ten or twelve candidates hustling for the Collectorship , the probabilities are this juicy plum will fall to some other section of the district, and the section most likely to capture it is the Mountain district. It is this phase of the contest that increases the chances of Riddle. Representative Lisle says his district has never had the Collectorship and it’s about time that it be recognized. He is putting in some good work for Riddle and he believes fortune will favor him.—Washington Cor. Courier Journal

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, May 10, 1893

 

The Washington correspondent of the Covington Commonwealth don’t believe that Judge Lisle can land Judge Riddell a winner in the race for the Richmond Collectorship: “This revenue district contains two Congressional districts and two Democratic Congressmen, Marcus C. Lisle and Gov. McCreary. Lisle is urging the appointment of Judge Riddell, while McCreary hasn’t settled which of the twenty-two applicants he will recommend. There are seven applicants from Mr. McCreary’s own county, Madison, but as that county has had both the Collectorship and Congressman for many terms, the department has decided to give the other counties in the district a chance. McCreary’s seniority in point of service will undoubtedly give him precedence over Lisle, and there is no doubt but that McCreary will name the man and that it will be decided in a few days. As a further ‘tip’ upon this office, the Commonwealth has it straight from the President that a lawyer ought to fill the Eight District Collectorship.”

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, May 17, 1893

 

The change in the postoffice came sooner than was expected by many in view of the oft-repeated assertions that the present incumbent would not be molested unless under exceptional circumstances. Others however, knowing Mr. Hampton’s intense and aggressive Republicanism, were not surprised to hear that he had been supplanted by D. C. Lisle, whose eventual appointment has been a foregone conclusion from the beginning. In this case one good man is succeeded by another. While it is impossible to please everybody, Mr. Hampton has come as near doing so as probably any man could have done. He has been uniformly courteous, obliging and polite. The financial management has been good and the officials of the department have always rated the Winchester office as one of the best kept establishments in the service. Walker Hampton his chief assistant, probably understates the details of the office as well as it is possible for any man, and has always taken great pride in the promptness and efficiency of the service. His political opinions have never been obtrusive, and few would know that his political views inclined to Republicanism. He is very popular and the determination of Mr. Lisle to retain him meets with general approval. In fact it will be absolutely necessary to have some one who is acquainted with the details of the business, in order to prevent confusion and dissatisfaction.

Mr. Lisle is peculiarly well fitted for the office inasmuch as he knows nearly every patron of the office already together with the members of the various families. He is very popular, has an unlimited supply of patience and will take a pardonable pride in seeing that the office stands in the front rank in regard to efficiency. He will take charge about June 1st as his bond must be forwarded and approved and other legal formalities gone through with.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, May 24, 1893

 

Sid Maple was Friday appointed Postmaster at Clay City in accordance with Judge Lisle’s recommendations Congressman Paynter’s man for the Sharpsburg office also got there. The latter, Mr. Baker, is the father-in-law of J. Clyde Nelson, formerly of this county and now editor of The World.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, May 24, 1893

 

Representative Lisle is feeling pretty good, thank you. He has at last secured the scalp of Postmaster Hampton, of Winchester, notwithstanding that Hampton sent the Postmaster General a protest against being removed. The Representative from the Tenth District has obtained an appointment for Ben D. Delaney, of Winchester, in the Treasury Department. Delaney is a newsboy, and for a number of years served Representative Lisle with the Courier-Journal. Delaney will enter upon his duties as Messenger in the department tomorrow.—Washington Cor. Courier-Journal

The Winchester Democrat,   Wednesday, May 24, 1893

 

The ousting of the Postmaster at Winchester, Ky., before the expiration of his term, to make room for Congressman Lisle’s brother, gives hope to the friends hereabouts of Napoleon Carlisle and Justus Hetsch. Congressman Lisle filed charges against Harrison’s old appointee, and Mr. Cleveland sustained them. It is certainly tip enough to show that Mr. Cleveland is likely to sustain all of the charges made by Colonel Berry in the local cases. The change of Postmasters at Midway, Ky., is also on the same basic.—Covington Post.

It is due to Postmaster Hampton to say that the charges mentioned are simply political and in no way affect his character as a man or his management of the office.

The Winchester Democrat,   Wednesday, May 24, 1893

 

The change in the post office came sooner than was expected by many in view of the oft repeated assertions that the present incumbent would not be molested unless under exceptional circumstances. Others, however, knowing Mr. Hampton’s intense and aggressive Republicanism, were not surprised to hear that he had been supplanted by D. C. Lisle, whose eventual appointment has been a foregone conclusion from the beginning.   In this case one good man is succeeded by another. While it is impossible to please everybody, Mr. Hampton has come as near doing so as probably any man could have done. He has been uniformly courteous, obliging and polite. The financial management has been good and the officials of the department have always rated the Winchester office as one of the best kept establishments in the service. Walker Hampton, his chief assistant, probably understands the details of the office as well as it is possible for any man, and has always taken great pride in the promptness and efficiency of the service. His political opinions have never been obtrusive, and a few would know that his political views inclined to Republicanism. He is very popular and the determination of Mr. Lisle to retain him meets with general approval. In fact it will be absolutely necessary to have some one who is acquainted with the details of the business, in order to prevent confusion and dissatisfaction.

Mr. Lisle is peculiarly well fitted for the office inasmuch as he knows nearly patron of the office already, together with members of the various families. He is very popular, has an unlimited supply of patience, and will take a pardonable pride in seeing that the office stands in the front rank in regard to efficiency. He will take charge about June 1st, as his bond must be forwarded and approved and other legal formalities gone through with.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT   WEDNESDAY 5-24-1893

 

Sid Mapel was Friday appointed Postmaster at Clay City in accordance with Judge Lisle’s recommendation.   Congressman Paynter’s man for the Sharpsburg office, also got there. The latter, Mr. Barker, is the father-in-law of J. Clyde Nelson, formerly of this county and now editor of The World.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT   WEDNESDAY 5-24-1893

 

Judge Lisle got his work Wednesday at the post office department and secured the following postmasters: J. D. Stamper, Fincastle, Lee county; H. A. Williams, Flat Gap, Johnson county; John L. Brown, Jeffersonville, Montgomery county; Mrs. Mary Cottle, Sandy Hook, Elliott county; Letcher Snowden, St. Heleus, Lee county; J. C. Flannery, French, Elliott county; J. A. Adams, Zachariah, Lee county, and T. S. Tolin, West Bend, Powell county. The latter was a Clark county man.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, May 31, 1893

 

“The Post office Department people are very slow in making removals of fourth –class postmasters,” remarked Congressman Lisle this evening. “There are over fifty of my recommendations on file in the department, and they have been there for several weeks. I call upon the officials the importance of early action, but it seems that unless charges are filed no attention will be given them except in cases where a vacancy exists by reason of a resignation. The people in Kentucky ought to know the condition of affairs and not hold us responsible for keeping Republicans in charge of the post offices.”—Washington Cor. Courier Journal

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, June 7, 1893

 

The remains of Jefferson Davis were brought from their home in Mississippi and interred Thursday in the Richmond, Va., cemetery. Twenty-five thousand people viewed the bier as it lay in state, and it is said that seventy-five thousand were in the city. More Confederate troops were in line than ever before at one time since the war. Everywhere the emblems of mourning showed how much the great leader was loved by his people and how dear is his memory yet. Congressman Lisle was present and sent the following telegram to Capt. D. J. Pendleton, which well illustrates the feeling that prevailed: “Richmond has been retaken: the old Chieftain is again in command.”

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, June 7, 1893

 

The following Pension Examining Boards have been appointed on the recommendation of Representative Lisle: Mt. Sterling Board—Drs. W. R. Thompson, N. F. Pierce and J. A. Shirley. Irvine Board—Drs. W. J. Groves, Embry and Stayner.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, June 14, 1893

 

Judge Lisle returned Friday afternoon from Washington for a little much needed rest. From what the resident correspondents at Washington say, Judge Lisle has been the hardest worker for his constituents of the whole Kentucky delegation. He has certainly tried as hard as any man could to secure the positions to which the “boys in the trenches” are entitled by virtue of the verdict of November. He says Judge Rees is holding his department down like a veteran and that Ben Delaney is making a model messenger.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, June 14, 1893

 

Representative Lisle was at the Interior Department this afternoon and had an interview with Secretary Smith in the interest of Mr. C. B. Hill, of Beattyville. Mr. Hill desires   to be appointed a member of the Board of Pension Appeals. He is strongly indorsed and Mr. Lisle is working hard to secure the appointment. There is a vacancy on the board caused by the reduction of Mr. Langley of Fostenburg, to the classified service. Mr. Langley was reduced at his own request just before the Administration came into power. A Kentuckian is entitled to the appointment and as Mr. Hill is the most prominent applicant the chances are he will get the appointment. Langley played the ostrich game but it won’t work, and he will probably have to walk the plank before the dog days come.—Washington Cor. Courier Journal

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, June 14, 1893

 

Representative Lisle was at the Interior Department Wednesday and saw Assistant Secretary Reynolds in the interest of C. B. Hill, of Beattyville. Mr. Hill is an applicant for appointment on the Board of Pensions Appeals. Kentucky had a place on the Board during the last Administration in the person of John W. Langley, of Prestonsburg, and just before the change of Administration Langley had himself transferred from the Board and put in the classified services, and he is still drawing $1,000 from Uncle Sam. Assistant Secretary Reynolds talked very encouragingly, and told Mr. Lisle that he would carefully consider Mr. Hill’s claims. The only other Kentucky man who is an applicant for the same position is Mr. Reppert, of Rockcastle. It is understood that Mr. Reppert is being pressed for the place by Governor McCreary. It is believed Kentucky will get the place on the Board. Tomorrow Representative Lisle will call at the White House by appointment and see the President in behalf of Judge C. R. Brooks, of Mt. Sterling, who wants a Judgeship and W. O. Mize, of Hazel Green, who is an applicant for the Surveyorship at Louisville. In the case of Judge Brooks, Mr. Lisle has the President’s promise of something good. It may be Judge Brooks will get one of the Judgeships in Oklahoma.—Washington Cor. Courier-Journal

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, July 12, 1893

 

From a private source we learn that Hon. M. C. Lisle has answered some seven thousand letters from constituents. Truly, the life of a Congressman is anything but a bed of roses.—Hazel Green Herald

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, July 26, 1893

 

Judge M. C. Lisle, of Winchester and his mother-in-law Mrs. Bean and Master Bean Lisle passed to Cincinnati Thursday in the interest of the latter’s health, he is suffering from rupture. The handsome little fellow, who looks much like his late and lovely mother, seems otherwise in good health.—Paris Kentuckian

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, July 26, 1893

 

CITY, COUNTY, STATE

Hon. M. C. Lisle scored another point in the appointment of George B. Gardner, of Salyersville, as law clerk.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT   WEDNESDAY 8-16-1893

 

The Courier Journal of Wednesday says; “Representative Lisle was at the White House and waited half an hour to see the President for the purpose of obtaining an audience for Mr. W. O. Maize, of Hazel Green, who wants to be Surveyor of the Port at Louisville, but as this was Cabinet day. Mr. Lisle failed to see the President. He will make another attempt tomorrow. Speaking of bills which he will introduce, Mr. Lisle said; “There are two measures which my people are deeply interested in and I hope to secure favorable action on them this session. One of my bills is to establish a Federal Court at Jackson, in Breathitt county. This is very important to our people. Nearly all the moonshining is done in my district and the cases are all tried in Louisville at a considerable expense to the government. By establishing a Federal court at Jackson it would save the government considerable money in the matter of mileage of witnesses. The other bill I want to see go through provides for public building at Mt. Sterling. My predecessor Mr. Kendall introduced the bill into the last Congress and I think it was favorably reported on by the Committee. The government business at Mt. Sterling warrants a public building, and it won’t be my fault if I fail to get an appropriation for it in this Congress.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, August 16, 1893

 

Hon. M. C. Lisle scored another point in the appointment of George B. Gardner, of Salyersville, as Law Clerk.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, August 16, 1893

 

Judge Lisle is pushing the claims of C. C. Peters, of Mt. Sterling, who has applied for the position of Foreman General of Public Buildings. As Mr. Peters is the only Kentuckian who has applied for the position, his chances are thought to be good.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, August 23, 1893

 

In the make up of the Congressional committees, Judge Lisle was by his request assigned to the committee on Arid Lands and also a place on the committee on Pensions

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, August 23, 1893

 

In speaking of measures he would push, Congressman Lisle said he was deeply interested in the   establishment of a Federal court at Jackson, Breathitt county, and the erection of a public building at Mt. Sterling. If Mr. Lisle will secure those good and badly needed things for his district he will have accomplished much good.—Hazel Green Herald

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, August 23, 1893

 

It is hard to tell what man will make a good member of Congress until he is tried, as nine out of ten prove dismal failures; but if there is anything in present indications. Congressman M. C. Lisle of the Tenth Kentucky district, is going to make a first-class member of the House. He is active and earnest in the discharge of his duties and constantly at work.—Courier Journal

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, August 23, 1893

 

Mr. W. O. Mize, of Hazel Green, who is after the Surveyorship, was at the Treasury Thursday with Representative Lisle trying to learn something about the appointment. Mr. Mize is hopeful, and says he will stay here until the office is disposed of.—Washington Cor. Courier Journal

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, August 23, 1893

 

Representative Lisle to-day called at the interior Department and saw the Commissioner of the General Land Office in behalf of Judge J. W. Lilly, of Clay City. Judge Lilly wants to be appointed Chief of a Division in the Land Office and the member from the tenth district is making a strong fight for the Judge, who is indorsed by nearly every member of the Kentucky delegation. As Kentucky has not reached any great amount of patronage in the Land Office the Clay City gentleman ought to stand a pretty good show of landing on both feet.—Washington Cor. Courier-Journal

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, September 13, 1893

 

Judge M. C. Lisle has introduced fifty bills at the present session of Congress.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, September 13, 1893

 

Among the sketches of Kentucky Congressmen given by an exchange we find the following concerning Judge Lisle, “M. C. Lisle, M. C. is the name of the youngest member of the Kentucky delegation and he comes within a month or two of being the youngest man in the House. He is a handsome specimen of the thoroughbred Kentuckian and he represents one of the most interesting districts in the United States. His own county is in the blue grass region but the other counties are up in the mountains. When he stumped his district last fall he had to do it on horseback and he wound in and out among the mountains for weeks without seeing a railroad train or a hotel.

Three-quarters of his constituents cannot read or write and Andrew Jackson gets more votes among them than in any other district in the United States.

Judge Lisle is uncertain how they are going to take his votes against free silver, but he is willing to run his chances and is ready for them.

“You see,” he says, “I feel something like my old friend, Bill Sokerby. Bill is one of the characters in my district and he was riding up on the mountain one time when his stock of whisky ran low. He heard of a still a few miles up the mountain and he struck out for it at double quick.

“Sure enough, he discovered a fine article and filling a couple of jugs he hung them across his saddle and started out again. He hadn’t gone very far before one of the jugs was nearly empty and the balance between the two having been lost they fell down over the horse’s neck. The animal started into a frightened run and Bill, by that time was in such a condition that he was flat on his back in the road, with the horse miles away on the road and the jugs smashed by the wayside.

“Bill slept where he lay for an hour or two, and when he began to wake up he saw a big copperhead snake coiled up in front of him and wickedly darting out his tongue.”

He sat up in a hurry and began to rub his eyes. Then catching sight of the broken jugs near by, he recalled his condition.

“He looked the snake in the eye with perfect coolness.

“Go ahead——you” he shouted, “You can’t frighten me, I couldn’t have been better prepared for you if you’d given me six months’ notice”

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, September 20, 1893

 

Hon. M. C. Lisle returned from Washington Wednesday and will remain some time. He thinks the Senate will reach a vote on the Silver question early in October, and that it will be in accord with the action of the House.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, September 20, 1893

 

The appointment of a new postmaster for Mt. Sterling will probably be made this week. When the appointment is made and the office turned over, every office of the presidential class in Representative Lisle’s district will have a Democratic postmaster. The Congressman from the Tenth district, besides being a gentleman and a scholar, is a hustler of the first-class.—Courier Journal

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, October 4, 1893

 

Representative Lisle’s Brother, Judge Lisle, the brilliant young Congressman from the mountain district of Kentucky, has a brother as bright as he who is a prosperous farmer at home, says the New York Recorder. The farmer brother strolled into the village store in Winchester a few days ago, and the local wits began to quiz him by asking what he was busying himself about. “Oh,” he replied good naturedly “just cutting a little corn and raising a few pigs.”

“Just think of it,” remarked the store keeper teasingly,” what a difference there is between members of the same family. Here you are, just a plain ordinary farmer living alone here raising a few pigs and cutting a little corn and there’s your brother, Marcus up in Washington, one of the three hundred statesmen who are framing the laws for sixty million people. Now what do you suppose Marcus is doing up there while you are loafing around here in Winchester?”

“Oh, “ replied the farmer, with a drawl, “I reckon he’s roaming around like he always did, asking everybody what’s it all about.”

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, October 11, 1893

 

Mr. Lucien Beckner, of Winchester, came over to go to Louisville with the football team. He goes to Washington pretty soon to take a place as private secretary to Congressman Lisle at a salary of $1,200 per annum.—Danville Advocate

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, October 25, 1893

 

Representative Lisle had a talk with Chairman Blanchard, of the Rivers and Harbors Committee, Friday and urged that the Committee visit the Three Forks of the Kentucky River at Beattyville for the purpose of investigating the work that has been done on the lock and dam at that place. Mr. Lisle says if the Committee will consent to go he is satisfied they will come back favorably impressed with the importance of making a liberal appropriation for the continuance of the improvement. Representative Berry and in fact every member of the delegation have united in the request that the Committee on Rivers and Harbors visit Beattyville. The citizens of that town will give the Committee a warm welcome should they accept their invitation. Congress has already spent $325,000 on this work, and the engineer in charge reports that with a liberal appropriation this year the work can be completed in two working seasons.—Courier Journal

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, November 8, 1893

 

Judge M. C. Lisle is at home, resting up from the labors of the extra session of Congress.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, November 8, 1893

 

Judge Lisle, Gov. McCreary and others of the Kentucky delegation have succeeded for the first time in the history of the country in having the River and Harbor Committee to pay a visit to this portion of the country. Chairman Blanchard and eight others of the Committee with a number of others interested, went as far as Beattyville and were much impressed with the possibilities of the upper Kentucky. The expenses of the trip were not paid from the Federal Treasury, but from the pockets of those interested, Congressman Lisle being one of the principal contributors. Capt. Dandridge did much to make the expedition a success, placing a special train at their service.

Judge Lisle thinks the result of this visit will be the improvement of the river, at least as far as Beattyville. This will probably be done by the contract system: that is the whole work will be let but the whole work will be let but the appropriation will be made annually and the work will be finished in eight or ten years.

This will be of vast importance to Clark county as she has about thirty miles of river front, and although we are well supplied with railroads, will give us competition by water, the cheapest of all methods of transportation. Preliminary work is now being done for Lock No. 7, at High Bridge. The next lock will be somewhere near the mouth of Boone’s Creek, in this county. This will give slack water navigation to Ford or perhaps above. If Mr. Lisle does nothing more for his district than this it will entitle him to the lasting gratitude of a very large portion of it. He is also working unceasingly for the good of his constituents in other places.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, November 15, 1893

 

Congress met in regular session Monday, Judge Lisle from this district was not present but will go this week. Lucien Beckner will accompany him as private Secretary.

The Winchester Democrat; Wednesday, December 6, 1893

 

A reporter of a New York paper has been interviewing Congressman upon their views concerning the proposed income tax. Judge Lisle expressed himself as follows: “I am inclined to favor a graduated income tax, but would prefer a tax on dividends and inheritances.

The Winchester Democrat; Wednesday, December 13, 1893

 

The Washington Correspondent of the Courier Journal of Saturday says:

“Representative Lisle called at the interior Department this afternoon and saw Secretary Hoke Smith about the Pension Agency for Kentucky, Mr. Lisle is anxious to see Maj. Matt Adams appointed. He says it would be the most popular appointment that could be made. There is no change in the situation. Col. Northup Representative Paynter’s candidate is still in the lead. The member from the Ninth district has made a strong fight for his man. He has managed his case with considerable skill and diplomacy, and furthermore he has done it single handed.”

The Winchester Democrat; Wednesday, December 20, 1893

 

This afternoon, Deputy Marshal Punch of Mt. Sterling, in company with Representative Lisle called on Commissioner Miller and filed an application for the position of Deputy Collector of Internal Revenue. Punch is well indorsed.—Courier Journal Washington Correspondence Wednesday.

The Winchester Democrat; Wednesday, December 27, 1893

 

Henry Godsey, of Washington D. C., writing to his father, says he is still acting as secretary to Congressman Lisle, and will continue to hold that place until he gets something better. Henry’s many friends here will be glad to hear this.—Hazel Green Herald

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday December 27, 1893

Lisle, Marcus Claiborne

1-1894 thru 7-10-1894

A letter from Washington, to the Mt. Sterling Advocate, has the following of Judge Lisle. “Mr. Lisle, our new member from the Tenth District, is not only becoming very popular, but he is gaining a reputation as a worker. He was sick all during the holidays; but as soon as Congress reconvened he was one of the first to be there. He is not in his A. B. C.’s by any means He is already gaining the reputation of being one of the brainiest men in the House. When he speaks his words are felt, and they count. Kentucky and the Tenth district should well feel proud of their election of Mr. Lisle, as their Representative.”

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, January 24, 1894

 

Representative Lisle introduced Wednesday a bill to dredge and deepen the channel of the Big Sandy. The bill appropriates $50,000. It was referred to the Committee on Rivers and Harbors.—Washington Cor. Courier Journal

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, February 21, 1894

 

Representative Lisle is kept pretty busy these days looking after pension claims of his constituents. Nearly every day he calls at the pension office and recommends a number of claims for special consideration.—Washington Cor. Courier Journal

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, February 21, 1894

 

THE Mt. Sterling Sentinel-Democrat has the following concerning Judge Lisle: “Judge Lisle has only served a part of a term in Congress, but by an intelligent and faithful discharge of every duty devolved on him has shown conclusively to the people of the district that they made no mistake in electing him to the exalted position he now holds. He claims that if the people of the district think his record as their Representative in Congress is a fair one for a new member, that he should be accorded the same favor that has been granted to other Congressmen from this district by giving him a renomination and election. Judge Lisle has been an indefatigable worker on behalf of the “boys in the trenches” and has been exceedingly successful in securing government positions for his friends. Only a few days ago we heard a prominent Democrat of this district say: “Judge Lisle has greatly strengthened himself in the district, because he always works to get the boys who do the work for the Democratic nominees positions in the government service.” Judge Lisle’s duties will detain him in Washington for some months, but we are satisfied the Democrats of the district will give his claim due considerations.”

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, March 16, 1894.

 

IN this issue we place the name of Hon. M. C. Lisle, of Clark, as a candidate for Congress among our announcements. Mr. Lisle comes before the public on his record and asks for an endorsement. He has been faithful to his constituents, filing his seat and recording his vote on all questions, when his physical condition demanded that he should be in bed. He has done his utmost to faithfully represent the want of his people, and a scanning of the list of votes before Congress will disclose that he has been on the right side of every question before that body. Mr. Lisle writes us that it will be impossible for him to leave his place in the House at present to make a personal canvass, but that he relies upon the fair-mindedness of his people to see that his interests, do not suffer while he is at his post of duty. Our sister county of Clark calls upon the people of Montgomery to stand by her candidate, as the day is not probably a distant one when Montgomery will be asking a like favor of her.-Mt. Sterling Advocates.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, March 23, 1894.

 

THE cut of Judge Lisle in Tuesday’s Courier-Journal would not be recognized as a likeness of that gentleman by those who have seen him since he turned out that beautiful crop of Congressional wiskers.-Beattyville Enterprise.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, March 27, 1894.

 

THE Kentucky Club, as headquarters for Kentuckians at the National Capital has been formed.   Concerning its formation the correspondent for the Courier-Journal says: “Congressman Lisle, with few exceptions the youngest man in the House, greatly assisted in the organization of the club due. When the President appointed Maj. Adams Pension Agent he had in view the wishes of Mr. Lisle as much as Judge Lindsay’s. In the hunt for patronage Lisle has been as modest as he was deserving, and whatever may be his faults Grover Cleveland may always be depended on to reward a man who adds modesty to other solid merits. Judge Lisle is very popular among all the leading people of the executive department and the Postoffice officials cleared his decks of Republican postoffice without delay. He also had the confidence of the pension office and his affairs in that immense concern are in good shape. The youthful member from the Tenth Kentucky district is one of the most genial men in the House and exceedingly popular with his associates. He is constant in his attendance and prompt in department and committee service. I was once a clerk of a congressional committee, and I know something about what I am talking about when I say that no man can be a successful Congressman who neglects his committee room. Lisle knows this and when he comes back here as a member of the next House he will be one of the members that the Speaker and committee chairmen will depend on. Perhaps he will be a chairman himself.”

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, March 27, 1894.

 

Representative Lisle has announced his candidacy for re-election. His friends are out in the field tightening up his fences and laying the ground work to secure a unanimous re-nomination. Judge Lisle as his friends call him, has caught on to the ropes, so to speak, remarkably well for a new member. He has been studious and plodding and without purpose to praise, but to tell the truth, he has made a record to be proud of, a record that does honor to his constituents. One piece of work that he had a hand in was the Goodnight Bill, dividing Kentucky into two judicial districts and providing for the holding of a Federal Court at Jackson, Breathitt county. This bill, as stated in the dispatches at the time, has been unanimously reported from the Judiciary Committee, and is now on the calendar.   Judge Lisle worked day and night on the bill, and gave great assistance to Mr. Goodnight, the author of the bill. The people of Jackson for several years have earnestly petitioned Congress to give them a Federal Court, but efforts to get such a bill reported were in vain until now. In the matter of pensions, Judge Lisle has been exceedingly active, hardly a day passing over his head without making a visit to the Pension Department in the interests of the old soldiers in his district. – Washington Cor. Courier-Journal.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, March 30, 1894

 

REPRESENTATIVE LISLE has received a great many letters from all over his district from permanent Democrats pledging their support for re nomination. Judge Lisle has not been feeling well for the past ten days, and although he has not been out of his room, he has managed to keep up with his correspondence and attend to all the wants of his constituents. He will attend the Democratic caucus Tuesday night and vote to approve the bill to repeal the per cent tax on State bans.   He is a warm advocate of this measure.   He says there will be some legislation on this subject before adjournment. Washington Corr. Courier-Journal.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, April 13, 1894.

 

A WASHINGTON Associated Press dispatch says Representative Lisle is very much improved, but still not well enough to leave his room. He has received a number of letters asking him to come home and enter the canvass. He would do so, but, as a number of local bills in which his district is deeply interested, are liable to come up at any time, he feels it his duty to remain here and look after them.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, April 13, 1894.

 

AMONG the bills that will be reported favorably by the Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds is the bill introduced by Representative Lisle, making an appropriation for a public building at Mt. Sterling. Col. Berry will write the report. Mr. Lisle has been most persistent in his efforts have finally been rewarded with success. Col. Berry says the Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds will shortly be given a day by the Committee on Rules and that among the bills he hopes to get through are the bills providing for public buildings at Newport and Mt. Sterling.   The Newport Public Building Bill is now on the calendar.-Washington Corr. Courier-Journal.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, April 17, 1894.

 

A CORRESONDENT writing from Washington to the Mt. Sterling Advocate has the following to say of Judge Lisle, “In speaking of the Kentucky members from observation and of the House as a whole, I am impelled to say of Hon. M. C. Lisle that of all the new members, he is classed as among the best versed men in the House.   He is a member, of now one of the most important House Committees and also a member of one other Committee.   The tenth Kentucky District should well feel proud of her representative, and next November should send him back to Congress with an overwhelming majority.”

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, April 17, 1894.

 

Judge Lisle is quite ill at Washington, although the reports of his illness have been greatly exaggerated by the daily papers. His brother, D. C. Lisle, went to Washington Tuesday night, and will return to-morrow. It is highly probably that   Judge Lisle will come home with him.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, May 4, 1894

 

Postmaster Lisle yesterday receiving a telegram from Judge Lisle noting a great and continued improvement in the latter’s health, and is assured of a speedy and permanent recovery. He will probably come home the latter part of the week, unless imperative business shall demand his stay in Washington.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, May 8, 1894

 

In speaking of Judge Lisle’s record the Mt. Sterling Advocate says: “This will be good news to the many friends of our Congressman, and we hope to see his genial face at a very early day, as he makes a active canvass among his constituents.”

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, May, 11, 1894

 

Judge M. C. Lisle arrived here last night greatly improved in health and quite sanguine as to the future.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, May, 11, 1894

 

Judge Lisle is rapidly recuperating from his recent illness and will soon be all right again.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, May 18, 1894

 

Judge Lisle Withdraws

When Judge Lisle came home from Washington some weeks ago he was a very sick man. The physician held out hopes of a speedy recovery, which prediction his legion of friends hoped to see verified; such was not the case, and his strength has been very slow to return. After weeks he has only been able to leave his room for a short time, and the least exertion exhausts him. He has not been able to visit a single county in the district other than his own, and from present indications would not have been able to do so before the primaries. Notwithstanding all this, his friends in the various parts of the district have been loyal and enthusiastic and those who have watched the progress of events have been confident that he could again win. Taking everything into consideration, however, Mr. Lisle has announced his withdrawal in the following card which explains itself:

Winchester, Ky.,

June 6, 1894

To the Democrats of the Tenth Congressional District:

Having become convinced that my candidacy for a renomination to Congress is seriously interfering with and retarding my recovery of health, it becomes my duty to my family and myself to withdraw from the contest. To the many loyal friends in each county who, both with and without solicitation, have pledged me their earnest and devoted sympathy and support. I desire to express my sincerest thanks. To the Democrats of my own county, who without any seeking upon my part, have without a dissenting voice, so far as I know, given me well nigh through three heated contests, their undivided and unanimous support, I bare and bow my head humbly. My life, whatever may be left of it, belongs to them.

Respectfully,

M. C. Lisle

The Sentinel-Democrat in commenting upon Judge Lisle’s withdrawal says: “It is indeed distressing to see such a brilliant, honorable and useful public career cut short by ill-health. It has been generally thought that if Judge Lisle had retained his health that he would have been renominated. We sincerely hope that he may some day take up where he left off and round out his public life, so ably and brilliantly begun.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, June 12, 1894

 

In compelling Marcus C. Lisle to decline entering into the Tenth district contest, ill health robs Kentucky of her rose and expectancy of the present delegation in Congress. In the forenoon flush of handsome manhood, genial yet studious, true as steel to his friends, but truer still to the greatest good to the greatest number, Judge Lisle gave promise of a long career of usefulness in the councils of the nation—a promise that has not been broken or withdrawn, but only suspended for a period of, let us hope, not longer than two years.—Louisville Times

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, June 12, 1894

 

For several days Judge Lisle has lingered on the verge of the grave and his death seemed but a question of a few hours. Tuesday he rallied somewhat, and for two or three days seemed a little better. Yesterday he grew worse again and as we went to press it was thought the end was very near.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, July 6, 1894

 

JUDGE LISLE this week received from the Sec. of State the official vote of the various counties comprising this district. The counties carried by Judge Lisle, and the majorities are Breathitt, 411; Clark, 372; Elliot, 627; Floyd, 540; Knott, 318; Montgomery, 468; Morgan, 452; Menefee, 230; Pike, 190; Powell, 108; and Wolfe, 268. Mr. Russell carried Estill, 163; Johnson, 555; Lee, 62; Martin, 235; and Magoffin 182. The total vote for Judge Lisle was 14, 515, and for Mr. Russell was 11,713. Lisle’s majority 2,772. On the same basis as here-before the district will have 73 votes in convention.   Clark still retains her supremacy with 10 votes, but her influence will hardly be so potent as here-before as several of the other counties have increased their representation.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT       JULY 9, 1894

 

HON. M.C. LISLE DEAD.

Clark County Mourns the Loss of Her Gifted Young Son.

The fact that “Death loves a shining mark” was never more fully exemplified than in the death of Judge Marcus Lisle, which occurred at his home on South Maple Street at five o’clock Saturday morning.

Young, gifted, ambitious, popular, it seemed that life had so much for him and for this reason it seems doubly hard for him to be cut off in the very spring time of his young manhood. Possessed of talents far above the average man: with a popularity which extended beyond the bounds of his own State with the Napoleonic power of organizing, directing and commanding men which so few possess in so marked a degree, there was no position in the gift of the people to which he might not confidently have aspired. The nation mourns for one of her most gifted young sons, but those who knew him best, mourn for him not as Judge Lisle, not as Congressman Lisle, but as Marcus Lisle, their Neighbor and friend, who was ever ready with hand or brain to serve them: who never forgot a friend or harbored malice against an enemy: who hated all that was low, mean and ignoble with the intensity of a noble and generous nature: who was always ready and glad to grasp the hand of the humblest neighbors of his boyhood days, and whom no elevation or power could render haughty or arrogant.

“Into each life some rain must fall” and bitter are these drops to his family. His father seemed bound up in the life of his gifted son, and to his old age comes this, the bitterest sorrow of his life.   His brothers and sisters mourn the loss of the youngest son, the joy and pride of the family, but it is to his bright little boy bereft at so tender an age of a mother’s loving care and a father’s guiding hand, that the tenderest sympathy goes out. May He who watches over the lambs of His flock guide and direct his little feet into the paths that shall make him worthy of his parentage.

The career of Marcus Lisle is an incentive to all aspiring young men. Born on a farm in the Four Mile Hills, September 22, 1862, his course was a model one from the start. At the country school he was one of the brightest and best boys of his class. He then attended the High School of this city and finished his education at Lexington. He then studied law graduating from Columbia Law School, New York. He at once entered upon the practice of law in this city, in which he was quite successful. With positive views on all subjects, he naturally drifted into politics and at once became a leader. He early developed a talent for newspaper work and while he was owner and editor of this paper it ranked as high as it ever did in its varied career.   In 1890 he was elected County Judge by a decided majority defeating a most estimable and popular gentleman.   Although the youngest judge the county ever had he administered its affairs in a wise and conservative manner.   While County Judge, he received numerous solicitations to make the race for Congress in the Tenth district.   He consented and in one of the most spirited contests ever known he was nominated by the Democrats of this district and elected by more than the usual majority over a popular Republican, Charlie Russell. His career in Congress has been singularly successful. Without making a single speech, he had more influence with the President and the heads of the various departments than any new member of the House and he was an especial favorite with the President.

His brief married life was a most happy one. In 1887 he was married to Miss Lizzie Buckner Bean, one of the brightest and sweetest of Clark’s fair daughters. For nearly six years their life was a dream of happiness, which was rudely dispelled by the death of Mrs. Lisle in March 1893. One child of this union survives, Ernest Claiborne, one of the prettiest and brightest little boys to be found in a day’s journey and who is now about five and one-half years old.

Early in life the seeds of hereditary consumption developed and only his indomitable will and courage enable him to do what he has done. He went to Colorado, that Mecca of consumptives, and for a while his condition improved and he bade fair to live a long time, but the love of home was too strong and declaring that he would rather die in Ky. than live in Colorado, he returned. By sheer will power he performed his congressional duties and had not his health failed utterly there is no reasonable doubt that he would have been returned to Congress again. Human nature, however, has its limit, and when he came home a few weeks ago, his most intimate friends knew it was to die. His strength gradually grew less and without pain he died. His last days were peaceful and he met death with the same tranquil courage that has all his life distinguished him.

He gave the same thoughtful consideration to religious subjects that he did to others and in 1892; he united with the Presbyterian Church, of which he had since been a consistent member.

He was the youngest son of Claiborne and Esther Hampton Lisle, the latter having died several years ago. Three brothers, Squire Jas. D. Lisle, Postmaster D.C. Lisle and Thos. Lisle, of Elkin, and two sisters, Mrs. Henry Oliver, of Arlen and Mrs. Jesse Hodgkin, of Elkin, survive him, while two sisters, Mrs. Jas. Duckworth and Mrs. Jeff Eubank preceded him to the grave.

The funeral was arranged for ten o’clock Monday morning but was deferred more than an hour to await the arrival of the congressional delegation. Long before the beginning of the services, the Presbyterian Church was filled to its utmost capacity and hundreds were unable to obtain admission.

Rev. J.J. Chisholm preached the funeral sermon from the text “Where Is My God that Giveth Songs by Night.” He spoke feelingly of life and its duties and afflictions, of God who was able and willing to lighten the night of grief and sorrow by the songs of gladness or resignation.

The prayer offered by Rev. W.S. Keene was most fervent and eloquent while the music rendered by the choir was beautiful and appropriate. A solo by Mrs. Fanniebelle Sutherland, of Paris, was especially sweet.

The floral decorations were most beautiful and appropriate.

In accordance with a proclamation issued by Mayor Garner, the business houses were closed, and a feeling of subdued sadness was prevalent every where. The bell of the church and also of the engine house tolled at half-minute intervals. The procession was one of the largest that ever entered the cemetery, nearly one hundred vehicles being in line. At the grave Rev. W.T. Bolling made a most feeling prayer, and a quartet from the Presbyterian choir sang an appropriate selection as the grave was being filled. The pallbearers were Col. H.P. Thomson, Hon. Jas. F. Winn, S.A. Jeffries, W.H. French, Eli Bean, T.C. Robinson, Waller Quisenberry, Thos. W.L. Vanmeter, F. P. Pendleton, of this city, and Capt. W.F. Dandridge, of Frankfort.   The honorary pall bearers were Sid Mapel, of Clay City: John Welch, of Nicholasville: F.A. Evons, Beattyville; Floyd Hagan, of Jackson: Lieut. Gov. M.C. Alford, of Lex.: N. H. Trimble, of Mt. Sterling; O. A. Lyle, of Stanton; Vernon L. Vaughn, of Irvine, and M. O. Cockrell, of Montgomery county.

The Congressional delegation present was Senator Wm. Lindsay. Congressmen A.H. Taylor and A.N. Martin of Indiana; Gov. McCreary, Hon. T.H. Paynter and Hon. Albert Berry of this State; Hon. W. V. Lucas, of South Dakota, and Hon. Wm. Draper, of Mass. They were accompanied by Clifton Rose, of the Washington Bureau of the Courier-Journal: Lucien Davidson and W.C. Parrish, pages, Albert and Robert Berry, sons of Hon. A. S. Berry. The delegation was in charge of Henry Noller, Assistant Sergeant of Arms of the House. W. H. Gregor, General Passenger Agent of the C&O road, was in charge of the train.

This delegation was met at Mt. Sterling by Mayor Garner and Judge Flanagan.

Among those present from a distance were: Hon. C. M. Clay, Jr., James McClure, of Paris: Judge D.B. Redwine of Jackson: S. B. Phelps, of White Hall: Green R. Kellar, of Carlisle: J.C. Bryant, of Ashland: C. B. Hill, of Beattyville: J. L. Lisle, Mrs. V. H. Lisle, Miss Nancy Lisle, Miss. Miriam Lisle, Thos. H. Shelby, Mrs. William Preston, and Mrs. Wickliffe Preston, of Lexington: Mrs. John Mason Brown and daughter, of Louisville.

The following account of the action of Congress we take from Sundays Courier-Journal:

“The death of Congressman Marcus C. Lisle was not unexpected, as he had been in a precarious condition for some weeks. It can be said to his credit that he never gave up until forced to do so by tired nature. Mr. Lisle was one of the most popular members of the House, and had he lived there is no doubt but that he would have made his mark in the legislation of the country, as he possed a peculiar fitness for the position to which his people elected him.

As Gov. McCreary received the dispatch from the deceased Congressman’s brother, announcing the death, he felt it a duty to inform the members of the delegation and to call a meeting for the purpose of taking appropriate action. This was done without delay. Gov. McCreary was elected as chairman, and instructed to prepare suitable resolutions to present to the House.

While the Ky. members were thus engaged, the House was proceeding to non-concur in the Senate amendments and to agree to the conference asked for by the Senate. It took nearly two hours to do this. When this had been done, the Governor arose and addressed the Chair. He said:

“Mr. Speaker, it is my sad duty to announce to the House of Rep. the death of Hon. Marcus C. Lisle, late a Rep. in Congress from the State of Ky. He died early this morning at his home, in Winchester, KY. He was born September 23, 1862, in Clark County, KY. Though young in years, he had become very prominent as lawyer, legislator and businessman.   In the year 1890, he was elected County Judge of the county in which he was born and reared. In 1892, he was elected as Rep. in Congress, and was, therefore, serving his first term at the time of his death. He was a true friend, a pure patriot and an accomplished gentleman, and he was loved and respected by all who knew him. In all the positions of honor and trust held by him he was conspicuous for his ability, integrity and fidelity to duty. At this time I will not indulge in any extended remarks on the life, character and public services of our deceased colleague and friend, but in the future I will ask the House of Representatives to set apart a day for the commemoration of his virtues and public services and for appropriate action in regard to his death. I now ask the adoption of these resolutions which I send to the desk.”

Resolved, That the members of the House of Representatives have heard with deep regret and profound sorrow of the death of the Hon. Marcus C. Lisle, late Rep. from the State of Ky.

Resolved, That a committee of seven members of the House be appointed by the Speaker to act with such Senators as may be selected to attend the funeral of the deceased, and that the Sergeant-at-Arms of the House shall take proper action for superintending the funeral and for attending the remains of the deceased at the place of burial, and the necessary expense incurred by the execution of this order shall be paid out of the contingen fund of the House.

Resolved: That the clerk be directed to communicate to the Senate a copy of these resolutions.

Resolved: That as a further mark of respect the House do now adjourn.

The resolutions were unanimously agreed to. Before announcing the vote the Speaker appointed the following committee in pursuance of the resolutions: Messrs. McCreary, Berry, Taylor, of Indiana: Paynter, Draper, Lucas and Martin, of Indiana. Mr. Pence was appointed in the place of Mr. Martin, but owing to some House engagements could not serve.

The Vice President appointed the following committee on the part of the Senate to attend the funeral of Congressman Lisle: Messrs. Blackburn, Lindsay, Palmer, Squire and Duboise. The funeral party will leave tomorrow afternoon in a special car over the Chesapeake and Ohio. They are due in Winchester 10:30 Monday morning, at which time the funeral will take place.

The members of the Kentucky delegation held a meeting at which Mr. McCreary presided and adopted the following:

“It having been announced that the Hon. Marcus C. Lisle, of Kentucky, had this day departed this life, a meeting of his colleagues were held in the Capitol, and the following resolutions were adopted:

Resolved. That the members of the Kentucky delegation join with the family and constituents of the Hon. Marcus C. Lisle in mourning his untimely death and desire to express their regard for him as a man and their respect for him as a representative of the people.”

Resolved. That in the death of the Hon. M. C. Lisle there is taken from the labors of business to the rewards of eternity a true man: a faithful public servant, one whose future was full of promise, one who had in a short life of but thirty-one years won the respect and confidence of the people among whom he lived: had attained the highest position within the gift of his district and commanded the admiration of his colleagues in the American Congress by his faithful, zealous and intelligent discharge of his representative duties.

Resolved. That a copy of these resolutions be furnished the family of the deceased.

“It was commented on today by the members as somewhat singular that of the three Democrats elected from the tenth district one should have been killed and the other two John M. Kendall and Marcus C. Lisle should each die while serving the first half of their first term. There seems to be a strange fatality around the members who come from the Tenth district.”

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, July 10, 1894

 

The Hon. Marcus C. Lisle, congressman from the Tenth Kentucky district, died at 5 o’clock yesterday morning at his home at Winchester. By his death Kentucky loses an upright representative and a true man. The deceased was a most estimable and lovable character and was justly popular wherever known. Resolutions of regret were adopted by the National House of Representatives and adjournment taken in honor of the dead. The Kentucky delegation held a meeting and also adopted resolutions of sympathy.—Edl. Courier-Journal Sunday

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, July 10, 1894

 

W. T. Ogden came home from Irvine yesterday to attend the funeral of Hon. M. C. Lisle.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, July 10, 1894

 

Among the Mt. Sterling people who attended the funeral of Hon. M. C. Lisle yesterday were: N. H. Trimble, Geo. C. Eastin, Geo. C. Everett, H. B. Kingsolving, Roy G. Kern, Henry Prewitt, C. W. Harris, M. O. Cockrell, H. R. Bright.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, July 10, 1894

Lisle, Marcus Claiborne

7-13-1894 thru 12-1894

Resolutions of Respect

At a meeting of the Winchester bar held in the County Court room, Saturday, July 7, 1894, to take appropriate action upon the death of Hon. M. C. Lisle, a member of the bar.   Col. Jos. T. Tucker was elected Chairman and Gibson Taylor Secretary.

Leeland Hathaway, Geo. B. Nelson, W. M. Beckner, Rodney Haggard, F. H. Dudley and C. S. French were appointed a committee to draft resolutions of respect and instructed to report at 8:30 o’clock Monday, July 9, 1894. The Committee reported the following resolutions which were adopted unanimously:

Resolved. That it is with the deepest pain and sorrow that we have learned of the death of the Hon. M. C. Lisle, member of this bar, who on the 7th day of July 1894, yielded up his young and useful life in obedience to the final summons.

Resolved. That his death has taken from the bar of Winchester one of its most valued members; one who in his intercourse with his brethren of the profession was always courteous, obliging and kindly, and in his duties to his clients was always faithful and true.

Resolved. That we tender to his bereaved family our sincere sympathy in this, their great loss.

Resolved. That a copy of these resolutions be spread upon the records of the Circuit and County Courts of Clark county and a copy thereof be sent to the family of the deceased

JOS. T. TUCKER, Chairman

GIBSON TAYLOR, Secretary.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, July 13, 1894.

 

D. C. Lisle has received requests in the last few days from several parts of the districts asking him to stand for the unexpired term of his brother. Marcus, and stating that this precedent had been established in the past. Mr. Lisle is thoroughly acquainted with the political affairs of the district, having been prominent in the management of his brother’s campaigns, and would make a good Congressman.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, July 13, 1894.

 

IN a great many minds the first question presenting itself after hearing of the death of Judge Lisle is, who will be his successor to fill the unexpired term? While the term is short, six or seven months, the $ 2,500 or $ 3,000 which will be due whoever is elected, is not to be scoffed at these hard times. It has been generally observed that a Congressman dying in office is succeeded by a relative or some one from the same section of the district in which the deceased resided, and in this case we know of no good reason why this custom should not be observed. The counties of this district should say to Clark county, select and nominate your choice and we will elect him. Outside of the family circle of Judge Lisle we know of no one more deserving or competent for this position than Judge W. M. Beckner, of Winchester. We have not heard what action, if any, the Campton convention took in this matter, and in all probability will not hear the result until after the Messenger is printed, but we believe it would be advisable for the convention now in session to endorse some one to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Judge Lisle, or rather let the delegates agree that Clark county furnish the candidate to be selected by the Democratic voters of the county.-Morgan County Messenger.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, July 17, 1894.

 

D.C. Lisle has conducted to be a candidate for the Democratic nomination to fill his brother’s unexpired term in Congress. This action has been taken after mature consideration and in response to numerous requests from various parts of the district and from among the best Democrats of the counties composing it. He is thoroughly conversant with the politics of the district, having been prominent in the various campaigns of his brother and being in touch with the prominent Democratic leaders everywhere. One of the most prominent factors in arriving at this conclusion was that it was the dying request of Marcus that Connie should succeed him.   If this should be the case, the latter could take up the Congressional work where it was left off by our dead Congressman, as he has been in full touch, with him in regard to all public affairs. If nominated he will add much strength to the ticket in this part of the district.   The formal announcement will appear in our next.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, July 17, 1894.

 

Resolutions Passed by the Kentucky Club at Washington.

At a meeting of the Board of Managers of the Kentucky Club, of Washington D. C. held July 11, 1894, the following preamble and resolutions were adopted:

WHEREAS, It has pleased God to terminate by death the physical sufferings, long borne with philosophical fortitude, of Hon. Marcus C. Lisle, last a member of the Kentucky Club, of Washington, D. C. therefore in token of our sorrow, as well as in testimony of our appreciation of his worth as a man, his great value as a public officer and on account of the high esteem and fraternal affection in which he was held by the members of this club.

Be it Resolved,   That we sincerely mourn his sad death, which came in the flower of his youth, just as he had, by his own merits, and by virtue of his great intelligence and innate manliness, reached a high station, attained by few so young. In this station he had already acquitted himself so worthily as to give evidence that the most distinguished career and highest civic honors would surely be his, if he might only live to attain them:

That in his untimely death the country has lost an able and incorruptible patriot and public servant, society an ornament, Kentucky one of the brightest and most promising of her sons, and this club one of its best beloved and most zealous and enthusiastic members:

That we extend to his bereaved family in this the hour of their sore affliction, our most earnest and heartfelt sympathy,

That copies of these resolutions be furnished for publication to The Winchester Democrat, Winchester Sun, the Louisville Courier-Journal and the Washignton Post, and that they be spread upon the minutes of the club.

A. C. Quisenberry, Sam M. Gainer, W. H. Anderson, Geo. B. Gardner, Committee.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday July 17, 1894

 

THE Democratic convention at Campton on Wednesday endorsed Hon. W. M. Beckner, of Clark county, as the proper person to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Hon. M. C. Lisle last Saturday. This, we think, was eminently right and roper, and we believe the Democrats all over the District will in turn endorse the action of the convention, though it is an open question as to their right to take any action in the matter.-Hazel Green Herald.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, July 17, 1894.

 

FROM the expressions found in our exchanges published in the 10th Congressional district and from all other information at hand we think the district is highly pleased with the action of the Campton Convention in endorsing Judge Beckner for the short term. He above all others, will be ready to step into the harness next December and knows how and what to do in the three months’ of service to which he will be called.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, July 17, 1894.

 

BEAUTIFUL TRIBUTE

Paid the Memory of Our Dead Congressman

In the Campton Convention by Jas. H. Swango.

MR. CHAIRMAN:-In support of the resolution just adopted and in behalf of the people of Wolfe County, I rise to any tribute, as one beginning the great journey of life, to our friend and fellow-citizen who has just ended it. While, in the active discharge of his duties the hand of disease was laid upon his manly form and threatened his entire usefulness; but day by day the glad tidings of continued convalescence were brought to us, when, like the lightning’s bolt from a cloudless sky, there came the brief appalling message-“Marcus Lisle is dead.” It smote our hearts like ice. We stood with bowed heads in the presence of great sorrow, and to day we get to consecrate this hour to the commemoration of him who has closed his eyes to the scenes of this world to be opened amid the great realities of a blest eternity.   Loving hands have gently laid him away in his last, long resting place; loving eyes have looked for the last time through blinding tears upon his still cold faced and the last sound of the funeral dirge has long since died away. But how vain are these formalities to the conquering hero who gave his life for his county’s cause. Naught on earth will disturb the sleep that wrapped the mantle of death about this mouldering form. Would that I could relate the story of his life. Born o f poor but honorable parentage, he rose rapidly in his profession and in the brightest morning of manhood he gained the confidence of his fellow man wherever he was known. His fathers pitched their tents in Kentucky’s lonely forest when she was indeed the dark and bloody ground. They watched by the cradle of the infant commonwealth beset with danger on every hand. They wrested mountain fastness and bluegrass fields from savage foes, founded a religion that feared nothing save God and established a civilization that never closed a door to a stranger. Their sacred dust lies mingled with our soil made doubly sacred by the best blood of their hearts. Such was the ancestry of our deceased and honorable servant. Fellow citizens let bow our head in gratitude to

God that such a patriot dwelt among us. Let our mountain sides resound with his praise. Let us manhood, our beautiful and virtuous womanhood swell the great chorus in singing songs to the memory of him who like the man of Galilee, gave his life for his fellowman. As an humble citizen of the commonwealth, let me dedicate to his memory this epitaph, so beautifully inscribed by another. And let I be enshrined in the hearts of every true American present as a stimulant to his honesty, his integrity, his fidelity to the great principles of American citizenship. In remembrance of Marcus C. Lisle. Born Sept. 23, 1862. Died July 7th, 1894. A learned and faithful lawyer, peaceful and public spirited citizen, an incorruptible patriot, a sagacious statesman, and over all-God’s noblest handiwork-an honest man, he was an ornament to the commonwealth and an honor to is race. Peace be to his ashes and God bless his memory.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, July 17, 1894.

 

OFFICERS

Of the Democratic Primary election, Aug 6, 1894.

THE Democratic County Committee met yesterday afternoon for the purpose of appointing election officers and the transaction of other business. S. J. Shinfessel who had been selected as member from Goodes declined to accept and W. F. Clemons was chosen as the member from that voting place.

A mass meeting at the Court house Saturday, August 11th, at two o’clock was ordered, to choose between W. M. Beckner and D. C. Lisle as to which should be considered the choice of the county for the unexpired term of Hon. M. C. Lisle in Congress.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, July 24, 1894.

 

The withdrawal of Mr. D. C. Lisle assures Judge W. M. Beckner the Democratic nomination for the unexpired Congressional term of the late Marcus C. Lisle, and it is not probable that even a Republican candidate will be put up to contest his election. Judge Beckner has been for years the most earnest and efficient advocate of the betterment of the public school system of Kentucky; he has served on the Prison and the Railroad Commissions, in the Constitutional Convention and the legislature, and will take his seat in Congress next December admirably equipped for service in that wider field of public service.—Louisville Times.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, July 31, 1894

 

In another column will be found the advertisement of Gov. Brown fixing the time for holding the election to choose a successor to Hon. M. C. Lisle. The time is fixed for the regular November election. This is as it should be. We believe Judge Beckner will add strength to the ticket especially in this district, while “Little Joe” Kendall will whoop up the boys in the Licking and Sandy valleys.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, August 3, 1894

 

Hon. Jas. F. Winn has been appointed administrator of Hon. M. C. Lisle.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, August 3, 1894

 

An Incident in the Life of the Late M. C. Lisle

Col. S. M. Boone, who was for years a resident of this city, prints the following incident in last week’s issue of his paper, The Marion Falcon:

“The death of this brilliant and sprightly young Kentuckian, late a member in Congress representing the Tenth District recalls an incident in his life which should be preserved in the archives of his State. He was a lawyer of fine ability, had been elected County Judge of Clark and then to Congress of the United States. In all these responsible relations his career was that of a fearless and strictly upright man, loved and respected by all who knew him.

“At the time of the occurrence to which reference is made the writer was residing in Winchester, and one fine morning passing along Main street, he met a bright-looking little country boy with a basket of eggs on his arm. The question was asked of the little fellow if his eggs were for sale and the price: he said they were and that they were worth 12 ½ cents per dozen. To which I replied: “You are asking too much for your eggs, my boy; I can buy them here in any of the stores for 10 cents”

“Well, Sir,” said he, “this you may do, but my mother told me to sell these eggs for 12 ½ cents per dozen, and I propose to do so, or carry them back home to my mother, as her hens cannot afford to lay eggs for you town people for ten cents a dozen.”

“He was a stranger then to me, but the manner in which he spoke and the sparkle in his honest, bright eye made an impression upon me that I shall never forget. I said: “I’ll take your eggs, my little man, and did so, carrying them into the house, at the same time remarking to my wife: ‘Mollie the little boy standing at the door is waiting for his chance to make his mark in the world.’ That little boy was Marcus C. Lisle. What impressed me most was his loyalty and devotion to his mother; she whom he loved had given him his marching orders, and by them he proposed to stand, or carry the eggs back home to mother.”

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, August 7, 1894

 

There will be a meeting of the Democratic Executive Committee for the 10th Congressional District of Kentucky, held at the National Hotel, in the city of Mt. Sterling, on the 25th day of August, 1894, at 11 o’clock a. m., to take action with reference to the nomination of a Democratic candidate to fill the vacancy in the present Congress, caused by the death of Hon. M. C. Lisle. Notion is given that if there is, by that time, no candidate   for the nomination other than Judge W. M. Beckner, of Clark, it will be in order then to declare him the nominee. The members of said Committee may take such action as they deem proper to ascertain the wishes of the Democrats of their respective counties with reference to this matter. Given under my hand, as Chairman of said Committee, this August 8th 1894.

R. H. Vansant, Chairman,

Dem. Com. 10th district.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, August 14, 1894

 

Mrs. Henry L. Godsey, of Washington City, is visiting relatives in the county. She is the wife of H. L. Godsey, who was private Secretary to the late Hon. M. C. Lisle.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, August 17, 1894

 

A Tribute

The incidence so well related by Col. S. M. Boone, in the life of Marcus Lisle makes me glad that the noble mother of the faithful son has not been forgotten. “Childhood days now pass forgotten.” “Forms and scenes of long ago crowd memory’s walls,” and one of the most vivid pictures is the form and face of Easter Hampton Lisle. Life had not been what she expected it, but upon the faithful features there were few lines of deep trouble. Not a murmur ever passed the thin, white lips; she scarcely paused to send a regret into the grave of the past. She loved her children and the example and words of encouragement always brought them nearer to her side. And when thirty-three years ago, a dear boy was laid in the weary arms, perhaps she dreamed of the success she did not live to see. She was never impatient and the course events took were only the fulfilling of the divine plan. Who knows the hopes that lived when she saw the success attendant upon his youth. She passed away before she could behold the battles he fought and won upon this earth. Noble   quiet woman! We can almost hear the words of welcome, and the first question asked when heaven’s home was reached, “Where’s Mother?”

Fannie F. Stryker     Windsor, Mo.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, September 4, 1894

 

THE mountains stood by Marcus Lisle nobly. In the name of our dead Congressman, whom we all loved, Let’s reciprocate by giving Kendall, whom the mountains have put up, a rousing majority.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, October 9, 1894.

 

A RESOLUTION was passed by the House of Representatives Tuesday setting aside the third Saturday in January for eulogies on the life and character of the late Hon. Marcus C. Lisle.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, December 14, 1894.

Lisle, Marcus Claiborne

1-22-1895 thru 1-29-1895

IN MEMORIAM

Tribute to the Memory of Hon. M. C. Lisle by His Coleagues of the House

In accordance to a resolution passed some time ago the se4ssion of Saturday was set apart by the House of Representatives for address in memory of Hon. M. C. Lisle.   The following report of the proceedings is from the Courier-Journal.

“At 2 o’clock this afternoon the House suspended all business in order that the members might pay tribute to the memory of the late Representative Marcus C. Lisle, of the Tenth Kentucky district. Mr. Lisle was a very popular member of the House, and during his brief service he made many warm personal friendships. Representative McCreary was the first speaker to do reverence to his deceased colleague. He referred to the many noble qualities of the late Representative from Kentucky, and in choice language sketched his public career from his election as County Judge to a Representative in Congress. He spoke of the bright future that was in store for the deceased and how, with the courage of a philosopher, he laid himself down to die at the very noonday of his life, without a murmur.

Representative Berry was the next speaker. He read his remarks. He knew his late colleague well, they having entered the House together. He dwelt on his personal character and told of many instances when he had displayed those qualities that endeared him to his friends. Representative Caruth was the next speaker. He passed a handsome eulogy on the late Representative from the Tenth district.

Representative Pence, of Colorado, made a few remarks on the character of Mr. Lisle, who he said was one of the most unselfish men he had ever met.

Judge Beckner, Representative Lisle’s successor, said he had known his predecessor for years; had seen him steadily make his way to the front, surmounting obstacles in his path that would have turned back men of less resolute will and firmness. He could add but little to what had already been said.

The last speaker was Representative Breckinridge, although a number of gentlemen who were on the list to speak were unavoidably detained from the House. Col. Breckinridge is a flowery speaker, and the House likes to hear him talk. The eulogies he pronounced on his dead friend were simple and touching. It seemed but yesterday he said, that he was his friend from Clark, accompanied by his bride, at the Capital. They were here on their wedding trip. And what a brief trip it had been. He spoke of the fortitude displayed by his friend when the telegram came telling him that the wife of his bosom was sinking into that sleep which knows no awakening. And following fast upon the death of the mother and child came the grim destroyer to the home of the father. He said the record left by his colleague was profit.

At the request of Mr. McCreary, unanimous consent was given the members to print their eulogies in the Record.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, January 22, 1895.

 

Judge Beckner’s Eulogy

The following are the remarks of Judge Beckner in the House of Representatives on the day set apart in memory of Hon. M. C. Lisle:

“Mr. Speaker, we are all walking the thin ice of a Lethean lake whose depths no mortal power can measure. It will sooner or later engulf every human being, and to the great majority the final catastrophe is reached without warning, or even an intimation that it is near, to others, however, bodily infirmities herald death long before it might be expected in the usual course of nature. The young man in whose memory these services are held knew for years that his days were numbered, and in his waking hours could hear the hoof beats of the pale horse in a race which he realized from the start he could not win. It was death and life with him from the time he entered this House until the closing scene.

Consumption and Bright’s disease had begun their combined assaults upon his system and there could be no escape. He was not a craven spirit, however, and he made a struggle that was as heroic as it was hopeless. Shortly after he had reached home last spring I called to see him, and as I arose to take my leave asked if I could in any way serve him. “I am very much obliged, he answered cheerily, “but I am fighting death and it is a struggle in which no one can help me.” He had rallied somewhat under the balmy influences of our Kentucky spring, and was beginning to think that the end which had seemed so near when he left Washington might after all be for awhile deferred.

Marcus Claiborne Lisle was born on the 23rd day of September, 1862, in Clark county, Ky., within a few miles of the historic spot where Boone made the settlement which bore his name.

It is a beautiful portion of the borderland between the far-famed Blue Grass and a not less worthy region. He had the usual experience of a country-bred boy in attending the district school and working on a farm until almost grown when he had a limited academic training at Winchester, the county seat.

After attending Kentucky University, at Lexington, where he was a classmate of our worthy Chaplain, he was for awhile a student of the law in my office and closed preparation for his professional career at Columbia College, in New York. It was not long after he had been admitted to the bar before he was elected by a most complimentary vote to the office of county judge, a position of much honor and responsibility under the system which prevails in Kentucky, and one peculiarly to be desired by a young man beginning to practice law.

Soon after he had finished his professional education he married Miss Lizzie Bean, a member of one of our oldest and most respected families, and beyond doubt one of the gentlest and most charming girls that favoring nature and careful culture could produce. The future seemed to have in store for him nothing but prosperity and happiness until disease marred the flattering prospect. In the fall of 1890 he went to Colorado, hoping beneath the bright skies and amid the bracing atmosphere of that elevated region to regain the health which it was then evident he had lost. He rallied, but it was merely a respite.

Returning in the spring of 1891, he resumed the discharges of his official duties. It was plainly to be seen, however, by those most intimate with him that he would never fully recover. He was himself deceived as to his condition. Hon. J. W. Kendall at the time a member of this House from the Tenth district of Kentucky, died in March, 1892. When I first heard that Judge Lisle had it in mind to offer for the unexpired term I went to see him and suggested that the son would probably want to succeed his father, with a sentiment in his favor that would make his candidacy well-nigh irresistible.

“Yes,” he replied, decisively, “I understand all that most fully, but it has been the ambition of my life to have a seat in Congress, and if not gratified at once it will never be, as the condition of my health is such that I can not hope to live very long.” He did not succeed in that effort, but in the summer of 1862 was nominated and in November elected to fill the term now drawing to a close. He seemed to gather strength from the canvass, but as soon as the excitement had subsided and the effects of the vigorous exercise and constant exposure to sun and air incident to an active race had worn away he began again to droop.

His gentle, loving wife died about the time that his term of office began, which gave a perceptible impetus to a frailties already painfully apparent. A humble will however enabled him to rally from the effects of this bereavement and held him up through all the strain and struggle not to be avoided by a Representative trying to do his duty toward the men who looked to him to see that they were not ignored in distributing the patronage of a new Administration elected by the party to which he belonged.

He was zealous and diligent, although never well, and rarely able to undertake what he so energetically did. He took his seat at the extra session and like the man that he was, followed the course which his conscience and judgement approved, although in opposition sometimes to the views and wishes of many whose opinions he most highly prized. He continued to come to this Hall long after his strength had so far failed that it would not have been a discredit to him had he quit the field and surrendered to an enemy he could not then reasonably hope to vanish.

In the spring of 1894 he was compelled to take to his bed, but would not distress his friends by apprising them of the serious nature of his condition until death seemed very near indeed. Rallying all his strength he was able to reach home early in May, but ill as he was, would not give up his candidacy for renomination until he had become so weak that he could not even dictate the letters he had never ceased to send over the district with a view to organizing the rallying his friends.

Early in July last he wrote in no gloomy mood to his secretary, whom he had left in charge of his affairs at Washington, to send him without delay the draft for the June installment of his salary, as it would be the last he would ever call for and he did not want his administrator to be annoyed with so small a matter so far away from home. Early in the morning of July 7 he ceased to breath and his spirit took its flight—hither do you ask? Human wisdom can not tell although it has been diligently inquiring throughout all the ages. We must accept the answer that faith gives. There is no other.

 

But whither went his soul, let such relate

Who search the secrets of the future state.

Divines can say but what themselves believe.

Strong proofs they have but not demonstrative.

 

For were all plain then all sides must agree

And faith itself be lost in certainty.

 

How many in their anguish have uttered the cry expressed y the late poet laureate in Maud:

 

Ah Christ, that it were possible

For one short hour to see

The souls that we loved, that they might tell us

What and where they be.

 

Secundus, when asked by Hadrian what was death:

 

It is sleep eternal: the body’s dissolution the rich man’s fear: the poor man’s refuge an inevitable: an uncertain journey: a thief that steals away man: sleep’s father: life’s flight: the departure of the living and the resolution of all.

 

Shakespeare speaks of “our little life” as being “rounded with a sleep” and makes Hamlet say:

 

To die, to sleep:

To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there’s the rub:

For in that sleep of death what dreams may come,

When we have shuffled off this mortal coil.

Must give us pause.

 

When David declares “He shall give his beloved sleep,” it may be the license of the poet, but when God announces to Moses, “Behold, thou shalt sleep with the fathers.” It can reasonably be taken as meaning nothing else than the condition in which he would be after death. Lazarus had been dead four days, and had been placed in the tomb, wrapped, as was the custom of the Jews, so that breathing was impossible. Yet, after the Master had learned all of this. He said: Our friend Lazarus sleepeth;” and St. John significantly adds, “How beit, Jesus spake of his death.” So also when He appeared at the house of Jairus the Savior assured the ruler of the synagogue that his daughter was “not dead, but sleepeth,” and when He called her to life again, Luke significantly records that “her spirit came again.”

But the chronicler of the acts and words of the Son of God does not vouch safe to tell us whither the spirit of the young girl had gone ere it “came again.”

This is the tremendous mystery we so yearn to fathom.

All that humanity can get of its solution is a glimpse.

That death comes we know. That there will be a judgement we believe. What our state is between these momentous events even revelation does not make clear.

Whether there be a Hades or a Sheol or a Purgatory, or whether the soul in truth slumbers until the resurrection truth shall call all the dead simultaneously from their graves, is something we can not find out in this live. And after all what does it matter? In the eternity of God the ages between the killing of Abel and the day of judgement if it be at the same time for all, will not amount to so much as does a single night’s repose in the economy of our mortal lives.

It is this uncertainty as to what shall be after death that makes us incompetent to decide whether life, with its tears, its toil, its travail and its tribulations, be really worth living. Were it not for this darkness beyond the tomb how many more would cease to bear the ills they have and fly either to the rest or to the annihilation which would be preferable to the struggle here below. As it is—

The weariest and most loathest worldly life

That age, ache, penory, and imprisonment

Can lay on nature, is a paradise

To what we fear of death.

Of course the Christian has his faith to strengthen him and the brave man has the courage to continue in the discharge of duty, but every rational being in normal condition must look with dread upon the transition from life to death. It is a blessed provision that affliction and disease in some degree reconcile us to the final change. Much as Judge Lisle yearned for health and preferred, no doubt to live, yet I never heard him express a tremor or a fear or even repine or complain of the fate which for years he felt sure was not far off.

In the introduction to the Republic, Plato makes Cephalus say:

Be assured, Socrates, that when a man is nearly persuaded that he is going to die, he feels concerned about things which never affected him before. Till then he has laughed at those stories about the departed which tell us that he who has done wrong here must suffer for it in the other world; but now his mind is disturbed by the fear that those stories may possibly be true, and either owing to the infirmities of old age, or because he is nearer to the confines of a future state, he has a clearer insight into these mysteries. However that may be, he becomes fuller of misgiving and apprehension, and sets himself to the task of calculating and reflecting whether he has done any wrong to anyone. Hereupon, if he finds his life full of unjust deeds, he is apt to start out of sleep in terror, as children do, and he lives haunted by gloomy anticipation. But if his conscience reproaches him with no injustice, he enjoys the abiding presence of sweet Hope, that “kind nurse of old age,” as Pindar calls it.

Shakespeare in Henry VI has in fewer words express the same thought:

Ah, what a sign it is of evil life

Where death’s approach is seen so terrible.

Judged by these considerations, Marcus Lisle certainly was conscious of no cause for reproach, as life closed quietly with him and there was in his last hours no indication of remorse or dread. He had not lived what we call a religious life, but had always entertained a proud respect for God and his revealed religion.

The inward monitor, a reflective temperament, much reading, and his strong, hard sense, had during the years when young men are so prone to lose sight of the hereafter in their eagerness to enjoy the present, brought him to about that condition as to religion so strikingly expressed by Lucretius:

Religion does not consist of turning unceasingly toward the veiled stone, nor in approaching all the altars, nor in throwing one’s self prostrate on the ground, nor in raising thy hands before the habitations of the gods, nor in deluging the temples with the blood of beasts, nor in heaping vows upon vows, but in beholding all with a peaceful soul.

In the spring of 1893 he joined the Presbyterian Church, of which his wife had been a member, and accepted in deep sincerity the faith which worldly man that he had been, he felt was so potent an element in her gracious character.

Our relations were at all times in his latter years as intimate as they could have been, considering the disparity in ages and somewhat different tastes.

A short time before he died we were talking about his experience in Washington and I asked as to whether he had taken any part in the work of the House. He answered that he attended committee meetings when he could, but that he was rarely able to remain long in his seat owing to his feebleness and the drafts and ventilation of this Hall. He added that sometimes he would grow so weak he was not sure whether he was in the land of the living or whether the figures he saw passing about were the spirits of the illustrious dead who have played their parts here as we are now doing, and have gone the way we will shortly follow. I am not one of those, Mr. Speaker, who believe that power has been given to any one here below to have communication with the departed, but the wisest and most thoughtful in all ages and under every system of religion have believed what the devout Milton has so impressively expressed:

Millions of spiritual creatures walk the earth

Unseen, both when we wake and when we sleep.

What an influence such a conviction must have on our thoughts and actions. Many a time, when vice has allured me or passion has stirred the sea of my soul, I have imagined that I saw standing beyond vice or rising above the storm of passion the form of that dear being who amid all the struggles of an impoverished widowhood, cherished no hope in life so sweet as that her son might enjoy advantages she did not have that he might be able to secure the comforts she could not give him, and that he might so live as to be of service to his fellow-men, whose sorrows and misfortunes so touched her sympathetic heart and immediately there came the strength and the calm which no other influence could have brought.

At the organization of the House when it met in August, 1893, Judge Lisle sought a place on the Committee on Arid Lands, because he had faith in the hereafter the vast territory now useless for any purpose by reason of its want of water can by means of irrigation be made a rich domain, capable of supporting the overflowing population that will so sadly need it in an era that lies before us. He was ambitious to be identified with the regeneration of these possessions now so worthless to the Government, but fraught with such possibilities to the people of the future. His mind always had a practical cast and his sympathies were ever with inquiry and progress. He took a broad liberal view of all questions that came before him and believed this to be the best and greatest age of the world.

He was an ardent lover of his country and its institutions and was in heartiest sympathy with that younger America whose mission it is to plant the banner of “Excelsior” on heights still further toward the rising sun. He had a profound respect for the constitution, but would never have been of those who regard it as a penny whistle to be blown in every market place. He looked upon it rather to be revered as a grand organ designed to give forth its almost divine music in the vast cathedral of human liberty, wherein the whole earth shall finally worship.

He was also, while here, a member of the Committee on Pensions, and had he lived would have dealt generously with the old soldiers of the Union, although reared under influences intensely Southern during the war between the States. The passions and prejudices of the war did nor stir him because it was merely history so far as he was concerned, and its memories brought to his mind no personal experiences. Before going upon the bench Judge Lisle was for some time the owner of The Winchester Democrat, the leading journal of his country, and edited it with no little force and ability. He had been a diligent student of history and had thoughtfully read the best of our standard literature, and wrote with ease and precision.

He loved politics as every intelligent patriot ought to do, and found no employment so congenial as that of mingling with public men and exchanging views with them concerning the passing movements of the day. He had fixed convictions, but was ever tolerant of the views of others. On his father’s side he was of a stock that ran back to the Huguenots, who loved religion and liberty as sincerely as did the Puritans and allowed other men the same freedom of conscience they had sought for themselves and their posterity in this Western World.

His mother was a Hampton and connected with the illustrious family that has so great a place in the history of South Carolina. She was also closely related to Governor Routt, who has been so prominent in the history of Colorado. He leaves one child, an interesting boy of 6, who is amply provided with this world’s goods and what is better still, who has loving and affectionate relatives admirably fitted to care for his proper rearing. Judge Lisle was courteous and considerate in manner, prudent and thoughtful in conversation, possessed of rare tact in dealing with his fellows and had the power to draw about him warm and devoted friends. He had his faults, of course, and also his enemies, as every positive man must have, but the resentments of those whom he may have offended have no doubt passed away and certainly I am not their spokesman.

I do not think any one well acquainted with him, whatever his feelings may have been will take issue with me when I apply to him the lines of the great poet:

His years but young, but his experience old:

His head unmellow’d but his judgement ripe:

And, in a word(for far   behind his worth

Came all the praises that I now bestow).

He was complete in feature and in mind,

With all good grace to grace a gentleman.

 

The people in whose midst he was born and reared, and to whom he never looked in vain for support, will long regard with pride his brief but brilliant career and I shall ever hold in fond remembrance the fact that such a man was my friend. I regret, Mr. Speaker, that I cannot crown his memory with a wreath of immortelles rather than with this feeble but none the less sincere tribute of affectionate regard.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, January 29, 1895

Lisle, Marquiz The nuncupative will of Marquiz Lisle was proven by Thomas Jenkins and John E. Lisle that said testimony occurred on the 15th of November 1833 and ________as follows—— I do bequeath to my sister Nancy Lisle my horse and all my money after all my debts is paid that may be against me. Brother James Lisle to have my great coat and saddle. I bequeath nephew John Lisle my new dress coat and to brother Harrison Lisle 20 dollars that he now owes me there being three hundred dollars in the care of brother James Lisle and nephew Stephen Haggard for forty dollars due from Jefferson Marrow. There is a settlement to be made between myself and James Dyke.

Order Book 10 P. 156 November 1833

Motion of John E. Lisle certificate is granted him for obtaining letters if administration on the estate of Marquiz Lisle decd. with the nuncupative will annexed with Thomas Terrel security.

Order Book 10 P. 156 November 1833

Order for the appraisal of the slaves if any and personal estate of Marquiz Lisle decd.

Order Book 10 P. 157 November 1833

Lisle, Martin The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-8, 11-9-1968
Lisle, Mary MISS MARY LISLE DIES SATURDAY

TUBERCULOSIS CLAIMS YOUNG GIRL AS VICTIM ON SATURDAY NIGHT

Miss Mary Lisle, aged about 20 years succumbed at the home of her parents on Saturday night about 9 o’clock.

She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Connie A. Lisle of the Two Mile pike and had been ill of tuberculosis for several months. In addition to her parents she is survived by four brother and sisters.

The funeral will be preached at the Central Baptist Church today at 11 o’clock by Rev. R. L. Motley with burial in the Winchester Cemetery.

The pallbearers will be: Charles and Earl Bush, James and Noah Perkins and Edgar and Algin Railsback.

THE WINCHESTER SUN MONDAY OCT. 29, 1917

 

LISLE FUNERAL

The out of town people who attended the funeral of Miss Mary Lisle were, Mrs. Frank Merritt and daughter, Sophia, and Mrs. Jim Owens, of Lexington, Rev. and Mrs. Eugene Armitage of Owingsville, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Schorman of Ashland.

THE WINCHESTER SUN, TUESDAY, OCT. 30, 1917

Lisle, Mary Mary Lisle vs. J. B. Lisle & co.

A. J. Tribble administrator and Charles Berkley and other heirs of Mary Lisle filed amended petition.

Order Book 18; P. 359; July Court 1883

 

Mary Lisle vs. J. B. Lisle & co.

Lands divided…one half to Anna F. Lisle and the other half for the use of the estate of Mary Lisle…..

Order Book 18; P. 359; July Court 1883

 

W. D. Rash vs. Jack Berkley & co.

Undivided interest of Jack Berkley in the tract of land …..belonging to the heirs of Mary Lisle decd…..necessary to sell land to pay claim of W. D. Rash…cause continued.

Order Book 18; P. 533 – 534; May Court 1884

 

Mary Lisle administrator vs. Myrtle Mullins

…..defendant Myrtle Mullins who is only 14 years of age to have sale of said land…. The bonds for the purchase money to said land will be made payable to A. J. Tribble as administrator of Mary Lisle decd….

Order Book 18; P. 569 – 570; May Court 1884

 

Mary Lisle vs. J. B. Lisle & co.

Master to ascertain what claims or demands yet exist against the estate of Mary Lisle decd and what assets belong to said estate and what advancements…settlement of estate…

Order Book 18; P. 570; May Court 1884

 

Mary Lisle administrator vs. Myrtle Mullins

…..Anna F. Lisle filed a petition…

Order Book 19; P. 257; May Court 1886

 

Mary Lisle administrator vs. Myrtle Mullins

….it is adjudged that the damages arising from the proceedings of the Kentucky Central Railroad Company now pending in this court and referred to in said petition of Anna F. Lisle belong to the heirs and estate of Mary Lisle decd. and are payable to her administrator for distribution…..

Order Book 19; P. 265; May Court 1886

Lisle, Mary Mary Lisle vs. J. B. Lisle & co.

The death of the plaintiff Mary Lisle is suggested…action revived in the name of A. J. Tribble as administrator of Mary Lisle decd.

Order Book 17; P. 10; May Court 1878

 

Mary Lisle vs. J. B. Lisle & co.

….action re docketed…death of Mary Lisle is suggested…cause continued for a reviver to all of which defendant excepts.

Order Book 17; P. 128; November Court 1878

 

Mary Lisle vs. J. B. Lisle & co.

This day appeared Thomas M. Eginton and filed affidavit as next friend of Martin Mullins and Henry Mullins infant children of Maria Mullins decd. who was a daughter of Mary Lisle upon his motion it is ordered that this case be revived in the name of A. J. Tribble, Adam and Mary Lisle and in the name of Frances Lisle, Charley Barkley, F. M. Barkley, John Barkley, Sennett Barkley and Mary Rutledge and her husband Samuel Rutledge (the last five children and heirs and Sally A. Rutledge) and Caroline Sampson and Edward Sampson her husband, Fanny Striker and her husband A. D. Striker, Henry Mullins and Martin Mullins ( the last four children and heirs of Maria Mullins), Thomas M. Eginton next friend of Henry Mullins and Martin Mullins. Lula M. Brunner, Mary J. Brunner, Marcus Brunner and John S. Brunner the last four children of Mary J. Brunner decd. and A. P. Brunner guardian of Lula M. Brunner, Mary J. Brunner, Marcus Brunner and John S. Brunner and Minerva Bush and her husband Robert Bush, Lydia McCord and her husband John McCord, Mollie Carroll and her husband J. A. Carroll and John Baldwin the last three children and heirs of Margaret Baldwin, A. J. Brunner the husband of the late Mary J. Brunner and Colby H. Mullins the husband of the late Maria Mullins be all of the real representatives of the late Mary Lisle except the defendant John B. Lisle against whom this action is pending.

Order Book 17; P. 133; November Court 1878

Lisle, Mary Lee Wednesday, of fever and pneumonia, Mary Lee, daughter of Thomas Lisle and wife, aged about seven years. Burial at the family residence, funeral by Rev. B. B. Bailey.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday October 19,1894

Lisle, Mayme Miss Mayme Lisle, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. I.D. Lisle, and Mr. Gratz Conkwright were married in Lexington, Tuesday. They will take a trip East before leaving to Texas, where Mr. Conkwright and Jesse Lisle have purchased a farm in partnership, and where they will make their future home. They will be greatly missed by scores of friends, who sincerely wish for them a long and happy life.

The Winchester Sun-Sentinel Thursday, October, 3, 1907

Lisle, Mrs. Alice Dykes The Winchester Sun   Sat., 11-9-1929
Lisle, Mrs. Ann Died—Sunday, of disease of the lungs, at her home near Four Mile creek. Mrs. Ann Lisle, aged about 65 years. Buried in the family graveyard at the residence of John Lisle Sr., funeral by Rev. Richard French. Deceased was the widow of Manson Lisle, who died a number of years ago and before her marriage she was a Miss Parrish. She leaves six sons and two daughters to mourn her loss.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, March 6, 1894

 

JAMES H. LISLE has bought the interest of most of the other heirs in the dower of his mother, Mrs. Ann Lisle, on Lower Four Mile. The tract consists of about 70 acres, and is divided into eight shares.   Price paid, $ 75.00 per acre.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, March 13, 1894.

 

JAS. H. LISLE has sold five-eights of the dower of his mother, Mrs. Ann Lisle, at $ 75.00 per share.   This was the price paid the other heirs by Mr. James Lisle and not $ 75.00 per acre as was mentioned in a late issue of this paper.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, March 16, 1894.

 

County Court Orders-Jessie N. Hodgkin appointed administrator of Mrs. Ann Lisle, with Roger E. Quisenberry, Jas. B. Eubank and David O. Meredith appraisers.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, April 3, 1894.

 

County Court Items

Mrs. Robt. Bush brought suit for the division of the dower of her mother, Mrs. Ann Lisle. Roger Quisenberry, Joe B. Carroll, and A. H. Hart were appointed a committee to divide it.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, June 1, 1894

Lisle, Mrs. Ann Died

At her home, near Elkin Thursday night, Mrs. Ann Lisle, wife of Phil. C. Lisle, after a short illness. She leaves a husband and four children to mourn her loss. The funeral was preached at the family residence by Rev. J. S. Wills and the remains were buried in the family graveyard of her father Theudas Dykes, near Boonesboro.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Nov. 21, 1899

 

Jas. Dykes and Jesse Dykes, of Richmond, attended the burial of their cousin, Mrs. P. C. Lisle, near Boonesboro Saturday.

The Winchester Democrat Fri., Nov. 24, 1899

Lisle, Mrs. Anna Frances The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-10-1921
Lisle, Mrs. Anna Virginia

Vaughn

The Winchester Sun   Fri., 5-16, 5-17-2003
Lisle, Mrs. Annie F. Mrs. Annie F. Lisle, wife of Brax Lisle has sued the L. N. railroad for $450 damages for the killing of a couple of horses some months ago.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, April, 19, 1895

Lisle, Mrs. Bessie Lee The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-25-1994
Lisle, Mrs. Catherine The Winchester Sun   Sat., 8-25-1923
Lisle, Mrs. Chilton DIED-Thursday, at St. Louis, Mo., of heart disease, Mrs. Osee Sutherland, wife of Rolla Sutherland.   She was formerly from this county, and was a sister of W. I. Bush and Mrs. J. W. Poynter. Another sister, Mrs. Chilton Lisle, died a few months ago.

The Democrat, Wednesday, December 28, 1892.

Lisle, Mrs. Cinda The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-4, 5-5-1931
Lisle, Mrs. Eliza A. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 9-2-1939
Lisle, Mrs. Elizabeth Winn The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-21-1966
Lisle, Mrs. Ellen Lipscomb The Winchester Sun   Thur., 12-27, 12-28-1962
Lisle, Mrs. Emma Daniel The Winchester Sun   Tues., 8-15, 8-16-1967
Lisle, Mrs. Ethel Merritt The Winchester Sun   Sat., 3-26-1988
Lisle, Mrs. Grace Thomas The Winchester Sun   Fri., 1-8-1999
Lisle, Mrs. John The Lexington Gazette tells the following on a well known Methodist minister, Brother Dick Redd, who astonished his audience on last Sunday night by using the following illustration: “Brethren: There are too many John T. Lisles in the church who wish to take only the sunny side of religion rather than by taking up the cross and following the cross absolutely. When Dr. Jas. Bush told Mrs. Lisle that she could only live a few hours, there sat by her death bed her two cousins, Mattie and Marie. The latter was just blooming into womanhood and was fair to behold, and Marie was as old and ugly as Leah. Mrs. Lisle said: ‘John my dear husband, I want you to marry Marie (Leah) to raise up my children.’ John T. blubbered out, “My dear wife, won’t Mattie do? Mrs. Lisle flew into a rage and said abruptly, ‘No’ and it had such an effect on her that when Dr. Bush returned he found her sitting up in bed eating crackers. She lived long enough to bury all her five children after that.”

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, February 25, 1898

Lisle, Mrs. Julia Elkin The Winchester Sun   Fri., 10-28-1955
Lisle, Mrs. Katherine Crosby The Winchester Sun   Wed., 12-26, 12-27-1962
Lisle, Mrs. Lee Elkin The Winchester Sun Thur., 7-3-1913
Lisle, Mrs. Lenora Merritt The Winchester Sun   Tues., 12-5, 12-6-1972
Lisle, Mrs. Lizzie B. DEATH – Of Mrs. Lizzie B. Lisle, Wife of Hon. M. C. Lisle.

Death at all time and under all circumstances is painful to contemplate but it is seldom a death occasions such wide spread sorrow as was maintained Saturday when the tidings of the death of Mrs. Lizzie B. Lisle, wife of Judge M. C. Lisle, which occurred at the family residence on South Maple street, was announced.   During his wonderfully successful business and political career she has been his helper and counselor, sympathizing with him and cheering him in moments of depression and rejoicing with a loving wifely pride in this success. While he appreciated the kindness and partiality of friends, and fully appreciated the good will of his people, it was to the wife of his bosom that he turned for the loving appreciation and inspiration that was the main spring of his ambition. For months they had looked to March 4th as the day that should have fulfilled the culmination of Judge Lisle’s political ambition, but instead of being one of the proudest moments of his life, it was by far the saddest. The fact that he was the chosen representative in the grand council of the nation of a hundred thousand constituents could not mitigate the pangs of grief, and loving hearts could only throb in sympathy without ability to do more. God’s ways are not our ways and His actions are not to be questioned, else we would wonder why she should be cut down in the full vigor of her young womanhood, with so much to live for and with such a vista of love and usefulness opening before her; when the children whom God had given her so much needed a mother a loving tenderness; when her husband needed her wifely ministrations, and when the public needed her goodness and cheerful disposition which brightened everything around her. With mother, brothers, husband, children, friends, a lovely home surrounded by everything that has a tendency to make life beautiful, she is taken and other, whose life is a burden to themselves and whose present, past and future has nothing pleasant to look upon, are left. We know not why these things are so, but when we shall see Him as He is then shall we know and be satisfied. Mrs. Lisle was about 27 years old, the only daughter and eldest child of Mrs. Anna W. Bean, her father, Asa Bean having been dead for a number of years. She was educated in Cincinnati and took a high rank in her classes. She was handsome in form and features and being possessed of a bright happy disposition she was universally popular, not only with those of her own circle or society, but with the working class also for whom she always had a smile and a cheerful word. Her marriage with the handsome and ambitious young lawyer, M. C. Lisle, was the society event of the season and they began their married life with the best wishes from everybody. Three children were born to them two of whom survive, a boy about three years old and another about ten days old. Judge Lisle, who was in Washington was telegraphed during the early part of the week, which was the first intimation the public had of her dangerous illness.   Not withstanding every effort known to medical skill was put forth, she grew steadily worse until the end came Saturday. Retaining consciousness until the last she quietly disposed of temporal affairs and calmly went down into the dark valley on the other side of which is peace and light and life eternal. The funeral was held Monday at the family residence which was filled to the utmost with friends anxious to pay this last tribute of respect to her memory.   Eld. L. J. Spencer and Rev. J. J.Chisholm offered the singing being done by a quartet composed of Mesdemere Jas. S. Winn and Will Miller and Mercer W. R. Logan and James Simpson.   The pall-bearers were Messrs, H.P. Thomson, T. C. Ribinson, J. M. Benton; C. E. Rees, W. F. Dandridge and J. H. Evans. The handsome casket was covered by beautiful floral designs which were lavished by loving hands. The procession of carriages was one of the longest ever seen on our streets. At the grave the simple and expressive burial service of the Presbyterian church was read by Dr. Chishold, and all that was mortal of one of our fairest and best wives and mothers was consigned to the tomb. After a touching prayer by Eld. Spencer the people were dismissed and the family returned to the beautiful home from which the central figure, the life and light of the household was gone. In common with a host of other friends we tender out heartfelt sympathy to the husband, mother and brothers and invoke the blessing of Him who careth for the sparrow, in behalf of the motherless babies.

The Democrat, Wednesday, March 8, 1893.

 

In Memory of Mrs. M. C. Lisle.

If in life we praise the merits of the worthy, may we not in the death of a friend offer a tribute in their memory. So often the evil which we do live after us and the good so soon forgotten that I seek to impress upon our minds the tender recollections of a rare and dear companionship. We grieve over the absence of such a friend, but it will be consoling when we meet in friendly but broken union to speak of her womanly chars and friendly attributes for she was everybody’s friend and gathered from every life some grace or virtue and by a strange and secret alchemy made them all her own. As a bee gathers its honey from every bloom and blade and flower, hurting none but making sweeter by its contact, so she left us when she went away. Every kind and condition of men raised her unselfish disposition and gracious manners.   I heard a man of lowly station say “That he would gladly given a portion of his days to prolong her life.” And I offer this as a comfort not soon to be forgot. She was kindly affectionate, and many households contain some sweet and mute reminder of her thoughtfulness. Such a life indeed went out too soon for when was young but such a character will outlive the number of the days of her life. She was prepared by birth and education to adorn the home to which so many honors had lately come. To her husband she was able to counsel and worthy to confide and in all the relations of life she was so faithful and tender and loving and true that quoting from the beautiful prayer of the pastor we can almost get a glimpse of her in the Saviour’s arms.

The Democrat, Wednesday, March 15, 1893.

 

DIED-Friday, the infant son of Judge M. C. Lisle died and was buried beside the body of its mother, who preceded it but a few days.

The Democrat, Wednesday, March 22, 1893.

Lisle, Mrs. Lizzie Eubank The Winchester Sun   Sat., 10-5-1946
Lisle, Mrs. Loraine The Winchester Sun   Tues., 4-27-1999
Lisle, Mrs. Malinda Stevens The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-8-2011
Lisle, Mrs. Marjorie Ann Flynn The Winchester Sun   Tues., 8-20-2002
Lisle, Mrs. Minnie Winn The Winchester Sun   Wed., 6-25-1952
Lisle, Mrs. Murty C. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 9-23, 9-24-1964
Lisle, Mrs. Nancy Jane Hampton The Winchester Sun   Wed., 11-1-1916
Lisle, Mrs. Nannie The Winchester Sun   Fri., 3-4, 3-5-1932
Lisle, Mrs. Nannie Quisenberry The Winchester Sun   Sat., 7-7-1928
Lisle, Mrs. Nora M. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 2-29-1972
Lisle, Mrs. P. C. Germantown

Mrs. P. C. Lisle died Saturday a 4 o’clock p. m. Her funeral was preached at Providence Sunday at 2:30 p. m. by Rev. T. C. Ecton, assisted by Rev. Richard French, after which the burial in the Theudus Dykes graveyard.

The Sun-Sentinel   Thur., Nov. 17, 1904

Lisle, Mrs. Rachel DEATHS   Near Boonesboro, after a lingering illness, Mrs. Rachel Lisle, aged 45 year.

The Democrat, Wednesday, September 2, 1891.

Lisle, Mrs. Rosa Lee Lisle The Winchester Sun   Fri., 7-15-1977
Lisle, Mrs. Rufus Mrs. Rufus Lisle, residing on the Leestown pike, met with a very painful accident Wednesday night at her home. She was walking down the stairs in the main hall, it being dark, and supposing she had reached the floor was pitched down probably two steps. She was rendered unconscious but her groans quickly brought assistance. Dr. Skillman was summoned and it was discovered that one leg had been fractured in two places just below the hip and just above the knee. The bones were set and Dr. Skillman says the wounds will not prove serious.—Lexington Press

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, February 28, 1894

Lisle, Mrs. Rufus The Winchester Sun   Fri., 12-23-1927
Lisle, Mrs. Ruth Benton The Winchester Sun   Wed., 4-25-1984
Lisle, Mrs. Stella Sewell The Winchester Sun   Sat., 8-13, 8-15-1977
Lisle, Mrs. Susan Shelby Died-At Boonesboro, Madison county, Kentucky, on the 19th, inst., after a long and painful illness, Mrs. Susan Shelby Lisle wife of Mr. Henry Lisle, in the seventy fourth year of her age. The deceased was nearly related to some of the early pioneers of the State, her father and mother were in the Fort at Boonesboro with Col. Boone, and her oldest brother was the first child buried in it. She was a granddaughter of Capt. Nathaniel Hart, who came to Kentucky in 1775, being one among the first to occupy the soil.   The father, mother, and grandfather now sleep together in the same grave yard. She was a niece of the wife of Gov. Isaac Shelby, who in his day was one of the most honored citizens of the commonwealth. Thus one more link in the chain which binds past generations to the present is broken—one more friend of long years acquaintance is gone, but as we trust to join the circle around the Fathers throne in heaven. Mrs. Lisle was married in the 1829, to William Henry Lisle of Madison county, and in all the relation of wife, mother, and friend, was ever faithful and affectionate. For more than thirty years she had been a member of the Christian church and let a consistent, pious life and adorned the doctrine of her profession. She died in one mile and a half of the place of her birth, and in that immediate neighborhood spent the whole of her life.   She leaves a kind husband, three sons, and two daughters to mourn her loss. Farewell dear friend.

Thou art gone to the grave, but we will not deplore thee,

Though sorrow and darkness encompass the tomb,

The savior has passed through its portals before thee,

And the lamps of his love is thy guide though the gloom.

Clark County Democrat     Wed., 4-25-1872

Lisle, Mrs. Talitha DEATHS; At Chattanooga, Tenn., July 16th, Mrs. Talitha Lisle, aged about forty years. She was the daughter of Capt. Zach Bush and a sister of Mrs. J. W. Poynter and W. L. Bush, of this county. Her husband, Chilton Allan Lisle, died less than a year ago. He was a near relative of the Lisle’s of this county.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, July 27, 1892

Lisle, Nancy MISS NANCY LISLE, of Lexington, daughter of the late Rufus Lisle, fell while practicing in the gymnasium and was rendered unconscious for twelve hours by her head striking the floor. The doctors fear concussion of the brain. This family has been singularly unfortunate. One son fell from a steamboat and was drowned; another was burned to death; a grown daughter was thrown from a buggy and killed; the mother fell and broke her hip.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, December 18, 1894.

Lisle, Nancy Will Book 1, Page 271

Dated: September 16, 1869

Recorded: February 23, and March 22, 1875

Lisle, Nancy Ellen The Winchester Sun Fri., 9-13-1912
Lisle, Nicholas Winn The Winchester Sun   Tues., 5-24-1949
Lisle, Ora The Winchester Sun   Tues., 7-2-1957
Lisle, Paul B. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 11-8, 11-9-1983
Lisle, Phillip Clark THE residence of Phil Lisle, near Elkin was burned Wednesday night. He had $500 insurance on his house and $100 on his furniture in Poynter’s “Big I” agency. His loss will be considerably greater.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, April 5, 1895.

 

PHIL C. LISLE TAKEN BY DEATH

Well Known Clark County Farmer Passes Away At Home Near Elkin, Saturday Morning

Phil C. Lisle, age 63 years , well known Clark County farmer passed away at his home in the county near Elkin at 7:20 o’clock Saturday morning after a lingering illness of several months.

He was born and reared in this county and was greatly honored and respected by all persons with whom he came in contact.

Besides his widow, who before the marriage, was Mrs. Ellen Lipscomb, he is survived by the following children: Leon Lisle, of this city, Mrs. D. H. Whitehead, of Louisville,Mrs. Ray Funk, of Detroit, Mich., Mrs. Prewitt Vaughn, of the county, Harry, Octavo Reed and Ruth A. Lisle, who lives at home.

The following step-children also survive: Nathan Lipscomb and Mrs. M. L. Shearer, both of this city and Ben Lipscomb, of Ford, Clark County, two brothers, C. A. and Sam Lisle, of the county.

The deceased was a member of the Forest Grove Christian Church and an active member of the Winchester Masonic Lodge No. 20.

Funeral services Sunday afternoon at four o’clock at the Main Street Christian Church, conducted by the Rev. Claude Neal, the pastor. Burial in the Winchester Cemetery, with the Masons in charge.   Pallbearers, J. B. Eubank, Ben Lisle, Thorn Bush. E. K. Broaddus, Ealler Dykes, and George Fox.

THE WINCHESTER SUN, JUNE 19, 1926

Lisle, Phillip Clark PHIL C. LISLE TAKEN BY DEATH

Well Known Clark County Farmer Passes Away At Home Near Elkin, Saturday Morning

Phil C. Lisle, age 63 years , well known Clark County farmer passed away at his home in the county near Elkin at 7:20 o’clock Saturday morning after a lingering illness of several months.

He was born and reared in this county and was greatly honored and respected by all persons with whom he came in contact.

Besides his widow, who before the marriage, was Mrs. Ellen Lipscomb, he is survived by the following children: Leon Lisle, of this city, Mrs. D. H. Whitehead, of Louisville, Mrs. Ray Funk, of Detroit, Mich., Mrs. Prewitt Vaughn, of the county, Harry, Octavo Reed and Ruth A. Lisle, who lives at home.

The following step-children also survive: Nathan Lipscomb and Mrs. M. L. Shearer, both of this city and Ben Lipscomb, of Ford, Clark County, two brothers, C. A. and Sam Lisle, of the county.

The deceased was a member of the Forest Grove Christian Church and an active member of the Winchester Masonic Lodge No. 20.

Funeral services Sunday afternoon at four o’clock at the Main Street Christian Church, conducted by the Rev. Claude Neal, the pastor. Burial in the Winchester Cemetery, with the Masons in charge. Pallbearers, J. B. Eubank, Ben Lisle, Thorn Bush. E. K. Broaddus, Ealler Dykes, and George Fox.

The Winchester Sun   Sat., 6-19-1926

Lisle, Rachel Rachel, the two-year-old daughter of Henry and Alice Lisle, died on Saturday last, October 14th at Boonesborough and was buried the following day in the family burying ground. Mrs. J. D. Dykes, of this place is a sister of Mrs. Lisle.—Richmond Register

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, October 25, 1893

Lisle, Ruby Scott The Winchester Sun   Sat., 1-28, 1-30-1978
Lisle, Rufus The Winchester Sun   Tues., 10-11-1955
Lisle, Rufus Sr. RUFUS LISLE DEAD

He Passes Away Sunday, at His Home in This County

His Career as a Breeder and Turfman.

Funeral To-Day At Eleven O’clock

Mr. Rufus Lisle, one of Kentucky’s oldest turfmen and breeders of thoroughbred horses, died Sunday afternoon at his residence in this county, aged seventy-two years.

Of his career as a turfman, John K. Stringfield the well-known writer on turf matters says: He has been one of the most successful of Kentucky’s small breeders. The Derby winner Macbeth, the great handicap horse Jacobin the good performers Robespierre, Castaway 11. Laura Agnes and Dollikins being from his farm. His most noted mares are Lucky Lisle and Agnes, and they have produced a fortune for him.

Mr. Lisle’s stud was at no time an extensive one, but successful stud matrons seemed to develop in mare of little promise when owned by the lucky “Rufus” Lisle.   His first venture with thoroughbreds was the purchase of an Asteroid colt named Master John, for $210, a half interest in which he gave to a well known trainer, who developed him into such a promising looking colt that he was readily sold for $5000. To illustrate his good fortune, after disposing of the colt the high-priced youngster took a severe cold and became a roarer and thus he never was able to show in public the form he had exhibited in private. His trainer often said that America has seen few better two year olds and but for his illness Master John might have gone down to history with the El Rio Reys and the Futurity winners. Ella Jackson, Actress, and Harry Peyton then came from the Lisle farm, but his greatest success as a breeder dawned when he came into the possession of Lucky Lisle and Agnes. From the latter came Gilt, Jacobin, Macbeth11, Girondes, Robespierre and Laura Agnes, while in addition to Felix and Dollikins, Lucky Lisle threw that good horse Castaway 11, the hero of last year’s Brooklyn Handicap. While Mr. Lisle got fairly good prices for his horses, he was always a ready seller, and for that reason many bargains were obtained at his farm. He however, received $7000 for Jacobin, $4000 for Macbeth11, $3,500 for Robespirre and $3000 for Dollikins, which are the highest priced horses he owned in later days. To breed such an array of turf lights from but two mares is distinction enough and Agnes and Lucky Lisle have made their breeder’s fame safe to the turf history.

Though lucky with his horses Mr. Lisle experienced misfortune in his family affairs. One of his daughters fell at the blighting touch of consumption, another was killed in a runaway accident and a favorite son accidentally stepped off a boat in the Mississippi river and was drowned, his body never being recovered.

Two months ago feeling the near approach of death, and after the physician had told him that the end was not far off, Mr. Lisle expressed the desire to see a clergyman.   The Rev. Dr. Bartholomew of the Broadway Christian church, called to see him and told him the old, old story, Although Mr. Lisle had been a man who never listened to the teachings of Christianity and who had perhaps never been inside of a church since reaching man’s estate he listened and was converted.   He joined the church of Dr. Bartholomew and was received into its fellowship. He called in all his horses that were racing at the time of his conversion and died not a turfman, but a Christian.

RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT.

The Directors of the Fayette National Bank met yesterday and passed following resolution:

Whereas, We have heard with the deepest sorrow of the death of our friend and associate. Rufus Lisle, be it an able and efficient officer who by his business foresight and wise counsel contributed large to the success of this institution having been connected with its Board of Directors for many years, and we desire to bear testimony to his worth and sterling integrity, to his uniform courtesy and high character. We offer to his bereaved family our profound sympathy in this their house of bitter sorrow.

Resolved, That the Board attend the sad rites of burial in a body.

R. S. Bullock, S. Bassett

Cashier         President.

THE LEXINGTON MORNING TRANSCRIPT NOV. 17, 1891

 

Sunday, at his home in Lexington, after a long illness, Rufus Lisle. He was a native of this county, being a brother of John and Claiborne Lisle. He was a good business man and had acquired quite a fortune. He leaves a wife, formerly Miss Halley of Boonesboro, and several children.

THE WINCHESTER DEMOCRAT NOV. 18,1891

 

The will of Rufus Lisle deceased, was probated yesterday morning. After all debts are paid the rest is to be divided as follows: The home farm on the Leestown Pike with stock and implements also the income from ten shares in the Fayette National Bank, ten shared each in a Memphis Tennessee, bank, and Security Trust and Safety Vault Company of this city, to his wife. At her death his five children, James L. Lisle is given 850 acres in Scott county and fifty shares of stock in the Fayette National Bank.   Virginia Lisle receives 271 acres of Scott county land and fifty shares of Bank stock. Three hundred and fifty acres of land of land, $10,000 in cash and 100 bank shares to be equally divided between his two daughters.   After Mrs. Lisle death the home farm of 1885 acres will go to Hampton Lisle. He directs also that all his horses be sold. Lexington Transcript.

The Democrat, Wednesday, November 25, 1891

 

THE Courier-Journal announces Jas. L. Lisle, of this county, as having been appointed a Colonel on Gov. Brown’s staff. Col. Lisle lives in Scott county and is a son of the late Rufus Lisle, of Lexington, but is very closely related to the family of that name here.

The Democrat, Wednesday, December 23, 1891.

 

At the sale of the racehorses owned by the late Rufus Lisle, the famous old brood mare Agnes, sixteen years old brought $5,000. She was the damn of Jacobin, Robespeirre, MacBeth II, etc. Of her produce seven were winners, all in fact old enough to be trained. They won over $65,000. His other great brood mare, Lucy Lisle, aged fourteen, also $5,000. All of her colts but one were winners; the amount won being nearly $45,000. By far the largest part of this was won by Castaway II. Several young things brought from $1,200 to $1,800.

The Winchester Democrat     Wed., 3-23-1892

 

C.H. Stoll’s attack on Kentucky

The newspapers are almost unanimous in the “skinning and roasting” of C.H. Stoll, formerly of Lexington, for his recent outrageous attack on Kentucky and Kentuckians. The Courier-Journal in its editorial says: “His son-in-law to whose difficulties as a tobacco planter he refers so feelingly, bears a given name and surname that means something to Kentuckians of the old regime in this section of the State.” The son-in-law alluded to is Halley Lisle, whose father was the late Rufus Lisle, and his mother was Miss Halley, both natives of Clark. The Halley’s once owned all the land at and around Boonesboro, including the old Fort and town site and were among the pioneers there, while the Lisle family was equally numerous and prominent in Clark. Mrs. Rufus Lisle still lives at the old home place near Lexington. Mr. Stoll’s attack on his native State is regrettable, but not surprising to those who know him and his career in Kentucky. Cold, grasping, utterly selfish. After making a fortune out of the people of his native State he now turns his back upon and abuses them in the most vicious fashion. He can well be spared as he has been for the last ten years. Even the Courier-Journal can differentiate between a man like Stoll and his splendid son-in-law, Halley Lisle.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, December 8, 1908

Lisle, Ruth The Winchester Sun   Tues., 5-5-2009
Lisle, Samuel G. SAM G. LISLE PASSES AWAY

Former Winchester Barber Succumbs At Home Of Brother, Near Elkin Station

Sam G. Lisle, 46 years old, died at the home of his brother, Connie Lisle, Friday morning at ten o’clock near Elkin Station, after an illness of several months.

The deceased followed the barber trade in this city, for many years, but retired because of ill health.

He is survived by his widow, three sons Roy Lisle, of Nelson County; Clyde Lisle, of Clark County; and Arthur Lisle of Viva, Ky.; two sisters Ethel Lisle and Virgina Lisle, both of Viva, Ky., and one brother, Connie Lisle, of Clark County.

The funeral services have not been made.

THE WINCHESTER SUN FRIDAY, JULY 8, 1927

Lisle, Samuel G. SAM G. LISLE PASSES AWAY

Former Winchester Barber Succumbs At Home Of Brother, Near Elkin Station

Sam G. Lisle, 46 years old, died at the home of his brother, Connie Lisle, Friday morning at ten o’clock near Elkin Station, after an illness of several months.

The deceased followed the barber trade in this city, for many years, but retired because of ill health.

He is survived by his widow, three sons Roy Lisle, of Nelson County; Clyde Lisle, of Clark County; and Arthur Lisle of Viva, Ky.; two sisters Ethel Lisle and Virgina Lisle, both of Viva, Ky., and one brother, Connie Lisle, of Clark County.

The funeral services have not been made.

THE WINCHESTER SUN FRIDAY, JULY 8, 1927

Lisle, Shelby Elkin The Winchester Sun   Thur., 1-27, 1-28-1977
Lisle, Solomon S. A Fort Worth dispatch says: By a divorce suit here a romantic and very strange story is given to the public.   The plaintiff, Solomon S. Lisle, a traveling salesman, alleges that on February 8th he was invited to call on Mrs. Belle Fonteure. He went and she insisted that they be married. He declined and the woman, the petitioner states, drew a pistol, leveled it at his head and a minister, who had been sent for, arrived and they were married, he at all times being secretly threatened with instant death if he demurred. The petitioner alleges that he has not seen the woman since the marriage and asks that it be declared void. The ceremony was performed by Rev. J. Morgan Wells, formerly pastor of Baptist church at Mt. Sterling and who has frequently preached in this county.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, March 9, 1894.

Lisle, W. J. Elkin; W. J. Lisle is visiting his brother Manson at Donerall, Fayette county.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, May 15, 1894

Lisle, William AGED CITIZEN PASSES TO REST

Mr. William Lisle, age 63, Of Elkin Died Monday Night From Tuberculosis.

Mr. William Lisle, age 63, died Monday night at 7:30 at the home of his brother John Riffe Lisle, at Elkin, Ky., with tuberculosis. He has been ill for about eight months and for the past week has been in a serious condition.

He is one of the best known citizen of Clark County and had many friends. Mr. Lisle is survived by four brother, James H., John Riffe, Andy and M. P. Lisle, also two sisters, Mrs. Sarah Bush of this county and Mrs. Nannie Paton of Texas.

Funeral services will be held on Wednesday at 12:30 by Rev. J. H. Harding at the home of Mr. John R. Lisle and burial will take place in the family burial grounds at Elkin.

THE WINCHESTER SUN 9/3/1918

Lisle, Winn The Winchester Sun   Tues., 6-10-1913
Lisle, Winston Russell The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-14, 9-15-1992
List, Hillis Eminence, Ky., – Hillis List, county Attorney of Henry county died at his home in Pleasureville after an illness which had lasted for several months.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, February 2, 1909

List, Rosa DIED-Miss Mary Kenney died in Brooksville Monday of typhoid fever. She was one of the most beautiful young ladies in Bracken county and was a society leader. She was shortly to have been married to Frank List, a young farmer. Mr. List was attending the funeral of his sister, Miss Rosa List, when the sad news as conveyed to him, and he is now nearly prostrated with grief.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, February 15, 1895.

Litchfield, Alfred D. Jr. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 11-19-1991
Liter, Joseph Killed By A Fall

At Flemingsburg, Ky., Joseph Liter a farmer about sixty-five years of age, who resides at Elizaville in Fleming county, fell from a wagon while hauling tobacco to Maysville Thursday afternoon and was killed. He leaves a family.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., March 19, 1901

Liter, Mrs. Mildred Owsley The Winchester Sun   Tues., 9-22-1987
Liter, Mrs. Susie Crim The Winchester Sun   Wed., 12-28-1932
Liter, Mrs. Viola Day O’Connell The Winchester Sun   Tues., 3-19-1968
Liter, Robert G. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 6-9-1916
Liter, William N. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 4-14-1994
Litrell, Anita Mildred The Winchester Sun   Sat., 12-26-1925
Litsey, William The Winchester Sun Wed., 12-8-1920
Litten, Jess Burton The Winchester Sun   Wed., 12-12, 12-14-2001
Litten, Mrs. Ruby Hardwick The Winchester Sun   Wed., 4-5, 4-6-1995
Litteral, Amanda Jo The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-21-1986
Litteral, Clifford H. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 6-10-2000
Litteral, Ford Austin The Winchester Sun   Thur., 10-21, 10-22-1993
Litteral, Mrs. Cora Black The Winchester Sun   Fri., 4-1, 4-2-1955
Litteral, Mrs. Eva Mae The Winchester Sun Fri., 8-17, 8-18-2007
Litteral, Mrs. Martha Morris The Winchester Sun   Tue., 1-10-1978
Litteral, Mrs. Precia Jones The Winchester Sun   Fri., 10-18, 10-19-1968
Litteral, Mrs. Vina Lee Martin The Winchester Sun   Tues., 8-26, 8-27-1997
Litteral, Sam The Winchester Sun   Tues., 9-14, 9-15-1965
Litteral, Thomas E. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 4-1, 4-2-1969
Litteral, Willie The Winchester Sun   Mon., 6-23, 6-24-2008
Litterel, Chris Killed By A Deputy Sheriff

Williamsburg, Ky., Oct. 21

Deputy Sheriff George Davis shot and instantly killed Chris Litterel at Mt. Morgan coal mines.   Davis was attempting to arrest another party for drunkenness. Litterel interfered, drew his pistol and fired. Davis used a Winchester rifle. Davis immediately came to town and surrendered.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Oct. 24, 1902

Little A. B. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 2-14, 2-15-1962
Little Family An Unfortunate Family

The Little family, of Breathitt county, has been pursued by a strange fatality. Joseph, John, Jason, and James Little were four brothers, who lived in the same neighborhood in Breathitt county, and who reared large families. The four men were highly respected citizens and had hosts of warm friends.

Of the younger member of the family Thomas was assassinated on the streets of Jackson by an unknown party: Jerry, the leader of the celebrated Strong and Little mountain feud, who had survived the ordeal of being shot twenty-seven times, was killed by a log rolling over him: William was shot and killed by a boy near Jackson: Robert was murdered in a saloon at Elkatawa, while Joseph, one of the older men, was knocked down by a horse during the past year, from which he received fatal injuries, and his brother John died of la grippe. Mart was killed Sunday by a man named Miller.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, December 6, 1895

Little, ______(jailer) The Winchester Sun Thur., 6-19-1913
Little, Alfred A Bad Man.

If Jesse Fields, of Breathitt county, is not a very bed man he has been much maligned. Not content with being mixed up in the French-Eversole feud, where he was a trusted leader of the French side, he has been in trouble ever since. He and Joe Adkins were indicted for the murder of Judge Combs, at Hazard and the latter is now serving a life term in the pen with a probability of being joined by Fields when the latter is tried. A few weeks ago Alfred Little, an ex-convict and a bad man generally, who has been keeping a blind tiger, was shot at Jackson. His leg was amputated to save his life, but the operation was not successful and he died. James Moore, a deputy Sheriff, was shot while at home in bed at the same time. The Breathitt Circuit Court, which adjourned last week, has indicted Fields for these crimes also, and the probabilities are that he will spend the remainder of his days in durance vile.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, June 20, 1899

Little, Belle WITH A RAZOR.

Niece of J. B. Marcum Committed Suicide near Jackson.

Jackson, Ky., Oct. 27.-Miss Belle Little, 24, committed suicide at Elktown, this county, by almost severing her head from the body with a razor. Her mother and sisters were in the adjoining room and, hearing a groan rushed in to find the pretty young suicide writhing in the agonies of death.   A note pined carefully in her hand told the tale of her unhappiness and gave her reasons for ending her life.   Miss Little was a niece of the late feud leader, J. B. Marcum, who was killed last May in the courthouse here while standing in the door with Capt. Ewen. Her father, Jack Little was killed four years ago in a fight by John Wilson, the latter being convicted of manslaughter and sentenced to serve three years in the penitentiary. He was recently released. During his confinement his wife obtained a divorce and was married to George Spencer, a son of Jailer William Spencer, of Breathitt county.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, October 30, 1903.

 

A Breathitt County Suicide

Miss Belle Little, of Breathitt county, committed suicide Monday by cutting her throat with a razor.   Despondency was the cause. She was a niece of the late J. B. Marcum.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Oct. 30, 1903

Little, Bev The Winchester Sun   Mon., 6-29-1931
Little, Bill Bill Little, a son of the notorious Jase Little, of Breathitt county, was shot and killed by Hiram Miller.

The Democrat, Wednesday, June 18, 1890

Little, Boyd The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-22-1938
Little, Brack The Winchester Sun,   Mon., 3-14-1921
Little, Bruce The Winchester Sun   Fri., 5-17-1929
Little, C. C. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-27-1939
Little, Calvin The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-27, 12-2-1925
Little, Charles The Winchester Sun Tues., 8-6-1912
Little, Charles E. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 11-11-1970
Little, Daniel City, County, State

At Richmond Thursday Rufus Todd was held over in $500 bond for killing Dan Little last week.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday October 15, 1897

 

Likely to be Acquitted.   The examining trial of Rufus Todd for the murder of Daniel Little was concluded Friday, at Richmond, Judge Burnam holding the prisoner over to the grand jury on $500 bind, which he promptly gave, and was released from custody. Defense put up a strong case, and it is the general opinion Todd will be acquitted at the final trial in December.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday October 19, 1897

 

Young Todd Indicted

Richmond, Ky., Dec. 10.—Young Rutherford Todd, the alleged slayer of Dan Littie, who was out on a $500 bond. Expecting upon an investigation by the grand jury to be acquitted, was, to the surprise of everybody, indicted by the grand jury Thursday afternoon for murder and a warrant for his arrest placed in the hands of the sheriff. It is said that evidence has been discovered very damaging to the accused.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, December 14, 1897

 

In the Richmond Circuit Court Saturday, Rutherford was acquitted of the killing of Dan Little some months ago. Todd is a brother of Will Todd, who is serving a life sentence for the murder of Matt Todd.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, September 20, 1898

Little, Daniel Boone The Winchester Sun   Mon., 7-19-1999
Little, Edward Hampton The Winchester Sun   Tues., 10-28-1941
Little, Edwin C. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 3-16-1920
Little, Elsberry Taken To The Pen

Sheriff Stamper, of Wolfe county passed through here Tuesday with Ingram Buckhanon, who was sent to the pen for life for killing his cousin, Elsberry Little, some months ago.   Buckhanon is only seventeen years old and is a cousin to James Buckhanon, who was hung some time ago for killing John Ross.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Feb. 4, 1902

Little, Ernest The Winchester Sun   Tues., 5-25-1937
Little, Floyd The Winchester Sun   Tues., 3-13-1917
Little, George Killing In Laurel County

While Deputy Sheriff Burt Casteel and his brother Charles were trying to arrest Charles Inman at the residence of George Little, in Laurel county, Little shot and fatally wounded the deputy. Casteel returned the fire as he fell, killing Little instantly. Inman made his escape.   Burt Casteel died a few years after the shooting.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., March 27, 1903

Little, Harrison B. The Winchester   Sun   Mon., 7-24-1933
Little, Hazel Pearl The Winchester Sun   Thur., 8-27, 8-28-1953
Little, Henry Clay The Winchester Sun   Wed., 10-9-1940
Little, Hiram Terror Of The Mountains.

Two Feudists Killed and Two Badly Wounded in a Fight.

Whitesburg, Ky., May 5.—On Beaver creek, near the Knott and Letcher county line, Hiram Little and “Bad Bill” Osborne were almost instantly killed and George and Henry Reedy and Boyd Cook badly wounded in a meeting of the Little, Cook and Osborne feudists. “Bad Bill” Osborne is credited with having killed ten men in his time and was the mountain terror. His son, Tom, says he wants to drink the heart’s blood of the survivors.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, May 9, 1902

Little, J. C. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 5-27-1961
Little, Jack WITH A RAZOR.

Niece of J. B. Marcum Committed Suicide near Jackson.

Jackson, Ky., Oct. 27.-Miss Belle Little, 24, committed suicide at Elktown, this county, by almost severing her head from the body with a razor. Her mother and sisters were in the adjoining room and, hearing a groan rushed in to find the pretty young suicide writhing in the agonies of death.   A note pined carefully in her hand told the tale of her unhappiness and gave her reasons for ending her life.   Miss Little was a niece of the late feud leader, J. B. Marcum, who was killed last May in the courthouse here while standing in the door with Capt. Ewen. Her father, Jack Little was killed four years ago in a fight by John Wilson, the latter being convicted of manslaughter and sentenced to serve three years in the penitentiary. He was recently released. During his confinement his wife obtained a divorce and was married to George Spencer, a son of Jailer William Spencer, of Breathitt county.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, October 30, 1903.

Little, James The Winchester Sun   Wed., 5-27-1925
Little, James Elmer The Winchester Sun   Thur., 12-19-1985
Little, Jere Jere Little, the famous Breathitt county outlaw and the slayer of a score of men was accidentally killed Monday, by a log rolling over him, breaking every bone in his body.   Little was the leader of the Little gang that terrorized Breathitt county for so long and the murderer of many a man is laid at his door. At his death he had twenty-six bullets in his body. In the last year or so Little had reformed, joined the church and was leading a peaceful life.—Mt. Sterling Gazette.

The Democrat, Friday, January 1, 1892.

Little, John The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-30-1929
Little, Joseph L. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 8-21-1962
Little, Junior The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-28, 5-1-1941
Little, Junior The Winchester Sun   Tues., 12-7, 12-8-1999
Little, Lewis A Long Term

At Prestonburg, Floyd county, John Hall was sentenced to ten years in the penitentiary for killing Lewis Little, and eighteen years for killing Joseph Cabell. Hall killed Little and when the posse went to arrest him a battle occurred in which Cabell was killed.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., March 20, 1906

Little, Lewis E. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-8, 10-9-1990
Little, Michael Courtney The Winchester Sun   Thur., 1-7-1926
Little, Mrs. Annie The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-4, 3-5-1968
Little, Mrs. Bertha The Winchester Sun   Sat., 8-27-1960
Little, Mrs. Dorothy Lee Rison The Winchester Sun   Fri., 3-16-1973
Little, Mrs. Dorothy Sue The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-21, 8-22-1989
Little, Mrs. Elizabeth Hylton The Winchester Sun   Tues., 6-26-1984
Little, Mrs. H. B. The Winchester Sun     Sat., 12-30-1933
Little, Mrs. John C. Died

At Paducah Thursday, Mrs. John C. Little died quite suddenly aged twenty-five years. She was the daughter of Judge J. C. Tully, formerly pastor of the Christian Church here.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., June 26, 1900

Little, Mrs. Juel The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-4, 3-5-1963
Little, Mrs. Kate The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-27-1925
Little, Mrs. Lillie E. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 4-12-1929
Little, Mrs. Marguerite Courtney The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-29-1967
Little, Mrs. Rosa The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-22-1957
Little, Nellie J. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-26-2001
Little, Orville Green The Winchester Sun   Fri., 3-7-1975
Little, P. L. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-20-1934
Little, Pierce The Winchester Sun,   Mon. 2-21-1921
Little, Robert (Bob) The Winchester Sun Thur., 7-9-1981
Little, Robert. E. J. H. Arnold, the murderer of Hon. Robt. E. Little, has made an assignment of his stock of dry goods, & C., valued at $20,000.

Clark County Democrat     Wed., 1-7-1879

 

The trial of James H. Arnold, the murderer of Hon. Robert E. Little, was called at Richmond last Thursday and after some discussion, a change of venue was granted and Versailles selected as the place, and next August the time for his trial.

Clark County Democrat Wed., 3-24-1880

 

James H. Arnold, who killed Robert Little, has retired from business in Kansas City, being nearly blind, writes Tipton, of the Richmond, Climax

The Democrat, Wednesday, September 9, 1891.

Little, Scott The Winchester Sun   Tues., 9-25-1928
Little, Thomas The Winchester Sun Tues., 8-6-1912
Little, Velma Gladys The Winchester Sun   Tues., 11-4-1997
Little, Webb Another killing took place in Breathitt county Monday over the ku klux outrages which have harassed that section. Gary Haddix, aged twenty-one years, had been instrumental in the indictment of some of the ku klux among whom was Webb Little, a local preacher. Little met Haddix and when the latter’s back was turned, drew his pistol and tried to shoot him. Haddix was too quick, however, and shot Little dead.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, April 2, 1897

Little, William D. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 12-18-1934
Little, Wm. Deaths

The remains of Wm. Little were buried at the White graveyard in the eastern part of the county Tuesday afternoon. Mr. Little formerly lived in this county but for a number of years his home was at Lowell, Ind.

The Sun-Sentinel   Thur., Aug. 24, 1905

Littlepage, B. Littlepage

Dr. B. Littlepage, aged 45, died at Clay City, last Friday.

The Winchester Sun-Sentinel Thursday, August 22, 1907

Littler, Mrs. Mary Lee The Winchester Sun   Wed., 12-11-2002
Littleton, Bryce Russell (B.R.) The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-20-1993
Littleton, Kenneth Paul The Winchester Sun   Fri., 3-10-1972
Littleton, Leroy The Winchester Sun   Tues., 6-5-1923
Littleton, Mrs. Bessie The Winchester Sun   Sat., 5-1-1920
Littleton, Oscar The Winchester Sun Sat., 3-29-1913
Litton, R. O. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-29-1915
Littral, Jesse The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-1-1968
Littral, John William The Winchester Sun   Tues., 8-1-1972
Littral, Mrs. Nancy Eldridge Cole The Winchester Sun   Wed., 1-5-1955
Littral, Mrs. Tommie Johnson The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-24, 2-25-1969
Littrell, Arthur W. (Art) The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-17, 9-18-1984
Littrell, J. M. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 1-24-1931
Littrell, John The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-25-1924
Littrell, John Wesley The Winchester Sun   Tues., 2-1, 2-2-1927
Littrell, Kenneth The Winchester Sun   Wed., 5-3, 5-4-2006
Littrell, Leon G The Winchester Sun   Wed., 11-8-1944
Littrell, Menifee S. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 6-24, 6-25-1982
Littrell, Morton E. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 3-24-1988
Littrell, Mrs. Ada Lee Hardy The Winchester Sun   Tues., 6-23, 6-24-1964
Littrell, Mrs. Amanda The Winchester Sun   Tues., 4-25-1950
Littrell, Mrs. Louisa The Winchester Sun   Sat., 2-15-1941
Littrell, Mrs. Mayo Scott The Winchester Sun   Tues., 2-16, 2-17-1988
Littrell, Nancy Byrd Jackson The Winchester Sun   Thur., 8-31-1995
Littrell, Obie The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-8-1965
Littrell, Robert V. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-21, 11-22-1960
Littrell, Wayland The Winchester Sun   Thur., 5-29, 5-30-1986
Littrell, William The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-25-1924
Littrell, William The Winchester Sun   Tues., 10-11, 10-12-1927
Littrell, William The Winchester Sun   Wed., 3-6-1929
Litts, Ford The Winchester Sun   Thur., 12-15-1932
Lively, Edwin The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-17, 11-18-1967
Lively, Harry Harry Lively died Monday morning at his home on West Washington Street. He had been in failing health for several months. For several years he was employed by the Allen Construction Company.

He is survived by a niece and nephew of Louisville.

Funeral services will be held Wednesday at 1:30 p.m. at the Haggard & Son Funeral Home.

The body is at the funeral home. Friends may call Tuesday afternoon.

THE WINCHESTER SUN. TUE. 10/27/1959.

Liver, J. Willis The Winchester Sun   Thur., 12-16-1943
Liver, John Capt. D. J. Pendleton was several days last week engaged in dividing the lands of the late John Liver, of Bourbon county.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, May 27, 1891

Liver, Mrs. Alma Rash The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-18, 11-19-1968
Liver, Mrs. Cora Died

Mrs. Cora Liver died Thursday at her home near Clintonville, aged forty-nine years.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., May 30, 1899

Livey, Sam E. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-12-1926
Livingood, Henry L. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 1-24-2003
Livingston, David The Winchester Sun   Tues., 8-3-1937
Livingston, William The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-23-1929
Livinney, James Order that Benjamin Taul, Henry Chiles, Samuel Whee and William Francis Guest are commissioners to settle with the administrators of James Livinney decd. and make report to court.

Order Book 4 P. 121 June 1806

Settlement with the administrators of James Livinney decd. ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 4 P. 111 September 1806

Lizer, Mrs. Iva Middleton The Winchester Sun   Fri., 5-18-1945
Llewallen, James Killed A Boy

Corbin, Ky., Aug., 5

The west end of Knox county is excited over the killing of James Llewallen, a 12-year-old boy, by James Hopper, and Hopper’s subsequent release by the local officers on the claim that they had no jurisdiction.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., August 8, 1899

Lloyd, Anna A brutal murder

A few days ago the body of a young white woman was found dead in the suburbs of Cincinnati, under conditions showing that she had been murdered under circumstances   of extreme brutality. The body was soon recognized as that of Miss Anna Lloyd, who     was Secretary of the Wilberg, Hanna Lumber Co. So much interest was manifested       that a reward of $2,500 was offered for the apprehension of her murderer. Several arrests were made, but no definite clues have been found. Monday night, Sam Reed, of Ford, telephoned Chief of Police McCord that a vagrant negro had come there that evening and secured something to eat at a negro house. He seemed very nervous and excited and while eating told the other negroes that he killed Miss Lloyd in Cincinnati and showed the knife with which he said the deed was done. The police here were warned to be on the lookout for him. He did not come this way but went toward Richmond. The police place little credence in what he said, thinking he was either boasting or was off his base mentally.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, January 7, 1910

Lloyd, Devar H. (Pat) The Winchester Sun   Fri., 10-11-1985
Lloyd, Elijah Adjudged A Lunatic

Elijah Lloyd, aged seventy-eight years, was tried before Judge Evans yesterday, adjudged a lunatic and ordered sent to the asylum. His hallucination took the form of peculiar religious views.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., May 15, 1900

Lloyd, Evan The Winchester News Thur., 1-25-1912
Lloyd, Joe Albert The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-16-1992
Lloyd, Mrs. Dorothy Jordan The Winchester Sun   Wed., 10-23-1991
Lloyd, Mrs. Hazel Lee Drake The Winchester Sun   Wed., 3-27-1985
Lloyd, Mrs. Maggie Cox Tolin The Winchester Sun   Wed., 4-22-1936
Lloyd, Mrs. N. B. Mrs. N. B. Lloyd, a prominent lady of Mt. Sterling, died Wednesday of cancer of the bowels.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., July 7, 1899

Lloyd, Priscilla J. Master commissioner to determine value of life estate of Priscilla J. Floyd and cause continued.

Order Book 14; P. 236; May Court 1871

Loane, Charles E. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 11-12-1924
Loar, Frank James Prince killed Frank Loar with a brick near Catlettsburg. The two had a row over a game of cards.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, May 22, 1894

Loar, Jas. Jas. Loar fell from the K. C. iron bridge at Paris Saturday, a distance of sixty feet, inflicting fatal injuries.

The Winchester Democrat     Wednesday, 9-20-1890

Loasby, Mrs. Elizabeth The Winchester Sun   Mon., 1-15-1973
Loasby, Thomas The Winchester Sun   Thur., 5-2-1974
Lobb, Elisha Fainted Near The Top

Greensburg, Ky., Aug. 22

At Oak Grove church Elisha Lobb was engaged in blasting out a well and after placing a charge of powder in position was being hauled up. Near the top he fainted and fell to the bottom, a distance of 35 feet.   He died later.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., August 28, 1900

Lock, Mrs. Maria The Winchester Sun Sat., 5-11-1912
Lockard, Ellen Irene The Winchester Sun   Tues., 8-18-1964
Lockard, Mrs. Sally The Winchester Sun   Thur., 2-10-1983
Lockart, Mrs. John The Winchester Sun   Fri., 1-30-1914
Locke, Ben The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-12, 11-13-1962
Locke, Billy A circus train was wrecked near Tyrone, Penn., Wednesday, killing five persons and severely injuring many more. A large number of horses and animals were killed, and a number of animals escaped to the hills. Billy Locke, a well known young man of Newport, this State, was among the killed. The loss of property will reach nearly two hundred thousand dollars.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, June 7, 1893

Locke, Mary Lee The Winchester Sun     Wed., 2-21, 2-22-1990
Locke, Nelson                         AA The Bourbon news says: “Nelson Locke, a noted negro character, who makes a living by picking up bits of coal, paper, rags, etc., died Tuesday, and was buried yesterday. It is claimed that he was 105 years old. It is said that one of his sons is about 75 years old. It is also said the aged darkey had accumulated several thousand dollars by small savings.”

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, March 6, 1896

Locke, Sam The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-9-1962
Locker, Victor The Winchester Sun   Wed., 12-19-1928, 1-31-1929
Lockett, Benjamin Revolutionary War Soldier

List of Revolutionary Soldiers Who Were Citizens Of Clark County, Kentucky

Compiled By Mrs. William D. Clark, Of Hart Chapter, D.A.R.

Chairman Of Revolutionary Soldiers Graves

Winchester, Clark County, Kentucky, Library

Research Room

Lockett, Will                       AA

(aka Petrie Kimbrough)

The Winchester Sun   Tues., 3-9, 3-24-1920
Lockhart, George C. Mr. G.C. Lockhart, the well known lawyer of Paris, who was taken to Cincinnati last week to have an operation performed for appendicitis, is in a precarious condition. When the physicians made an incision for the purpose of removing the vermicular appendix, it was discovered that Mr. Lockhart was suffering from a cancerous growth, and the operation could not be completed. He may die at any time and his life may be prolonged a year or two.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, March 10, 1896

 

George C. Lockhart dead

George C. Lockhart, of Paris, on of the best known lawyers of Central Kentucky, died at Cincinnati Monday afternoon at 5 o’clock. He had gone there to undergo an operation for appendicitis. After the operation was begun it was found that he was afflicted with a cancerous growth of the bowels and not appendicitis. Pneumonia intervened and he died in three days. He was forty-nine years old and leaves a wife and three daughters. His father was a native of Ireland and his mother was Miss Sarah Richardson, daughter of Marquis Richardson, of this county.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, March 13, 1896

Lockhart, Henry                   AA On Monday morning the steamer Leslie Combs struck at the mouth of Day Creek in the Kentucky river, about 120 miles above Frankfort, which making a hole in her bottom, she sunk in thirty feet of water. All on board were saved excepting the colored cook, Henry Lockhart. The boat was owned by parties in Ironton, Ohio and was valued at $4,000. A total loss, as there was no insurance.

The Clark County Democrat     Thur., 2-25-1872

Lockhart, J. F. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 4-19-1922
Lockhart, Matt Dropped Dead In Church

Barbourville, Ky., June 12

At the Smoky Creek Baptist Church, during services, Matt Lockhart, a prominent young farmer, dropped dead.   He had just announced his belief that he was saved when he fell over. He is said to have started to several in the building before services commenced that he was going to die. Heart trouble is given as the cause. Lockhart leaves a wife and one child.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., June 15, 1906

Lockhart, Mrs. Emma Pieratt The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-11-1961
Lockhart, Mrs. Ethel P. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 9-8-1987
Lockhart, Mrs. Orba Ellis The Winchester Sun   Wed., 11-22, 11-24, 11-25-2006
Lockhart, Sim The Winchester Sun   Fri., 4-15-1932
Lockland, Mrs. Lizzie Swartz The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-23-1957
Locklin, Mrs. Reatha Webb The Winchester Sun   Fri., 7-17-1987
Locknane, A. G. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-4, 11-25-1918
Locknane, C. S. A. F. Bowren Agent vs. C. S. Locknane’s Admin. ………..Appeals

………….continued…

Order Book 12; P. 73; November Court 1864

 

A.F. Bowren Agent vs. C. S. Locknane’s Admin.

……………continued

Order Book 12; P. 146; May Court 1865

Locknane, Carl Of unsound mind

Carl Locknane, son of William Locknane, aged twenty years, was tried Thursday afternoon before Judge Benton and a jury and adjudged to be of unsound mind and was sent to the Lexington Asylum. His mind appeared to be badly off on many themes and   no cause was assigned for his mental trouble.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, April 20, 1909

Locknane, Carlie B. The Winchester Sun Tues., 3-26-1912
Locknane, Charles Will Book 1, Page 91

Dated: January 6, 1857

Recorded: April, 1862

Locknane, Charles Deaths

Charles Locknane, a well-known and much respected citizen, died Saturday morning at his home on Jackson street, of stomach trouble, aged 70 years, two months and nineteen days.   He leaves a wife, formerly Miss Sallie Guy, six sons, John, Gus, Charlie, Jouett and Isaac, and two daughters, Cora and Laura. The funeral took place at the family residence Sunday morning with services by Elds. J. W. Harding and C. J. Armstrong. Burial in the Locknane graveyard on the Ruckerville pike.

The Sun-Sentinel   Thur., Jan. 28, 1904

Locknane, Charles S. Catherine Locknane vs. Elizabeth Rucker

Master Commissioner ordered to settle and adjust accounts and make deed conveying the interests of the heirs at law of Charles S. Locknane decd. to the purchasers Miles B. Locknane and Milton P. Locknane….action continued.

Order Book 14; P. 256; May Court 1871

 

Catherine Locknane vs. Elizabeth Rucker

Balance due to Miles B. Locknane and Milton P. Locknane …..from the estate of Charles S. Locknane decd…….

Order Book 14; P. 326 – 327; November Court 1871

Locknane, Charles S. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 1-17-1942
Locknane, Edward Otha Died—Monday afternoon, of brain trouble. Edward Otha, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Locknane, aged seven months. Burial at the cemetery, funeral services at the grave by Revs. S. W. Keene and L. D. Beck.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, May 4, 1894

Locknane, Gus Death of Gus Locknane

Gus Locknane died Friday of consumption at his home in the eastern part of this city, aged thirty-eight years. He leaves a wife, formerly Miss McKinney, and two children. He was a member of Miantonomo Tribe of Red Men at Lexington and he was buried in the Winchester cemetery under the auspices of the order, the funeral being held at the Church of Christ on Fairfax street with services by Eld. J.W. Harding.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, November 30, 1909

Locknane, Guy Huntington The Winchester Sun   Sat., 10-13-1951
Locknane, infant Died-On the 24th inst., of whooping cough, the infant child of John G. Locknane, aged about 8 months.

Clark County Democrat     Wed., 5-26-1880

Locknane, Isaac B. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 9-13-1968
Locknane, J. L. J. L. Locknane executor vs. G. P. Ramsey & co.

Action be revived in the name of J. G. & Samuel Locknane executors of J. L. Locknane decd.

Order Book 18; P. 25; November Court 1881

Locknane, James Death of Jas. Locknane

Jas. Locknane died of consumption, Friday afternoon, at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Locknane, on College street. The remains were buried in the Winchester cemetery, Saturday afternoon, with services at the grave by Rev. C.E. Crafton. The following officiated as pall bearers: W.P. Azbill, John N. Bush, R.F. Scobee, Tebbs Dudley, A.G. Locknane, and John W. Harding. The deceased was a young man of high standing in the community and had many friends.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, June 28, 1910

Locknane, James H. Age 14 days, he was born in Clark County, KY, his parents were Charles and Catharine Locknane, he died in Clark County, KY, August 14, 1852 of malformed heart.

CCKD

Locknane, James M. Badly Hurt By A Fall

Jas. M. Locknane fell from a wagon of tobacco Friday and was very badly hurt. He was unconscious when found and has remained so most of the time since. The physicians say he has concussion of the brain and his recovery is very doubtful.

Later: His death occurred yesterday afternoon, and up to the hour of going to press no funeral arrangements had been made.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Jan. 20, 1903

 

Death of James M. Locknane

Mr. James M. Locknane died at his residence on West Broadway Monday afternoon as the result of an accident. At seven p. m. Friday, he was on a wagon loaded with tobacco. He was making a turn on Winn Avenue to Foster’s warehouse, when the wagon slided around on the ice and he was precipitated on the pike, striking his head. He remained unconscious until the time of his death. He leaves a wife, formerly Miss Mize and four children, three small boys and Mrs. Dollie Nelson, of Washington D. C. He carried a life insurance of $3,000. He had many noble traits of character. The burial will take place this morning at 10 o’clock.   Services at the grave in our cemetery by Revs. Armstrong and Lowry.

Winchester Sentinel   Wed., Jan. 21, 1903

 

Burial of J. M. Locknane

The remains of Jas. M. Locknane, who died Monday afternoon, were buried Wednesday in the Winchester cemetery, services at the grave being conducted by Revs. J. A. Francis and C. J. Armstrong. He leaves a wife, formerly Miss Mize, of Powell county, and four children, Mrs. Chas. B. Nelson, of Washington D. C., James, William and Bush Locknane, of this city.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Jan. 23, 1903

 

Mr. and Mrs. B. R. Locknane were called to Winchester on Tuesday by the death of his eldest brother, J. M. Locknane, of that city. This is the second brother Mr. Locknane has lost by death within ten months.   Paris Democrat

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Jan. 27, 1903

 

Prompt Adjustment

Jesse A. Ramsey, Record Keeper of Winchester Tent No. 22, Maccabees, paid on Feb. 16th to Mrs. J. M. Locknane a policy of $3,000 being amount of insurance held by Mr. Locknane in the order. Mr. Locknane’s death occurred on Jan. 19th, and this prompt adjustment shows the stability of this well known order.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Feb. 24, 1903

Locknane, James Marshall The Winchester Sun   Wed., 4-26-1972
Locknane, James T. Death of James T. Locknane—We regret to learn of the death of James T. Locknane, which occurred at his residence at 3 o’clock last evening. Mr. Locknane’s health had been declining for more than a year, but it has only been within the last month that his friends despaired of his recovery. He was born in Clark county, and at the time of his death was among the oldest native born citizens of the county. Though it is allotted to same to attain a much greater age, Mr. Locknane had well nigh lived out his three score and ten, being at the time of his death in his seventieth year. Beginning life with few advantages, by force of character and enterprise he became prominent among the citizens of the county. He was a farmer, and took a deep interest in stock raising and in the business of agriculture generally. Earnest and decided in his convictions, no one had to guess at his opinions. He loved his friends, and was always true to what he conceived to be the best interest of his country. In his religion persuasions he was a firm believer in the doctrine and usage’s of the Christian church. His funeral will take place at his residence this evening at 2 o’clock.   Services by Rev. H. T. Wilson.

Clark County Democrat     Wed., 6-30-1880

 

Will Book 1, Page 363

Dated: September 29, 1875

Recorded: July 26, 1880

 

In the death of James T. Locknane, which took place last Tuesday evening, Clark county has lost one of her most valued citizens. He had been in ill health for a long time, and all hopes of his recovery had been given up for several weeks ago. Kind and loving relatives and friends ministered to him during his long and painful illness, and smoothed his pillow in his last hours. At the time of his death he was seventy years of age.   He was born in Clark county, and spent the whole of his life within her borders. His funeral was preached at his residence at 2 o’clock Wednesday evening, by Eld. J. W. Harding.

The Semi-Weekly Sun     Fri., 7-2-1880

 

Petrified Body.

Samuel Locknane recently sold his farm to a Madison county woman and one of the terms of the trade was that Mr. Locknane should remove the bodies of several members of the family who had been buried in the yard. In consequence the bodies of Jas. T. Locknane and wife, Mrs. T. J. Bush and others were taken up and reinterred in the cemetery. The body of Mrs. Bush had been buried more than a third of a century but was remarkably well preserved and in the opinion of many, was petrified. The clothing and even a flower in her hand were intact.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, August 19, 1898

Locknane, Jeff Jeff Locknane died Friday, march 7th, at his home in Denton county, Texas, of pneumonia, aged fifty-nine years. He was a native of this county but went to Texas twenty-nine years ago where he had since lived. He leaves a wife, formerly Miss Annie Sneed, of this county, and four sons all grown, and two of them married. One brother, Miles B. Locknane, and four sisters, Mrs. Mrs. Martha Tapp, Mrs. Nannie Johnson, Mrs. Xantippe Green and Mrs. Julia Eidson, all of this county, survive him.

He was a gallant soldier in Morgan’s command, being a member of the company commanded by Capt. Levi Wheeler.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, March 18, 1902

Locknane, Jesse The Winchester Sun   Wed., 4-20, 4-21-1938
Locknane, John THE WAR OF 1812 – Private

The Roll of Two Companies Raised in Clark County by Capt. James Sympson

Capt. James Sympson’s Company of Kentucky Mounted Volunteers, August 25th 1813.

The Semi-Weekly Sun     Fri., 2-21-1879

Locknane, John Ordered that Nancy Dogein give additional home as guardian for Charles G. and Elya Ann Locknane infant orphans of John Locknane decd. with Francis Smith and David Rainey security.

Order Book 10; P.75; May Court 1832

Locknane, John G. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 5-21, 5-22-1914
Locknane, John Gordon Lovely child dead

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Locknane, Jr., have the sympathy of all their friends in the death         of their beautiful little son, John Gordon, who died at an early hour Thursday morning, aged seven months. He contracted whooping cough about two weeks ago and other complications setting in, caused its death. The interment will be in the Winchester cemetery this morning at 9:30 o’clock with services at the grave by Elds. J.W. Harding and M.P. Lowry.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, June 18, 1909

Locknane, John M. Died—At the Lexington Lunatic Asylum, Wednesday, of hemorrhage of the lungs, John M. Locknane, aged seventy-one years. He was raised in this county and lived here most of his life. He left here and went to Oregon where he resided for quite a while; he came back to this county a few years ago. His mind gradually failed and last April he was sent to the asylum. He leaves two children, W. R. Locknane, of this county, and Mrs. Judge Bamford White, of Irvine.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, January 11, 1898

Locknane, John W. John W. Locknane, better known as “Cudge” was badly and it is thought fatally hurt, yesterday. He was riding a young horse and on meeting a cart near this city, he got off to prevent his being thrown, The mule attached to the cart, which belonged to one of the Tarbee boys, became frightened and ran over him, crushing his skull.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, April 22,1891

Locknane, John W. Death of John W. Locknane.

At an early hour Friday morning, John W. Locknane, or “Stumpy John,” as he was familiarly known died at his home on the Ruckerville pike of consumption, aged fifty-two years. He leaves a wife, formerly Miss Mollie Storms, but no children. He also leaves three brothers, James M. Locknane, of this city, Dock Locknane, of Bath; four sisters, Mrs. Eliza Burgher, Mrs. Lula Burgher and Mrs. Marion McKinney, of this county, and Mrs. Celia Wells, of Powell county.

The funeral was preached Sunday at the residence by Eld. J. W. Harding and the remains were buried in the Winchester cemetery. He was a good citizen and his death is greatly regretted.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, March 18, 1902

 

Wills Probated. A number of wills were probated in the County Court Monday as follows:

J. W. Locknane, “Stumpy John.” Left all his property absolutely to his wife, Mollie Locknane, who he said, had helped him to make and save all of it.

A. J. Kimbrell left all his property to his son, Brutus Clay Kimbrell.

Andrew Mitchell, colored, left his personal property to his wife, Anna Mitchell absolutely.

He also devised his house and lot in Schollsville to her for lie and at her death to his son Sam Mitchell.

James Carter, colored, left a house and a thirty-two foot lot, in Kohlhassville to his son, David Carter; to his son Wash Carter, an eighteen foot lot adjoining the former.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, March 28, 1902

Locknane, John W. John W. Locknane, a well known citizen of this county, died Monday evening at the home of Rev. M.P. Lowry, aged sixty-four, of pneumonia. He was buried at the old family burying ground at John Greenings, funeral services by Eld. J.W. Harding. His wife formerly Miss Ellen Muir died four years ago.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, January 31, 1896

Locknane, Jouett M. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 4-13-1965
Locknane, Lucille The Winchester Sun   Sat., 4-2-1927
Locknane, Miles The Winchester Sun   Sat., 2-7-1914
Locknane, Miles B. Death of Miles B. Locknane

Miles B. Locknane died Saturday about noon at his home on Buckner street, of a complication of diseases, aged sixty-two years. He leaves a wife but no children. The following officiated as pall bearers: Jas. Tapp, Charles Johnson, George Ragland, W.J. Rucker, Price Green and Pullman Ragland.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, June 28, 1910

 

County court

The session of Judge Evan’s County court was a very brief one yesterday. The will         of Miles B. Locknane was offered for probate, and was continued, both the attesting witnesses being dead.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, July 26, 1910

 

County court items

W.P. Ragland qualified as executor under the will of M.B. Locknane, with D.B. Hampton, Geo. J. Ballard and Jerry Reeves appraisers of the estate. Mrs. Mary McClure waived her right to administer on the estate of her late husband, John W. McClure, and on her motion J. Mark McClure was appointed.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, August 19, 1910

Locknane, Miles B. The last will and testament of Miles B. Locknane was produced in court and proven according to law by the oaths of James H. G. Bush and Samuel Hanson witnesses thereto subscribed and also the codicil thereto annexed was also proven by the oath of said James H. G. Bush a witness thereto subscribed and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 12; P. 35; July Court 1847

 

On the motion of James T. Locknane the executor named in the last will and testament of Miles B. Locknane dec. who made oath thereto as the laws directs certificate is granted him for obtaining a probate thereof in due form giving security whereupon he together with Charles Locknane and Reuben Rucker entered into and acknowledged their bond in the penalty of $4000 conditioned as the law directs.

Order Book 12; P. 38; July Court 1847

 

Ordered that Reuben Franklin, James Rutledge James Quisenberry and William Adams or any three of them after being first sworn do appraise in current money the slaves if any and personal estate of Miles B. Locknane dec. and make report thereof to the court.

Order Book 12; P. 39; July Court 1847

 

Sale bill of the estate of Miles B. Locknane dec. was produced in court approved of and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 12; P. 92; April Court 1848

 

Settlement with the executor of Miles B. Locknane dec. was produced in court and ordered to be filed…………

Order Book 12; P. 186; February Court 1849

 

James T. Locknane executor of Miles B. Locknane dec. …….William Pigg on an appeal, continued..

Order Book; P. 324; October Court 1850

 

Miles B. Locknane exec settlement- produced in court ……..continued for objections and exceptions.

Order Book 12; P. 378; June Court 1851

 

Miles B. Locknane Exec. settlement- no objections ………approved ……..recorded.

Order Book 12; P. 383; July Court 1851

 

Ordered that A. L. Haggard be appointed guardian of the estate of John W. Locknane infant orphan of Miles B. Locknane whereupon he together with D. T. Haggard entered into …………….penalty of $2000 ……..

Order Book 12; P. 404; September Court 1851

 

Ordered that A. L. Haggard be appointed guardian of the estate of Charles S. Locknane infant orphan of Miles B. Locknane whereupon he together with D. T. Haggard entered into …………….penalty of $2000 ……..

Order Book 12; P. 405; September Court 1851

 

Ordered that A. S. Allan be appointed guardian of the estate of Miles B. Locknane infant orphan of Miles B. Locknane dec. whereupon he together with John B. Huston entered into and acknowledge bond in the penalty of $2000 conditioned as the law directs.

Order Book 12; P. 410; October Court 1851

 

Ordered that A. S. Allen be appointed guardian of the estate of Jane Locknane infant orphan of Miles B. Locknane ……with James T. Locknane……entered ….bond in penalty of $2000 …….

Order Book 12; P. 454; March Court 1852

 

Ordered that A. S. Allen be appointed guardian of the estate of Nancy Locknane infant orphan of Miles B. Locknane ……with James T. Locknane……entered ….bond in penalty of $2000 …….

Order Book 12; P. 454; March Court 1852

 

Ordered that John W. Locknane be appointed guardian of the estate of Jane Locknane infant orphan of Miles B. Locknane dec. ……..security with James T. Locknane ……..bond in penalty of $2000 …….A. S. Allen her former guardian being present and consenting thereto.

Order Book 12; P. 475; June 1852

 

Ordered that John W. Locknane be appointed guardian of the estate of Nancy Locknane infant orphan of Miles B. Locknane dec. ……..security with James T. Locknane ……..bond in penalty of $2000 …….A. S. Allen her former guardian being present and consenting thereto.

Order Book 12; P. 475; June 1852

 

John W. Locknane guardian of Nancy and Jane Locknane came personally into court and reported on the estate in his hands as such guardian.

Order Book 12; P.490; September Court 1852

 

A. L. Haggard guardian of John W. and Charles S. Locknane ……….this day appear in court ……report no estate in his hands as such guardian.

Order Book 12; P. 494; September Court 1852

 

Satisfactory proof being made…that no estate came into the hands of A. S. Locknane as guardian of   Nancy and Jane Locknane infant orphans of Miles B. Locknane dec. by consent John W. Locknane …appointed their guardian and said Allan is hereby released as such guardian and costs of said Allan shall be paid by the present guardian.

Order Book 12; P. 555; April Court 1853

 

Settlement with the guardian of Jane Locknane was produced …..filed.

Order Book 12; P. 556; April Court 1853

 

Settlement with the guardian of Nancy Locknane was produced …..filed.

Order Book 12; P. 556; April Court 1853

 

Settlement with the guardian of Jane and Nancy Locknane being filed ….again produced …..approved …..recorded.

Order Book 12; P. 557; May Court 1853

 

Settlement with the guardian of Charles S. Locknane was produced ……filed.

Order Book 12; P. 566; June Court 1853

Again produced….approved……recorded.

Order Book 12; P. 572; July Court 1853

 

Ct. vs. A. S. Allan as guardian of Miles B. Locknane on summons contd.

Order Book 12; P. 590; September Court !853

 

John W. Laughlin guardian Petition for sale of land

Net value, estate of infant petitioner Nancy Locknane ….

Order Book 8; P. 372; May Court 1855

 

Jane Locknane –petition for sale of slave Nelson

Order Book 8; P. 398; May Court 1855

 

Miles B. Locknane vs. William Jones & wife

……….ordered that this cause be redocketed and that A. H. Buckner execute deeds of partition according to the allotment in commissioner’s report.

Order Book 10; P. 334; May Court 1860

 

M. B. Locknane vs. William Jones & wife ………..Equity

…….papers be filed away………

Order Book 10; P. 398; July Court 1860

 

Miles B. Locknane’s heirs vs. William Jones & wife ……….Equity

………….a deed of   conveyance to Jane Locknane ….approved ……certified for record.

…….a deed of conveyance to John W. Locknane ……..approved ……certified for record.

Order Book 10; P. 482; November Court 1860

 

Miles B. Locknane’s heirs vs. William Jones & wife …….Equity

…….a deed of conveyance to Miles B. Locknane Jr. ….approved …certified for record.

……..a deed of   conveyance to Charles S. Locknane Jr. ……………….approved ……….certified for record.

…….a deed of conveyance to Nancy Locknane …approved …..certified for record.

Order Book 10; P. 483; November Court 1860

Locknane, Mrs. Belle Died—At her home in Clay City, Saturday night. Mrs. Belle Locknane, wife of George Locknane. She was a Miss Burgher, before her marriage, and has two brother, Will and Ben Burgher, residing in this city. They with J. M. Locknane and wife. Dock Locknane and wife attended the funeral there yesterday.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, December 10, 1895

 

Chilton

Rev. Z. W. Pigg has been called by the church at Corinth for the next year. This is the fifth call at this place. He was also called upon to preach the funeral of Mrs. Geo. Locknane, of Clay City, Tuesday.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, December 13, 1895

Locknane, Mrs. Bobbie Jane The Winchester Sun   Mon., 1-24-1944
Locknane, Mrs. Catherine Middle Four-Mile; Died—On the11th, Inst. at her residence on East Four-Mile of flux Mrs. Catherine Locknane. Funeral services Sunday at 10 o’clock and interment in the family burying ground.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, August 16, 1893

 

Tulip; James W. Gordon of Lexington, was here Sunday attending the funeral of his sister, Mrs. Catherine Locknane.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, August 16, 1893

Locknane, Mrs. Florence Mize The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-18-1946
Locknane, Mrs. G. W. The remains of the late Mrs. G.W. Locknane were on Sunday last removed from the     old burial ground, adjoining the city, to the church cemetery at Powell Valley. The proposition to secure additional ground and to lay off a new cemetery has been discussed at various times, but the delay and uncertainty attending the movement are such that Mr. Locknane decided upon the removal of the body to the church where Mrs. Locknane formerly held membership. – Clay City Chronicle.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, March 17, 1896

Locknane, Mrs. George Those who attended the funeral of Mrs. George Locknane at Salt Lick Friday were       Mr. and Mrs. Luther Hamilton, Mr. and Mrs. Marion McKinney, and Miss Ida Wells.   Mr. Locknane is an uncle of Mr. L.S. Hamilton and Mrs. Gordon Stevenson, of this city.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, January 25, 1910

 

Brought here for burial

Mrs. G.W. Locknane died Thursday, January 20th, at her home at Salt Lick, of consumption, aged thirty-five years. The remains were brought to this city and buried in the Winchester cemetery Saturday.

The Winchester Democrat Tuesday, January 25, 1910

Locknane, Mrs. John W. DEATHS   Saturday, at Hunt, of pneumonia, Mrs. John W. Locknane, aged 65 years.

The Democrat, Wednesday, December 16, 1891.

Locknane, Mrs. Julia B. Died In Lexington

Mrs. Julia B. Locknane, wife of John Locknane, died Sunday at her home in Lexington, of consumption, aged thirty-three years. She was formerly Miss Overly, and resided here until a short time ago. She leaves a husband and two little children.   The remains were taken to Elizaville for interment.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., April 23, 1901

Locknane, Mrs. Laura Lawrence The Winchester Sun   Wed., 5-3-1978
Locknane, Mrs. Lenora Chandler The Winchester Sun   Mon., 1-9-1995
Locknane, Mrs. Lyda Kinney The Winchester Sun   Fri., 1-20, 1-21-1978
Locknane, Mrs. Mary Lee The Winchester Sun   Fri., 5-4, 5-5-1934
Locknane, Mrs. Mary Ramsey The Winchester Sun   Thur., 6-7-1956
Locknane, Mrs. Ruth Warfield The Winchester Sun   Wed., 4-26-1972
Locknane, Mrs. Sallie The Winchester Sun   Tues., 10-15-1940
Locknane, Mrs. Susan F. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 1-24-1929
Locknane, Mrs. Vertner Garner The Winchester Sun   Fri., 3-25-1949
Locknane, Mrs. Wesley Wills

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Burgher attended the burial of the latter’s mother, Mrs. Wesley Locknane, at Clay City, last week.

The Sun-Sentinel   Thur., Sept. 29, 1904

Locknane, Pat The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-11, 4-14-1932
Locknane, Polly Ann (Aunt) The Winchester Sun   Sat., 4-15-1916
Locknane, Reuben Died—Thursday, of diphtheria, Reuben, the three-year-old son of W. R Locknane.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, October 1, 1895

 

In Memory of Little Reuben

Reuben, second son of W. E. and Susan Locknane, closed his earthly career on the 26th day of September, 1895. He was born on the 13th day of February 1893. Hence had passed three springs and summers and was reaching out after the third winter. Wholly unexpected, Death reached out his icy hand and bade the little prattler lay off his earthly robes and join the swelling army that makes up the congregation that is to extend through all time. This little fellow was remarkably mild and gentle. A few days before his death the writer was with him. When he left he reached out his hand and bid him good-bye. Little did we think this was the last time we would see little Reuben. We extend to the bereaved parents and family our warmest and deepest sympathy. We invite them to look the Author of All-Life in their bereavement. They will find solace in the exceedingly precious promises of God’s words. “The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away. Blessed be the name of the Lord.” This denotes resignation. In the language of the sweet singer of Israel let them say, “We cannot bring him back but we can go to him.” Paul in his divine eloquence, would quiet the troubled breast. “Sorrow not as those that have no hope, for if we believe that Jesus died and rose again, then also that sleep in Jesus will God bring with him.” “As in Adam all die even so in Christ shall all be made alive.”

His little hands we gently folded on his breast

Fully believing his soul was at rest

To his redeemed spirit we would say

Wait for us until the Resurrection day

You we desire to meet

Bade at the Master’s feet.     J. H. Baker

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, October 29, 1895

Locknane, Richard David The Winchester Sun   Wed., 6-29-1932
Locknane, Sam The Winchester Sun   Sat., 2-23-1924
Locknane, Smith The Winchester Sun Mon., 6-18-1979
Locknane, Sydney A. Age 11 days, male, he was born in Clark County, KY, his parents were Charles and Catharine Locknane, he died in Clark County, KY, August 11, 1852 of malformed heart.

CCKD

Locknane, Wes Locknane – Uncle Wes Locknane died at his old home near Clay City Friday night of pneumonia.   He leaves two sons and three daughters, Dock and George and Mrs. Wack Burgher, Mrs. Marion McKinney and Mrs. George Wills. He was one of the oldest men in Powell county and his friends here are sorry to hear of his death.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Feb. 9, 1906

Locknane, William Goebel The Winchester Sun   Sat., 7-9, 7-11-1977
Locknane, William N. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 8-13-1948
Locknane, William R. Proved fatal

William R. Locknane, who was shot Wednesday afternoon by R. Hood Curtis died Thursday at Lexington

When W.R. Locknane was shot Wednesday evening by R. Hood Curtis he was placed in an automobile and taken at once to Lexington where an operation was performed in the hope of saving his life. It was found that the intestines had been perforated several times and it was recognized at once that his condition was very critical. All was done that could be done but he grew steadily worse and shortly after noon on the following day he died. The remains were brought here on the afternoon train and taken to his home in the country where the funeral was preached Friday morning by Eld. J.W. Harding, and the remains were buried in the Winchester cemetery. Shortly after the shooting Curtis came in, surrendered, and was admitted to bail in the sum of $750.00 which he readily gave. As soon as the authorities here were notified, a writ, charging murder, was issued and Curtis was again arrested. In such cases bail cannot be allowed until the examining trial is held and Curtis has since been in the hands of an officer. It is said that before his death Locknane made a dying statement, but the tenor of the statement has not been given out. His attorney, J.M. Stevenson, claimed self defense. According to law either the authorities of the county in which the shooting is done or those of the county in which the victim dies, may assume jurisdiction, and a warrant for the arrest of Curtis was issued at Lexington. Judge Evans promptly assured the Lexington authorities that Clark county had already assumed jurisdiction and the matter was dropped at Lexington. The examining trial of Curtis for the murder was begun before Judge Evans yesterday morning, and consumed most of the day. Curtis was represented by John M. Stevenson and Frank H. Haggard, while County Attorney S.A. Jeffries, was assisted in the prosecution by Locknane’s brother-in-law, Ex-Congressman J. Bamford White, of Irvine. At the hour of going to press the trial had not been concluded.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, May 18, 1909

 

Mrs. J.B. White, of Irvine, attended the funeral of her brother, Wm. R. Locknane, Friday.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, May 18, 1909

 

Warrant dismissed

R. Hood Curtis was before Judge Evans Monday charged with the murder of Will R. Locknane. After an investigation which consumed nearly the entire day, Judge Evans dismissed the warrant and set Curtis at liberty. This action does not prevent the grand jury from taking action on the matter if it so desires.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, May 21, 1909

 

Miss Patsey Bush attended the funeral of her cousin, W.R. Locknane at Winchester

on Friday.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, May 28, 1909

Lockridge, Frank M. Jr. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 4-1-1999
Lockridge, Frank Murphy The Winchester Sun   Tues., 12-29-1998
Lockridge, Mrs. Alice Courtney

Cannon

The Winchester Sun   Wed., 8-18-1999, Mon., 8-30-1999
Lockridge, Mrs. Mary L. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-14-1913
Lockridge, Mrs. Mary Winn The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-27-1939
Lockridge, Robert Brice Horne Dismissed

Louisville, Ky., March 31

J. H. Horne, the college coach, who accidentally killed his friend, Robert Bruce Lockridge, while throwing the hammer Saturday, was given an examining trial in the police court Monday morning. Horne was dismissed.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., April 3, 1903

Lockwood, Laikyn Dawn Caudill The Winchester Sun   Thur., 8-12-2010
Lockwood, Mark Edwin The Winchester Sun   Wed., 10-10-1973
Loeb, Gus Buford Overton, who murdered Gus Loeb and his wife about three months ago in Harlan county for which he was in jail under sentence to be hung, escaped Friday night with the aid of outside parties. He was to have been hung October 18th.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, September 17, 1895

 

Buford Overton was hung at Harlan Court house, Monday, for the murder of Gus Loeb and wife, a couple of peddlers who were waylaid and killed a year ago by Buford and Billy Overton and John Scott; Billy Overton was killed while resisting arrest. Buford escaped from jail but was recaptured and sentenced to death. He denied complicity even on the scaffold, but just as the cap was drawn over his face he acknowledged that he killed the old woman with his own hand.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, October 16, 1896

Loeb, Mrs. Gus Buford Overton, who murdered Gus Loeb and his wife about three months ago in Harlan county for which he was in jail under sentence to be hung, escaped Friday night with the aid of outside parties. He was to have been hung October 18th.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, September 17, 1895

 

Buford Overton was hung at Harlan Court house, Monday, for the murder of Gus Loeb and wife, a couple of peddlers who were waylaid and killed a year ago by Buford and Billy Overton and John Scott; Billy Overton was killed while resisting arrest. Buford escaped from jail but was recaptured and sentenced to death. He denied complicity even on the scaffold, but just as the cap was drawn over his face he acknowledged that he killed the old woman with his own hand.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, October 16, 1896

Loeb, R. Death of R. Loeb, of Paducah.

Paducah, Ky., March 8.—Mr. R. Loeb, aged 67 years, died from general debility, after two years’ illness. He was born in Germany. He was a member of the wholesale liquor firm of Loeb, Bloom & Co., and was one of the wealthiest men of Paducah.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, March 14, 1902

Loesch, Clara Girl Shot Dead in Her Room.

Louisville, Ky., Aug. 2.—Miss Clara Loesch, a beautiful young girl of 18 years, a clerk in a store in Parkland, a suburb of this city was shot by burglars at midnight and instantly killed. She slept in a room over the store with the family of the proprietor. Two men raised her window and when she leaped out of bed to run they shot her with a double-barreled shotgun, taking effect in her breast. The men are supposed to have been burglars, though some believe they came here to kill the girl. No one saw the men.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, August 9, 1898

 

Accused Of Murder.

Robert Weber, an Eighteen-Year-Old Boy, Shot Miss Loesch—The Affair is Shrouded in Mystery.

Louisville, Ky., Aug. 3.—Robert Weber, the eighteen-year-old son of the woman who employed Miss Clara Loesch, Tuesday confessed that he had shot and killed the young lady and that the shot was not fired by burglars, as was at first supposed. While the affair is still shrouded in some mystery, the best obtainable evidence is to the effect that two Negro burglars got into the house Tuesday midnight and that Weber killed Miss Loesch while firing at them. The window shutter was cut and goods taken from the store were found two miles away, traced there by bloodhounds. Miss Loesch sprang from her bed when she heard the burglars and ran toward the door of young Weber’s room. He had heard the noise and in the darkness fired a shotgun through the open door just as the girl was rushing toward him. He was arrested and charged with murder.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, August 9, 1898

 

Sued For Damages.

Louisville, Ky., Sept. 7.—Robert Weber has filed suit for $5,000 damages against C. Barfield for saying he was guilty of cold-blooded murder when he killed Clara Loesch several weeks ago. The girl was employed at his mother’s grocery. One night she arose to ascertain the cause of a noise, and was shot and killed by Weber, who is 19 years old. He claimed it was an accident and was acquitted at the examining trial.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, September 13, 1898

Lofton, Kameron The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-29-2008
Loftus, Cecil                         AA The Winchester Sun   Tues., 8-16, 8-18-1921
Logan, Bena                         AA PAID THE PENALTY

Tom Hayden Hanged Monday Morning at Hartford, Ky., for the Murder of Bena Logan.

HARTFORD, Ky., July 12.-Tom Hayden was hanged here at 10:30 o’clock Monday morning for the murder of Bena Logan last October. An immense crowd was in attendance, it being the first hanging in Ohio county since 1826. Hayden had intended to play “Home, Sweet Home” on the harmonica on the scaffold, but broke down. Hayden, who was a mulatto and a miner by occupation, and 26 years of age, killed Bena Logan, a colored girl, whose company he had been keeping, at Render mines, in October of last year. The killing, according to the evidence, was unprovoked. Hayden, having shot the girl down in cold blood because of her refusal to allow him to accompany her on a visit she was about to make to a neighbor.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, July 19, 1898.

Logan, Carl The Winchester Sun   Thur., 4-2-1987
Logan, Carl D. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 11-24-1951
Logan, Caswell S. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 4-29-1960
Logan, Charles A. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 7-5-1955
Logan, Cornelius Allen The Winchester Sun Tues., 8-11-1981
Logan, Craig Vance The Winchester Sun   Tues., 8-19, 8-20, 8-21-1969
Logan, D. B. Jr. The Winchester Sun Mon., 6-9, 6-11-1913
Logan, D. C. Satisfied that he did not take his own life, as circumstances indicated, the family of the late Mr. D. C. Logan of Lexington, have offered a reward of $2,000 for the arrest and conviction of his assassin or assassins.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, January 25, 1895

Logan, daughter At Williamstown Wednesday, Thomas Logan was convicted of the murder of his daughter and given two years in the penitentiary for the crime. The facts showed he had at various times brutally beat her and had made her go out in the cold last winter until she was badly frozen.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, May 24, 1895

Logan, Dick Arrested For Murder

Hickman, Ky., March 3

Earl Stewart, colored, who killed Dick Logan February 22, was arrested by Sheriff George Carpenter near Fulton, Ky., the scene of the crime. Stewart, who is only 16 years old, was placed in jail here.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., March 3, 1903

Logan, Emily Chrisman The Winchester Sun   Tue., 11-18-1975
Logan, Harvey Dudley The Winchester Sun   Sat., 11-15-1997
Logan, Henry The Winchester Sun   Thur., 10-20-1921
Logan, J. V. Dies in the west

Prof. J.V. Logan, for many years president of Old Centre College, Richmond, died this week at Monticello, Minn. The burial was at Richmond, Wednesday.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, August 14, 1908

Logan, J. V. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 2-19-1942
Logan, James Everett The Winchester Sun Wed., 2-28, 3-1-2007
Logan, James Thomas The Winchester Sun   Wed., 7-20-1932
Logan, James W. Sr. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-10-1995
Logan, Jane Miss Jane Logan, died this week at Danville, age 84 years. She had been totally blind for 70 years.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, March 27,1891

Logan, Jas. Jr. At Cynthiana, Henry Wills was found guilty of killing Jas. Logan, Jr., of Leesburg, and sent up for seven years.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, September 20, 1893

Logan, Joe The Winchester Sun   Tues., 2-12-1918
Logan, Lewis V. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 3-31, 4-1-1976
Logan, Lucian Mr. John E. Bean and Miss Lelia Croxton attended the burial of Lucian Logan at Danville Monday. Mr. Logan’s wife was Miss Anna Croxton, a daughter of Gen. John T. Croxton, and has numerous relatives in this county.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., March 9, 1900

Logan, M. A. Jr. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 7-5-1944
Logan, Marshall A. Jr. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 7-6-1949
Logan, Marshall Abraham Jr. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 7-7-1943
Logan, Marshall Jr. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 7-3-1948
Logan, Mrs. Adele Saufley The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-19, 10-20-1942
Logan, Mrs. Elizabeth Smith The Winchester Sun   Thur., 2-4-1982
Logan, Mrs. Fannie Brown The Winchester Sun   Wed., 7-19-1944
Logan, Mrs. J. V. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 7-28-1924
Logan, Mrs. Jenny V. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 7-5-1952
Logan, Mrs. Lewie Crawford The Winchester Sun   Thur., 3-21-1963
Logan, Mrs. Margaret Died

Mrs. Margaret Logan died suddenly of heart disease, at the home of her son, Dr. W. B. Logan, of Shelbyville, Thursday morning. She formerly lived in Virginia but for a number of years has resided with her son at whose home she died.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., April 9, 1901

Logan, Mrs. Margaret Free Delivery For Versailles

Versailles, Ky., May 26

The will of Miss Margaret Logan, who died last week in Florida, was probated here Monday afternoon.   She leaves, besides her estate, $20,000 for the establishment of a free public library at Versailles.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., May 29, 1903

Logan, Mrs. Mattie At Nicholasville Tuesday, Mrs. Mattie Logan, wife of Prof. J. L. Logan of the State College. She was a niece of Messrs. T. F. and T. L. Phillips and will be remembered by many of our people as Miss Mattie Welch.

The Democrat, Wednesday, October 19, 1892.

Logan, Mrs. Sallie The will of Mrs. Sallie Logan was probated Monday. She gives $6,000 to Midway Orphan School, and about $8,000 worth of property to the College of the Bible. The remainder of her estate passed to her nieces, Miss Elizabeth Grimes and Mrs. Robert C. Talbott.—Lexington Gazette.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, May 31, 1898

Logan, Mrs. Viola                    AA

 

Mrs. Logan Dies

Mrs. Viola Logan, foster daughter of the late Davis and Glorina Smith, died unexpectedly Wednesday morning at her home on Lincoln Street. Survivors include two daughters, Gloria Jean and Marsha Ann Logan, Winchester, two aunts, Mrs. Scott Burton, Clark County, Mrs. Jeanette Brewer, Grandy, Mass., an uncle, Stanley Strode, Camp Dennison, Ohio and other relatives.

Services will be held Saturday at 1:30 p.m., at the First Baptist Church by Rev. J. W. Jones, pastor.   Burial will be in Reeves Memorial Cemetery. The body will remain at Colerane Funeral Home until the hour service.

THE WINCHESTER SUN FRI. 4/19/1963

Logan, Mrs. W. J. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 9-23-1922
Logan, Rosa M. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 1-21, 1-27-2005
Logan, Russell The Winchester Sun   Wed., 3-21-1951
Logan, Ruth C. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 1-20, 1-21, 1-22-1988
Logan, Sanford McBrayer The Winchester Sun   Wed., 10-6-1943
Logan, Stephen B. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-19-1923
Logan, Weeden M. M. Young Man Suicides

Weeden M. M. Logan, only son of ex-Postmaster James M. Logan, committed suicide Tuesday evening at 6 o’clock at the residence of his parents near Shelbyville, by shooting himself through the head with a pistol. Death was instantaneous. He had been in town all day mingling with friends and drive home with his mother to supper at her request. On arriving there he went directly to his mother’s room and without warning killed himself in her presence. His last words were, “Good-by, Mamma.” No reason can be assigned for the rash act, as he was in the best of spirits.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, April 15, 1898

Logan, William (Will) The Winchester Sun   Thur., 2-23, 2-24-1950, 2-22-1951, 2-22-1954, 2-22-1955, 2-24-1956
Logan, William P. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 7-18-1936
Logan, Young At Cynthiana Friday, John Brown was arrested as an accomplice in the murder of Young Logan several weeks ago. The testimony at the examining trial was very damaging and he is held in default of $5,000.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, July 26, 1893

Logasa, Charles The Winchester Sun     Fri., 2-28-1936
Logdon, Frank T. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 9-11-1998
Logdon, James Lee The Winchester Sun   Tues., 1-2-1996
Logdon, Mrs. Anna Monson The Winchester Sun   Tues., 12-28-1993
Logdon, Mrs. Josephine Hilen The Winchester Sun   Tues., 12-16, 12-17-2003
Logdon, Mrs. Mary Barkley The Winchester Sun   Fri., 3-13, 3-14-1959
Logdon, William L. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 9-14-1974
Logel, Earnest Murder Is Charged

Owensboro, Ky. Sept. 15

James Hoheimer and his wife Annie Hohmeimer, were indicted Wednesday on the charge of murdering Earnest Logel.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Sept. 19, 1899

Logemann, Mrs. John The Winchester Sun   Wed., 4-17-1935
Logsden, Wm. Fayette-Jas. Logsden aged nineteen was tried and held over without bail for the murder of his father Wm. Logsden. The old man was in the habit of abusing his family and his son shot him.

The Winchester Democrat     Wed., 8-14-1889

 

Joe Logsden, aged 18, was sentenced last week to twenty-one years in the penitentiary by the Fayette Circuit Court for the murder of his father last July.

The Winchester Democrat     Wed., 12-18-1889

 

Prisoner Paroled

About twelve years ago James Logsdon, when a boy of eighteen years, and who lived near Athens, was sent to the penitentiary for twenty-one years for killing his father.   The latter abused the boy’s mother, which led to the killing. Logsdon has made a good prisoner and was this week paroled by the State Board and discharged from prison.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Feb. 12, 1901

Logsdon, J. W. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 10-9-1915
Logsdon, Huston Found Dead in Bed.

Richmond, Ky., May 31.-Huston Logsdon, a prominent merchant of Berea, was found dead in his bed. He was in apparently good health, and the cause of his death is not known.   He leaves a wife and four children.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, June 6, 1902.

Logsdon, Samuel G. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-10, 5-11-2004
Logue, John The Winchester Sun   Fri., 3-21-1924
Lollar, Drury Veteran minister dies

Marrowbone, Ky., – Elder Drury Lollar, a nonagenarian of Blacks Ferry, and one of the wealthiest citizens of this county, died at his home after an illness of many months, due to his extreme age.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, February 11, 1908

Lomas, Joseph D. Age 58, male, he was a hatter, he was born in Clark Co., KY, parents unknown, he lived in Winchester, KY, he died December 1, 1861 of whisky.

CCKD

Lones, Millie The Sun Sentinel Thur., 8-24-1911
Long, A. R. Stabbed His Daughter’s Lover

Waddy, Ky., April 11

Ben Shouse, a farmer, lectured his daughter because she stayed out late with two lovers. One of them, A. R. Long, began beating him over the head with a cane. Shouse then stabbed Long three times, inflicting a fatal wound.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., April 17, 1900

Long, Albert Insane From Alcoholism

Richmond, Ky., Feb. 12,–Albert Long, a young man aged 17, living near here, took his first drink of whisky Christmas and so good was the liquor that he got roaring drunk. Since then, although no intoxicants have passed his lips, all effort of his friends to sober him up has failed, and Friday he was pronounced insane from alcoholism and ordered to the Lexington asylum. It is not stated what brand of whisky he drank.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, February 15, 1898

Long, Alex                             AA The Winchester Sun   Thur., 12-17, 12-18, 12-19-1914
Long, Cecil R. The Winchester Sun Fri., 5-18, 5-19-1951
Long, Charles The Winchester Sun   Wed., 12-9-1936
Long, Charles   (Rodifer) The Winchester Sun   Sat., 1-3-1914
Long, Charles H. The Winchester Sun     Sat., 9-9-1933
Long, Charles H. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 2-3, 2-4, 2-5, 2-6-1998
Long, Charles W. (Red) The Winchester Sun   Tues., 2-11-1992
Long, Charles, J. The Winchester Sun     Mon., 2-26-1990
Long, Chester A. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 8-24, 8-26-1968
Long, Clarence The Winchester Sun   Sat., 5-29, 6-1-2004
Long, Connie Sue Charles The Winchester Sun   Thur., 3-9, 3-10-2006
Long, Edward Charged With Murder

Mayfield, Ky., April 5

Charles Carman is charged with shooting and killing Edward Long, who it is said, threw rocks at Carman.   The latter thought the pebbles were aimed at him and made a remark to Long, which caused the latter to attack Carman.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., April 11, 1899

Long, Emma FORD   Died—On December 25th, Mrs Emma D. Long, of Irvine, KY., at the residence of George Long. Her funeral was preached by Rev. Blake of Richmond, and she was buried in the Richmond cemetery.

The Democrat, Wednesday, January 6, 1892.

Long, Eulia E. The Winchester Sun     Mon., 11-20-1933
Long, Fannie Sue The Winchester News Thur., 1-11-1912
Long, Field Foolish Youth’s Deed.

Owensboro, Ky., July 8.—Field Long, 19 years old, shot and mortally wounded himself at the house of Lottie Christman, the keeper of a resort. Young Long was in love with the Christman woman and has been wanting to marry her, but she refused. He is the son of respectable people.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, July 11, 1902

Long, Floyd The Winchester Sun   Wed., 7-17, 7-18-1968
Long, G. T. Deaths

Mr. G. T. Long died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. J. W. Oliver, near this city, Dec. 24th, of paralysis, aged 80 years. After the funeral services at the Baptist Church Tuesday morning, the remains were conveyed to Georgetown where the interment took place. Mr. Long was a native of Scott county, but had lived here for a number of years. He was a model citizen, quite and unpretending in habits, but of decided convictions and strong character. A number of friends accompanied the remains to Georgetown.

The Sun-Sentinel   Thur., Dec. 28, 1905

Long, Georgia The Winchester Sun   Tues., 8-22-1995
Long, Henry The Winchester Sun   Wed., 5-16-1917
Long, Herbert C. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-8-1924
Long, Hiram The Winchester Sun   Fri., 4-2-1954, 4-2-1955, 4-2-1956
Long, infant son The Winchester Sun   Fri., 9-21, 9-22-1951
Long, J. T. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 9-13-1939
Long, J. Will Death Of J. Will Long

J. Will Long died at his home in this city Sunday morning of consumption, aged about thirty-eight years. He was the only child of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Long, who survives him.   He also leaves a wife, formerly Miss Flynn, and one son, Charles. The burial took place from the family residence yesterday afternoon being conducted by Eld. Jas. W. Harding. The deceased was a splendid citizen and a christian gentleman in the highest sense.   He was a member of the Knights of Pythias and of Hickman Lodge I. O. O. F., and the burial was under the auspices of the latter order.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., May 22, 1906

Long, James The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-13-1928
Long, Jeremiah C. Died—Rev. Jeremiah C. Long, an aged minister at Monroeville, Ala., in a protracted meeting several weeks ago produced a sensation by prophesying in open meeting that he would die suddenly on the morning of September 9th. On the morning of the 9th, according to the prophecy Mr. Long died very suddenly presumably of heart disease. The community was greatly wrought up over the exact fulfillment of the minister’s prophecy.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, September 17, 1897

Long, Joe Section Hand Killed

Elizabethtown, Ky., Sept. 11

In a collision between a handcar and a train near Rineyville, Joe Long, a section hand, was killed. Wiley Kron and a section hand named Edwards were seriously injured.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Sept. 17, 1901

Long, John John Long, a ten-year old boy, was drowned Thursday, while bathing in a pond near Baghdad, Ky. He was a nephew of Pres. Hieatt, of this county.

The Democrat   Wednesday, July 16, 1890

Long, John White Male, Single, born in 1840, approximately 75 years old, Father-unknown, Mother-unknown, he was a farmer, Died November 4, 1915, Buried November 5, 1915.

Kentucky Vital Statistics Death Certificate Number 26611 Volume 1915.

 

The Winchester Sun Fri., 11-4, 11-23-1915

Long, John                             AA The Winchester Sun   Sat., 5-4-1940
Long, John J. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 12-4-1935
Long, John Richard (Johnny) The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-21, 9-22, 9-23-1992
Long, John S. Madison; Died—John S. Long, after a long illness.

The Democrat, Wednesday, March 19, 1890.

Long, John S. John S. Long Expires.

Louisville, Ky., march 31.—John S. Long, a retired capitalist, died, aged 64 years. Mr. Long was largely interested in the building of the Texas Pacific and Chesapeake & Ohio southwestern railroads, the latter of which is now part of the Illinois Central.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, April 4, 1902

Long, Johnny The Winchester Sun   Sat., 4-17-1993
Long, Johnson Died From Lockjaw

Johnson Long, the fourteen-year-old son of ex-Sheriff A. C. Long, of Shelby county, died of lockjaw and brain fever, resulting from a slight wound caused by jumping on the stump of a weed.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Aug., 30, 1901

Long, Larry W. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 1-29-2002
Long, Lee The Winchester Sun   Sat., 6-1-1929
Long, M. M. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 9-13-1950
Long, Michael Madison-Michael long dropped dead of heart disease.

The Winchester Democrat     Wed., 11-13-1889

Long, Millard F. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-2-1953
Long, Mrs. Friday, at the home of her son, George Long, of Ford, Mrs. Long, of Estill county. The remains were taken to Richmond for interment.

The Democrat, Wednesday, December 30, 1891.

Long, Mrs. Amanda The Winchester Sun   Thur., 10-3-1957
Long, Mrs. Annie P. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-27-1950
Long, Mrs. Armiel Cheatham Millersburg, Ky., – Mrs. Armiel Cheatham Long, aged 58, wife of J.R. Long, died here. Prof. Floyd Long, Northwestern University, Chicago; Prof. O.W. Long, Texas Christian University, at Waco, Tex. And Miss Mayme Dee Long, with the Millersburg Femail college, are her children.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, February 16, 1909

Long, Mrs. Clarice Rowland The Winchester Sun   Sat., 7-16-1966
Long, Mrs. E. A. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 3-21-1919
Long, Mrs. Edith Jenkins The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-8-1960
Long, Mrs. Edna Fleming The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-10-1944
Long, Mrs. Elizabeth The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-30-1916
Long, Mrs. Ella Cecil The Winchester Sun   Tue., 8-27-1940
Long, Mrs. Ethel Elizabeth The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-11-1966
Long, Mrs. G. T. Died—Mrs. G. T. Long died at Lexington Tuesday after a long illness. The remains were taken to Georgetown for burial. Mrs. Long was the mother of Mrs. James W. Oliver, of this city, and leaves four other children—two daughters and two sons.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, May 12, 1899

Long, Mrs. Grover Glasgow – Lucille Church, 16, daughter of William Church, a prominent farmer of Goodnight, was burned to death by the explosion of a jug of oil, and her sister,             Mrs. Grover Long, was so seriously burned she will probably die. The young woman   was making a fire and pouring oil out of a jug when it became heated and exploded.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, November 8, 1910

Long, Mrs. Jack Madison-Died-Mrs. Jack Long, near Cottonburg.

The Winchester Democrat     Wed., 8-28-1889

Long, Mrs. Julia (Judy) The Winchester Sun   Tues., 8-13-2002
Long, Mrs. M. M. Death of Mrs. Long

Mrs. M.M. Long died Sunday at her home in North Park of a complication of diseases. The remains were buried the following day in the Winchester cemetery with services at the grave by Rev. C.E. Crafton.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, March 6, 1908

Long, Mrs. Mary The Winchester Sun   Wed. 10-12-1927
Long, Mrs. Mary Boyd Reeves The Winchester Sun   Sat., 3-28, 3-30-1998
Long, Mrs. Mary Clay Boone The Winchester Sun   Sat., 10-11, 10-13-1969
Long, Mrs. Mary Lou Temple The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-23-1994
Long, Mrs. Mattie Barnes The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-28-1983
Long, Mrs. Mayme S. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-25, 11-26-1994
Long, Mrs. Mettie Vaughan The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-23-1931
Long, Mrs. Nannie L.           AA The Winchester Sun   Thur., 9-5-1929
Long, Mrs. Oldia Collins

(Granny)

The Winchester Sun Sat., 7-28-2007
Long, Mrs. Sarah Mildred The Winchester Sun   Thur., 3-15-1990
Long, Mrs. Stella Mae The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-30-1987
Long, Mrs. Sudie Mae The Winchester Sun   Thur., 4-15, 4-16-1948
Long, Mrs. Thelma Edwards The Winchester Sun   Fri., 12-16-2005

Scobee Funeral Home Web Site Thur., 12-15-2005

Long, Ova The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-4-1977
Long, Perry C. Perry C. Long, a well known farmer of the Edenton locality, died Friday under rather singular circumstances. On Monday, while shucking corn he ran a thorn into one of his fingers. No serious result from the injury was apprehended until the next day, when his hand and arm became badly swollen. Blood poisoning followed and Friday he was a corpse. He was about 75 years old and an ex-Union soldier.—Richmond Register

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, December 14, 1897

Long, Robert Robt. Long, of Madison county; was thrown from his horse and badly injured, his scalp being torn from a large portion of his head. Lockjaw ensued and died at the end of nine days.

The Democrat   Wednesday April 3, 1889

Long, Robert Age 27, male, he was a carpenter, he was married, his father was George Long, he was born in Clark County, KY, he lived in Clark County, KY, he died March 22, 1857 of typhoid fever.

CCKD

Long, Robert Ernest The Winchester Sun   Fri., 9-11-1992
Long, S. Noel Deaths.

S. Noel Long died last week at his home at Columbia, South Carolina, aged 44 years, of pneumonia. The remains were brought to Georgetown for interment. He was a prominent Odd Fellow and Knights of Pythias. He was a brother of Mrs. J. W. Oliver, of this city and was very popular.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, April 4, 1902

Long, Sam The Winchester Sun   Wed., 4-22-1931
Long, Sam C. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 7-3-1939
Long, Thomas C. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 1-24-1972
Long, Thomas W. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 12-27-1932
Long, Vernon Turley The Winchester Sun   Tues., 5-12-2009
Long, W. T. W. T. Long, of Versailles, dropped dead last week. His wife figured as a character in a novel called “Tempest and Sunshine”.

Clark County Democrat   Wed., 3-16-1881

Long, Wilbur Deaths

Wilbur Long died this week at Mt. Sterling, aged ninety eight years. He was perhaps the oldest man in Central Kentucky.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Feb. 16, 1906

Long, William Age 27, male, he was a single, he was a carpenter, he was born in Clark County, KY,parents unknown, he lived in Clark County, KY, he died May 6, 1857 of typhoid fever.

CCKD

Long, William Henry The Winchester Sun   Tues., 3-9-1948
Longe, child At Mt. Eber, the 11 year old child of Captain James K. Longe choked to death on a marble.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, June 21, 1893

Longmire, Eulice The Winchester Sun   Thur., 7-19-1928
Longmire, Mrs. Annie Ramsey The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-18-1963
Longmire, Mrs. Nelue Crume The Winchester Sun   Wed., 7-9-1980
Longmoor, Mrs. Melissa

Worthington

The Winchester Sun   Sat., 7-21-1923
Longmoor, W. W. W. W. Longmoor, Clerk of the Court of Appeals, died Friday at the State House in Frankfort, of paralysis of the heart. His brother-in-law, G. B. Adams, was appointed by the Governor to fill the vacancy until August when a Clerk will be elected. In a card Mr. Adams says he will be a candidate then and will pay all the profits to Mrs. Longmoor. It is said Will Hampton, of Montgomery, will also be a candidate. George Madden who ran before will also try again.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, March 25,1891

Longnecker, Elizabeth Riley The Winchester Sun   Thur., 12-9-1937
Longnecker, Frank The Winchester Sun   Tues., 9-16, 11-4-1913
Longstreet, James Gen. Longstreet Dead

General James Longstreet, soldier, statesman and diplomat, and the last Lt. Gen. of the Confederate army with the exception of Gen. Gordon, died in Gainesville, Ga., January 2nd, from an attack of acute pneumonia. He had been ill two days. He was eighty-years old. He is survived by his wife, two sons and a daughter. The body was buried in Gainesville, which has been his home since the Civil War.

The Sun-Sentinel   Thur., Jan. 7, 1904

Longworth, Mrs. Amanda The Winchester Sun     Fri., 9-2-1932
Loomans, Mr. ________ A man named Loomans was killed in a drunken row in Rockcastle county Thursday. Loomans’ wife was also severely cut and wounded while trying to defend her husband.

The Winchester Democrat     Wed., 8-17-1892

Looney, child Fell On A Knife

Beattyville, Ky., Nov. 15

The 8-year old child of Mrs. Polly Looney, while playing with a companion, fell on an army knife, which entered its throat and resulted in her death.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Nov. 21, 1899

Looney, engineer A suit of Mrs. Sophia Looney against the Eastern Kentucky Railroad for $25,000 for the death of her husband is on trial in the Federal Court at Louisville. Looney was an engineer and was killed by a big rock falling on him while going through a cut.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, February 5, 1897

Looney, Gib The Winchester Sun   Thur., 10-8-1931
Looney, Mrs. Nell Marie The Winchester Sun   Thur., 12-9-1999
Loos, Charles Louis The Winchester News Wed., 2-23-1912
Lopp, Mrs. Della Mae The Winchester Sun   Wed., 7-16-1986
Lord, Mrs. Lillie Beatrice The Winchester Sun   Thur., 12-7, 12-8, 12-9-2006
Lorenz, Chester R. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-11-1980
Lorimer, Geo. C. Elder Geo. C. Lorimer (Baptist) is dead. He was recognized to be one of the ablest ministers in the world. He was formerly an actor.

The Sun-Sentinel   Thur., Sept. 15, 1904

Loring, Matthew Jake The Winchester Sun   Fri., 8-24-2001
Loring, Travis S. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 8-24-2001
Losh, Mrs. Margaret Lynn The Winchester Sun   Fri., 12-24, 12-27-2010
Loth, Mrs. J. Ellison The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-19-1948
Lott, James W. The last will and testament of James W. Lott dec. produced in court …….oaths of N. D. Locknane and John M. Riffe witnesses ……recorded.

Order Book 12; P. 604; November Court !853

 

On motion of John Grigsby the Exec. named in the last will and testament of James W. Lott dec. …..certificate for obtaining   a probate ……with Nathaniel D. Couchman ……..bond and security approved……..

Order Book 12; P. 604; November Court !853

 

On motion of John Grigsby Exec. of James W. Lott dec. ordered that Colby Quisenberry, Roger Quisenberry and Daniel Duvall ……..appraise personalty of said decedent ……..report.

Order Book 12; P. 604; November Court !853

Lott, John Robert On motion of John Grigsby who made oath thereto as the law directs certificate is granted …….letters of administration on the estate of John Robert Lott dec. …….with Nathaniel D. Couchman security……….bond and security approved by court.

Order Book 12; P.490; September Court 1852

 

On motion of John Grigsby admin of John Robert Lott ordered that H. W. Calmes, James F. Quisenberry and Nathaniel Ragland or any three …………appraise ……..report.

Order Book 12; P.490; September Court 1852

 

Inventory of the personalty of John R. Lott Dec. was produced …….approved …….recorded.

Order Book 12; P. 556; April Court 1853

 

Sale bill of the personalty of John R. Lott dec. was produced …….approved …….recorded.

Order Book 12; P. 556; April Court 1853

Lott, William Ordered that R. Denson, William Ritchie and George Fry Jr. be appointed commissioners to settle and adjust all accounts with John B. Ryon curator of the estate of William Lott decd. and make report to the court.

Order Book 10; P. 40; October Court 1831

 

Settlement with the curator of the estate of William Lott decd. ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 10; P. 117; April Court 1833

Loudenburge, R. L. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 1-3-1953
Louder, David I. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 2-10, 2-11-1989
Louder, Mrs. Gertrude The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-21-1977
Loudon, Mrs. Ollie MacGregor The Winchester Sun   Tues., 1-29-1946
Loughridge, William J. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 6-23-1928
Louisville Bodies THIRTY DEAD BODIES.

They Were Found in a Cold Storage Plant in Louisville, Ky.

Louisville, Ky., Oct. 9.-Thirty dead bodies were found Wednesday night in a cold storage plant in the rear of an ice cream factory on Eighth   street. The same pipes that were used in congealing the cream for table use were connected up with a small plant in a shed in the rear where they kept the bodies cool. It was at first thought that the cadavers had been brought here from Indianapolis, but the heads of the several colleges interested in the establishment asserted that the bodies were obtained legitimately by them from the penitentiaries, insane asylums and other institutions of the state of Kentucky.   Chief of Police Gunther received a letter from the chief of police of Indianapolis, inclosing a letter from a woman in Louisville, who said she had lived at the place in question and that some of the bodies stolen in Indianapolis had been shipped here and were stored in the shed. Chief Gunther sent two policemen to the scene. They report that they could not get in the shed without breaking it open.   While the chief of police was trying to get the permission of the court to open the building, those having charge of the place sent word to police headquarters that the building was open and the investigation was made. The building was a small one, provided with numerous thermometers for the proper observation of the temperature. The bodies were found in boxes and most of them were in good state of preservation. The establishment is maintained by several Louisville medical colleges. The head of the institutions say they are given the bodies by the state with the understanding that they are to be held 30 days for identification. In order to assist in the identification the cold storage plant was established and an arrangement made with the ice cream plant to furnish the cooling air.   The building is on Eight street, but the entrance to the place where the bodies were found is from an alley.   Indianapolis, Ind., Oct. 10.-A party headed by Detectives Asch and Manning went to Louisville Thursday afternoon to identify, if possible, some of the bodies found in a cold storage room in that city Wednesday night. It is thought that some of the bodies were stolen from Indianapolis cemeteries and which mysteriously disappeared from the colleges here, may be found there.   The party included besides the detectives, Wesley Gates and his son, Everett R. Gates, of Irvington: J. E. and George H. Stilz, William T. Long, Attorney Cass Conaway and several newspaper men. Louisville, Ky., October 10.-The Indianapolis people who came over to Louisville to view the bodies found in the cold storage plant here announced Thursday night that they had failed to identify any of them.

The Winchester Sentinel, Wednesday, October 15, 1902.

Louminghouser, Dewey The Winchester Sun Fri., 11-29-1912
Lourey, James Will Book 2, Page 2

Dated: June 1, 1882

Recorded: September 28 and October 6, 1885

Louthan, Sharron L. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-22-1967
Love, Bessie Louise The Winchester Sun   Fri., 4-29, 4-30-2005

Scobee Funeral Home Web Site Thur., 4-28-2005

Love, Eugene E. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-21-1975
Love, Henry Life Sentence For Them

Pineville, Ky., Jan. 9

A verdict of murder for killing Henry Love at Middlesboro last February was returned against Clarence Gray and Jesse Bull. Sentence was fixed at life imprisonment, the same penalty that was made out to William Young some time ago.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Jan. 12, 1906

Love, James The Winchester Sun   Wed., 12-14-1938
Love, John Motion On Margaret Love certificate is granted her for obtaining letters of administration of the estate of John Love decd. with Thomas Owens, Elias Browning and James Sympson security.

Order Book 4; P. 452-453; February Court 1811

 

Order for the appraisal of the slaves if any and personal estate of John Love decd.

Order Book 4; P. 453; February Court 1811

 

Ordered that Thomas Scott, Sylvester Sapington, Caleb Embree, and James Daniel do allot to Margaret Love her dower in the estate of her late husband John Love decd. and make report.

Order Book 4; P. 453; February Court 1811

Love, Mr._______ AWAY back in the forties a man named Love went to Texas and secured the title to a large tract of land embracing a portion of the present site of Galveston, and also several adjacent villages. Love was shortly after killed by the Indians.   Several years ago suit was brought by his heirs and their title affirmed by all the courts up to the Supreme Court of the State, the last decision being rendered a few weeks ago.   The estate is valued at ten million dollars, and W. O. Dunlap, a stepson of Dr. B. F. Walter, of this city, is heir to one-twelfth of it.

The Democrat, Wednesday, December 9, 1891.

Love, Mrs. Alice Bean The Winchester Sun   Wed., 1-2-1935
Love, Mrs. Daisy Owens The Winchester Sun   Mon., 7-28, 7-29-1952
Love, Mrs. Hazel S. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 6-21, 6-22-1996
Love, Mrs. Leeanna The Winchester Sun   Fri., 1-6-1978
Love, Robert P. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 3-14-1980
Love, S. P. Col. S. P. Love Dead

Greenville, Ky., March 28

Col. S. P. Love died after a lingering illness. He was prominent as a soldier and citizen, being a veteran of the Mexican and civil wars, and had served the people as county judge.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., April 3, 1903

Love, Teddy Joe The Winchester Sun   Sat., 2-5-1983
Love, Thomas The Winchester Sun Tues., 1-21-1913
Lovejoy, Mrs. Charlene K. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 4-19-2008
Lovelace – Guffey Feud The Winchester Sun   Fri., 9-4-1931
Lovelace, Fox The Winchester Sun   Fri., 9-9-1921
Lovelace, John Geo. Raynor, who shot John Lovelace in Danville Christmas and escaped, taking the wife of Lovelace with him has been captured at Louisville and was taken back to Danville for trial.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, February 7, 1894

Lovelace, John Thomas The Winchester Sun   Wed., 6-13-1928
Lovelace, Lisle The Winchester Sun   Mon., 7-13-1931
Lovelace, Mrs. Demia Died, Feb. 24, at 11 p. m., at the residence of James W. Steele, in Beattyville, Ky., Mrs. Demia Lovelace, widow of the late Columbus Lovelace. The interment took place at the St. Helens Friday.

The Sun-Sentinel   Thur., March 3, 1904

Lovelace, Mrs. Mary E. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 6-8, 6-10-1946
Lovelace, Otho The Winchester Sun   Fri., 9-4-1931
Lovelace, Robert A. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 11-7-1967
Loveland, C. H. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 4-5, 4-7-1919
Loveland, Le Von The Winchester Sun   Tues., 12-20-1977
Loveland, Mrs. Anna Le Van The Winchester Sun   Wed., 4-2-1952
Lovell, Edgar K. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-16, 5-17-1960
Lovell, Garland Burl The Winchester Sun   Tues., 8-25-1953
Lovell, Gary Glenn The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-17-2001
Lovell, Mrs. Howell Lewis Famous Beauty Of Old Virginia Days Passes Away, Home Near Covington

Lexington, Ky.,

Mrs. Howell Lewis Lovell, of Covington, died here at Kenmore farm, the home of her daughter, Mrs. J. Will Sayre. Mrs. Lovell was 76 years old and had been in poor health for several months. She came to Kenmore recently with her daughter, Miss Fannie Lovell, for a short visit, and was taken worse upon her arrival here. Her husband was a well known business man of Covington, being president of the Lovell Tobacco Works. He died seven years ago. Mrs. Lovell’s other daughter, Mrs. Virginia Lovell Hodge, was also here with her when she died. Mrs. Lovell came from a Virginia family, and was famous for her beauty. She was popular socially in Cincinnati and Covington.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., July 27, 1906

Lovell, Mrs. Ida B. Cravens The Winchester Sun   Fri., 10-19, 10-20-1962
Lovely, J. V. The Christian church at Paris now has but one Elder. In the last six months two, J. W. Lucas and J. V. Lovely, have died and Capt. J. M. Thomas has resigned.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, January 25, 1895

Lovely, John L. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 10-12-1932
Lovely, Mrs. Jesse The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-16-1954
Lovens, Dick Terrible Feud Outbreak.

Five Men Reported Killed in Clay county Ky.—War Between the Philpot and Morris Factions.

Louisville, Ky., July 18.—A special from London, Ky., tells of a report reaching here of the outbreak of another feud in Clay county by which five men lost their lives Monday.

The dead are said to be: Robert Philpot, Ed Fisher, Aaron Morris, Jim Griffin and Hugh Griffin.

These fatalities resulted from a pitched battle fought near Little Goose creek, three miles of Manchester.

The feud dates back nearly two years. On Christmas, 1897, James Philpot was killed by Aaron Morris, but before he died he shot and killed Wm. Bundy, a friend of Morris. The Morris and Griffins were closely affiliated. Since then the feuding between the two factions has been very bitter, and it has been aroused recently by the White-Baker hostilities.

The Philpots, who are the strongest faction in the mountain numbering about 750 voters, openly espoused the cause of the Bakers, White, the Griffins took sides with the Whites. The story that reaches here from Manchester is to the effect that Bob Philpot was arrested Monday morning by Deputy Sheriff Wash Thacker. While very circumstantial, in other respects the report does not show clearly the origin of the trouble nor give the reason for Philpot’s arrest.

It is said that while Thacker was taking Philpot’s bond, the latter was shot from behind by a member of a crowd that had gathered. This precipitated a general fight with Winchesters and revolvers, which was participated in by George, Granville, Robert and Peter Philpot and Ed Fisher on one side and Aaron Morris, Hugh, Jim and Green Griffin on the other.

The battle began about 9 o’clock and raged fiercely for ten or fifteen minutes. When it was over it was found that the five men mentioned above had been killed outright, three of the belligerents were seriously wounded, while Pete Philpot was the only one on either side to escape injury. Granville Philpot is said to be one of the most seriously wounded. He is a union veteran having lost a leg at Stone river. He is an ex-member of the Kentucky legislature and is said to have killed three or four men.

Ed Fisher, who is reported dead, was another man with several nicks in his cane. He was but 23 years old but was said to have killed three men. The story of this battle caused consternation here notwithstanding the fact that serious trouble has been expected to break out among the mountaineers of Clay county ever since the assassination of Tom Baker several weeks ago. An effort was at once begun to secure deputies to go to the seat of the trouble and attempt to restore quiet, but up to a late hour in the afternoon there had not been enough responses to make up a force that would command respect. The situation at Manchester is deplorable. Since morning the place has been in a state of terror, scarcely anyone daring to venture out of doors. Business is suspended and the residents are momentarily expecting a renewal of hostilities.

The entire county of Clay is filled with men mounted and armed. Other battles may occur at any moment.

A relative of the Philpots has just left here to join his family and swears vengeance.

London Depot, Ky., July 18.—Clay county has another killing for its annals. Dick Lovens’ body has been found three miles from Manchester. He was beaten to death in the night. When found his head was severed from his body and had been beaten to a pulp.

A 45-calibre revolver was found on the body. Having killed three men and injured several, he was probably killed by the friends on one of his victims. He leaves a widow and eight children.

An attempt has been made to kill Will Gray, near Manchester, Clay county. After three shots had passed through his clothes, one of them scraping his body, he escaped by running through a forest. Gray is one of the Baker’s friends.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, July 21, 1899

Lovens, Mrs. Fanny Powell The Winchester Sun   Thur., 3-18-1965
Lovensheimer, William Frank The Winchester Sun   Thur., 12-3-1998
Lovern, Mrs. Dixie The Winchester Sun   Tues., 3-24, 3-25-1964
Lovett, A. J. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 4-11-1922
Lovett, Clarence The Winchester Sun   Fri., 12-26-1930
Lovett, Finis The Winchester Sun,   Thurs., 4-21, 5-3, 5-4-1921
Lovett, Mrs. Ann Hukle The Winchester Sun   Fri., 3-9-1945
Lovett, Mrs. Elizabeth The Winchester Sun   Wed., 5-12-1926
Lovett, Mrs. Lula Van Devere The Winchester Sun   Sat., 5-21-1966
Lovett, Oliver The Winchester Sun   Wed., 6-2-1965
Lovey, Mrs. W. L. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 4-11-1930
Lovill, Mrs. Susan Mrs. Susan Lovill, of Spencer county, committed suicide on Thursday by drowning herself in a barrel of water. Her mind has been affected at times for some years. She leaves six grown children.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, April 26, 1893

Loving, James Killed by a Falling Tree

James Loving, aged eighteen, was instantly killed on a farm near Casky Tuesday morning. He was caught under a tree, which was chopped down by laborers. He was warned of the danger, but seemed paralyzed by fear.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, March 11, 1898

Loving, John An Old Merchant dead.

LOUISVILLE, Ky., Nov. 19—John Loving, aged 80 years, one of the oldest merchants in the city, died Thursday morning. His death was occasioned by a fall on the waxed floor of a dining room, which he sustained a few days ago.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, November 23, 1897.

Loving, Mrs. Tobia A Piteous Sight

A dispatch from London, Ky. says: A piteous sight met the eyes of a colored woman who went to the hovel of Mrs. Tobia Loving near Pittsburg. Mrs. Loving was in bed dead, having been dead about three days, while her three-year-old baby was lying by her side nearly starved and frozen, crying bitterly.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Jan. 1, 1900

Lovings, Betty June The Winchester Sun   Tues., 9-9-1930
Lovings, Danny Glen The Winchester Sun   Wed., 8-18, 8-19-1999
Lovings, Ed The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-22-1955
Lovings, Gary Ray The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-18, 4-19-1977
Lovings, Henry The Winchester Sun Sat., 9-2-1950
Lovings, James Arthur The Winchester Sun   Wed., 10-18, 10-19-2006
Lovings, James D. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-12, 10-13-1964
Lovings, James Eastin The Winchester Sun   Tues., 4-28, 4-29-1964
Lovings, James Ray (Bo) The Winchester Sun Thur., 11-5, 11-6-1992
Lovings, Karen Renee The Winchester Sun   Wed., 5-12-1976
Lovings, Mrs. Grace Ketchum The Winchester Sun   Tue., 5-15, 5-16-1975
Lovings, Mrs. Mollie Mosley The Winchester Sun   Mon., 1-9, 1-10-1950
Lovings, Mrs. Pat Saylor The Winchester Sun   Sat., 2-9, 2-18-1980
Lovings, Mrs. Valeria Booth The Winchester Sun   Thur., 3-1, 3-2-1979
Lovings, R. L. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-16, 3-17-1953
Lovings, Randall The Winchester Sun   Thur., 10-27-1966
Lovings, Richard Daniel Sr. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 7-11-1985
Lovings, Williams Tolbert The Winchester Sun Wed., 4-15-1981
Lovins, Robert Campbell The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-18-1939
Lovitt, Ancil The Winchester Sun   Thurs., 8-22-1918
Low, child Burned To Death

The three-year-old child of Mr. and Mrs. John Low, of Powell county, caught fire from a stove Monday and was burned to death.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Nov. 29, 1901

Low, Eliza The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-27-1916
Low, John The last will and testament of John Low dec. was produced in court and proven according to law by the oaths of Eli Bruce and Daniel Harden witnesses thereto subscribed and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 10; P. 246; August Court 1835

Lowden, J. H. John Popp Arrested

Newcastle, Ky., March 30

John Popp, Jr., who shot and killed J. H. Lowden, at Drennon Springs, last Thursday, was arrested Sunday evening by Sheriff Francis Adams, of this county. The coroner’s verdict was that the killing was without provocation.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., April 3, 1903

Lowden, Mary The Winchester Sun   Fri., 1-27-1939
Lowe, Absalom THE WAR OF 1812 – 2nd Corp.

The Roll of Two Companies Raised in Clark County by Capt. James Sympson

Capt. James Sympson’s Company of Kentucky Mounted Volunteers, August 25th 1813.

The Semi-Weekly Sun     Fri., 2-21-1879

Lowe, Albert F. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 9-26-1995
Lowe, Albert H. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 1-2, 12-31-1953, 1-2-1954
Lowe, B. H. Ethelbert Owens, of Fayette county, last week killed his brother-in-law B. H. Lowe. Cause, difficulty growing out of the settlement of the family estate. Owens was tried at Lexington and held over to $3,000 bail, which he gave.

The Winchester Democrat     Wed., 10-16-1889

 

Fayette-The Grand Jury refused to indict Ethelbert Owens who recently killed his brother-in-law B. H. Lowe in self-defense.

The Winchester Democrat     Wed., 12-4-1889

Lowe, baby Indian Fields

The three months old baby of Mrs. Tom Lowe was found dead in bed one morning last week.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., March 6, 1903

Lowe, Charlie The Winchester Sun   Tues., 1-13-1920
Lowe, Claude C. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-22, 4-23-1957
Lowe, Claude C. Jr. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-31-1923
Lowe, Edward Burial of the Dead Soldiers.

MINNEAPLIS, Minn., Oct. 10.-The funerals of Maj. Melville C. Wilkinson, Sergt. Wm. Butler and Privates Alfred Zebell, Edward Lowe, John Olmstead and John Showolstocker, member of the 3rd United States infantry, who fell in the battle with Indians at Leech lake, October 5, were held at Fort Snelling Sunday afternoon.   It was estimated that six to eight thousand people were in attendance.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, October 11, 1898.

Lowe, Eva Died—Miss Eva Lowe, formerly stenographer of the K. U. R’y Co., at Clay City, died at her home near Pottsville last week. She had numerous relatives in this county and was a member of the First Baptist church at Lexington at the time of her death.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, August 30, 1895

Lowe, Fannie Bailey The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-1-2005
Lowe, Francis Marion Will Book 2, Page 16

Dated: April 13, 1885

Recorded: April 23, 1885 in Jackson, MO, August 7, 1886 in Clark Co, KY

Lowe, Fred Death of a Good Man.

Squire Fred Lowe was paralyzed Friday and died at his home in the eastern part of the county the following day, aged nearly eighty years. The funeral was preached Sunday by Rev. Richard French and the remains were buried in the family graveyard.

He was one of the best citizens in the county, and for a long time was a member of the Board of Magistrates and one of the best members of that body.

His wife was originally Miss Vivion, but was Mrs. Tuttle when he married. She died a few years ago. He leaves no children but several grandchildren. He was one of the oldest and best friends of The Democrat and had been a subscriber from the first issue.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, March 21, 1899

 

County Court Items

Will of F. Lowe probated.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., March 28, 1899

 

County Court Items

J. M. and C. Piersall appointed executors of F. Lowe, with John R. Bush, B. R. Bush, B. J. Thomas and M. J. Powers Appraisers.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., March 28, 1899

 

Squire F. Lowe, by will dated June 27th, 1898, left 155 acres of land to his grandchildren, John Piersall, Jr., Chelsey Piersall, Fred Piersall, Mrs. Mollie Hardesty, Nancy Piersall and Carrie Piersall; to Orley Hardy Vivion forty-three acres of land near White Hall. These lands are to be rented out until the rents will pay whatever debts the testor might owe, before being divided. Orley Vivion is also to have $200 out of the rents. He directs that neat iron fence be placed around the family graves and names John W. Piersall, Jr., Chilsey Piersall and Fred Piersall as executors.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., March 31, 1899

 

Jonas R. Bush, auct., reports the sale of J. M. Piersall & Bros., executors of the late F. Lowe, on Tuesday, April 4th, as well attended and good prices prevailed.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., April 11,1899

Lowe, Gary R. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 7-14-1986
Lowe, infant The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-8-1955
Lowe, Irvin S. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 3-28-1934
Lowe, J. Willie Saturday night, of Bright’s disease resulting from diphtheria, J. Willie Lowe, only son of J. R. Lowe and wife, aged ten years. Burial Sunday in the Winchester Cemetery; services at the grave by Eld. J. W. Harding. Willie was one of the best children to be found anywhere; gentle, kind and pious, he was the favorite alike of the old and young. Never strong in body, his intellect was bright far beyond his years, and he gave promise of a true and useful manhood. This beautiful bud, just opening has been, however, transplanted into the celestial gardens above, there to bloom through all eternity in the sunlight of God’s love, and the parents loss here is only an added interest therein.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, May 3, 1893

Lowe, James David James David Lowe, 53, of 299 E. Washington St., brother of Allan Lowe, died at 10:55 p. m. Tuesday at the University of Kentucky Medical Center in Lexington.

Arrangements are incomplete at Scobee Funeral Home.

The Winchester Sun Wed., 8-30-2006

 

James David Lowe, 53 of 299 E. Washington St., died at 10:55 p. m. Tuesday at the University of Kentucky Medical Center in Lexington.

A native of Middletown, Ohio, he was the son of the late James Harold and Cynthia Gillum Lowe.   He was a Marine for eight years, a Vietnam veteran and a member of the Ark of Mercy Church of God. Survivors include a son, Zach Lowe of Winchester; a daughter, Amanda Lowe of Winchester; a brother, Alan Kent Lowe of Winchester; two sisters, Phyllis Robb of Winchester and Linda Miller of Ohio; and several nieces, nephews and cousins.

Graveside services will be conducted at 12:30 p. m. Friday in the Camp Nelson National Cemetery in Nicholasville by the Rev. Ryan Dotson.

Pallbearers will be Gary Combs, Tony Spencer, Shawn Dunaway, Bill Kennon, Colby Combs, Gary Combs II and Josh Earnest.

There will be no visitation. Scobee Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.

The guest book is at wwwscobeefunerahome.com.

The Winchester Sun Thurs., 8-31-2006

Lowe, James R. Death Of James R. Lowe

The remains of James R. Lowe were buried in the cemetery here Monday afternoon. Mr. Lowe was born in this county fifty years ago, and was a son-in-law of the late Thacher Quisenberry. Some years since he sold his farm near Providence Church in this county, and moved to Lexington, where he studied for the ministry. Later he engaged in business. He was an officer of the Broadway Christian Church at Lexington and was a man of exceptional moral character.

The Sun-Sentinel   Thur., April 21, 1904

Lowe, Janice Cole The Winchester Sun   Thur., 12-20-1990
Lowe, Jenet Sue The Winchester Sun   Thur., 9-26-1946
Lowe, John Thomson; Died—On the 6th inst., John Lowe, aged 58 years. He was buried at Bethlehem, and leaves a wife and eight children.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, November 19, 1890

 

Mrs. Chloe Rupard appointed administratrix of John Lowe, and W. D. Huls, David Barrow and A. H. Rupard appointed appraisers of his estate.

The Democrat, Wednesday, November 26, 1890.

Lowe, John The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-25-1939
Lowe, John Ray The Winchester Sun   Thur., 12-30-1971
Lowe, Kenneth W. III The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-6-1973
Lowe, Kenneth W. Sr. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-11, 12-12-1989
Lowe, Leland Bush The Winchester Sun   Thur., 3-4, 3-5-1982
Lowe, Leonard The Winchester Sun   Sat., 7-6-1935
Lowe, Mack P. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 12-22-1989
Lowe, Marion M. (Buddy) The Winchester Sun   Thur., 4-13-1989
Lowe, Mary Ann The Winchester Sun   Fri., 7-23-1920
Lowe, Mose The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-12, 11-13-1962
Lowe, Mose Sr. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 3-30-1946
Lowe, Mrs. Ben The Winchester Sun   Thur., 8-22-1935
Lowe, Mrs. Chloe Brought here for burial

Mrs. Chloe Lowe died at her home near Berea, Madison county, Sunday, the remains were brought here Tuesday and were buried in the old Rupard graveyard in the county. She was formerly Miss Rupard and for many years lived in this county.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, April 1, 1910

Lowe, Mrs. Claude The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-22, 10-23-1917
Lowe, Mrs. Elizabeth The Winchester Sun   Thur., 2-8, 2-9-1973
Lowe, Mrs. Elizabeth Tuggle The Winchester Sun   Wed., 12-10-1947
Lowe, Mrs. Eunice Walters The Winchester Sun   Fri., 2-24-1995
Lowe, Mrs. Evelyn Pasley The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-15-1976
Lowe, Mrs. F. M. Died.—Suddenly , of heart disease, Saturday, Mrs. F. M. Lowe, wife of Squire Lowe , of Goodes precinct; interment at the family burying ground, the funeral services being conducted by Rev. Wm. Rupard. Mrs. Lowe was in the ninetieth year of her age and was probably the oldest woman in the county. She was highly esteemed by all who knew her.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, February 11, 1891

Lowe, Mrs. Fannie Elizabeth The Winchester Sun   Tues., 2-4, 2-5-1997
Lowe, Mrs. Frances Hendrix The Winchester Sun   Sat., 7-22-1978
Lowe, Mrs. Harriet Death Of Mrs. Lowe

Mrs. Harriet Lowe died at her home on Lexington Avenue Tuesday morning aged sixty-five years, of throat trouble, probably cancer. The funeral was preached at her late residence on Lexington Avenue by Rev. W. T. McElroy, and the remains were interred in the family lot in the Winchester Cemetery.

Mrs. Lowe possessed a mind of remarkable vigor which had been carefully cultivated, and was one of the best informed women in the city. She was formerly Miss Williams, a sister of Gen. John S. Williams and others. Of a large family the only survivors are Ben Williams and Mrs. Shyrock, both of which lived with her. Her husband, Francis Marion Lowe, died several years ago and during his life was a man of much prominence. He lived in Bourbon county for many years and represented his county in both branches of the legislature.

The Wichester Democrat   Fri., Jan. 18, 1901

Lowe, Mrs. Hazel Cynthia The Winchester Sun   Fri., 10-11-1996
Lowe, Mrs. John Died, September 3rd, at her residence near Thomson, Mrs. John Lowe.

The Winchester Democrat     Wed., 9-5-1888

Lowe, Mrs. Julia Hall The Winchester Sun   Fri., 10-9, 10-10-1970
Lowe, Mrs. Jurshia Quisenberry The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-29-1945
Lowe, Mrs. Mary Fraysur The Winchester Sun   Mon., 1-13, 1-14-1964
Lowe, Mrs. Mollie Ann Harris The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-17-1922
Lowe, Mrs. Pearl Lowe The Winchester Sun Tues., 6-26-2007
Lowe, Mrs. Polly Merritt; Died—At her home in this county, February 7th, Mrs. Polly Lowe, aged 89 years. She was the oldest person in this end of the county and respected by all who knew her.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, February 18, 1891

Lowe, Mrs. Sudie Osborne The Winchester Sun   Fri., 3-7, 3-8 -1969
Lowe, Rickey Joe The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-9-1962
Lowe, Riley The Winchester Sun   Wed., 3-5-1947
Lowe, Riley Jr. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 3-30, 4-1-2004

Scobee Funeral Home Web Site 3-30-2004

Lowe, S. W. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 1-9-1914
Lowe, son Died.-Monday, the two-year-old son of Seth Lowe, who lives near Dodge, died quite suddenly, and with symptoms resembling poison. Considerable excitement ensued but no one was suspected of having administered it intentionally, and no official investigation was made. The funeral was preached the following day by Eld. J. W. Harding.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, December 23, 1898.

 

THE death of the little child of ‘Mose’ Lowe, which at first was thought to have been caused by poison, was due to brain fever; so says the attending physicians, Drs. Combs and Lockhart.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, December 27, 1898.

Lowe, Tammy Sue The Winchester Sun   Sat., 5-13-1967
Lowe, Walter F. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 6-13-1991
Lowe, Walter F. Jr. (Bobby) The Winchester Sun   Sat., 9-2-1972
Lowe, William The Winchester Sun   Tues., 11-4-1913
Lowe, William P. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 6-14-2000
Lowe, Willie The Winchester Sun     Mon., 11-13-1933
Lowe. M. C. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 9-30-1919
Lowell, George The Winchester Sun   Tues., 11-13-1928
Lowell, Jas. Russell JAS. RUSSELL LOWELL, one of the most prominent literary men this country has ever produced, is dead.

The Democrat, Wednesday, August 19, 1891.

Lowen, Stanley Cecil The Winchester Sun   Wed., 1-9-1974
Lower, C. B. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 5-23-1924
Lowerey, Mrs. Lucy RIGHT ANGLE-Mrs. Lucy Lowerey, of Clay City, died the 9th inst. Of a complication of diseases.   She was forty years of age and leaves a husband and seven children. The funeral was held at Log Lock church, and interment at same place.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, July 13, 1894.

Lowery, Anderson Right Angle Items-Died, July 30th, Anderson Lowery, son of Garnett Lowery, aged 36 years.   Burial at Log Lick. He leaves a wife and four children.

The Winchester Democrat     Wed., 8-10-1892

Lowery, Austin The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-8, 12-9-1913
Lowery, Everett The Winchester Sun   Fri., 7-15-1927
Lowery, Ex The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-19-1949
Lowery, Garnett Uncle Garnett Lowery, age 84 years, died February 25.

The Semi-Weekly Sun   3-19-1890

Lowery, infant Bloomingdale; Died—Of lung trouble, infant child of Wm. Lowery.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, June 19, 1894

Lowery, John Gilbert The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-21, 8-22-1967
Lowery, Louisa Age 15, she was born in Clark Co., KY, parents were Garnet and Matilda Lowery. She died August 26, 1852 of Flux.

CCKD

Lowery, Millard F. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-20-1945
Lowery, Mrs. Betty Jean The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-12, 11-13-1999
Lowery, Mrs. Ida Belle The Winchester Sun   Fri., 4-23-1948
Lowery, Mrs. Martha E. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 4-14, 4-15-1939
Lowery, Robert Merritt; Died, at his home at Ford on Dec. 30, of pneumonia, Robert Lowery, aged about 43 years. His remains were buried on Thursday in the graveyard at Log Lick church. He leaves several children beside a host of relatives to mourn his loss.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, January 5, 1897

 

Deaths; At his home at Ford, Thursday, Robert Lowry. Burial at Log Lick: funeral services by Rev. M. P. Lowry. He leaves six children.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, January 5, 1897

Lowery, Thomas Right Angle Items-Revs. Neal of Winchester and Prather, of Richmond, preached the funeral of Uncle Thomas Lowery and daughter, Sunday to a large audience.

The Winchester Democrat     Wed., 7-20-1892

Lowlow, John Famous clown dead

John Lowlow, the famous circus clown, died last week at his home in Cincinnati. He was the greatest of his time and had probably caused more people to laugh than any other man that ever lived.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, October 25, 1910

Lownes, Mrs. Louisa C. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 1-4-1929
Lowrey, Anderson On the motion of Anderson Lowrey its ordered that Thomas Potts, Lucien Noble, William Poor and James Gansey or any 3 of them being first sworn do view the nearest and best way to change the road leading from the precinct to the area above iron works beginning at the creek then on the nearest road best way to make the said road and make report thereof to the court.

Order Book 10; P. 170; February Court 1834

Lowrey, James Neil The Winchester Sun   Tues., 6-26-1973
Lowry, Alvin N. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 10-2, 10-3-1996
Lowry, Arthur L. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 2-11, 2-12-1999
Lowry, Charlie R. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 9-20, 9-21-1972
Lowry, Clinton A. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 5-18-1945
Lowry, Elizabeth June (Biby) The Winchester Sun   Fri., 2-4-1994
Lowry, Everett A. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 3-22, 3-23-1961
Lowry, F. M. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 3-19-1920
Lowry, father The Winchester Sun   Thur., 1-28-1915
Lowry, Floyd B. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 12-17, 12-18-1976
Lowry, Floyd Prather Log Lick

Died, on the 6th, Floyd Prather, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Lowry, age about 5 months, of brain trouble. Burial in family graveyard. The family have our heatfelt sympathy.

The Sun-Sentinel   Thur., Sept. 14, 1905

Lowry, Frank The Winchester Sun   Sat., 8-26-1939
Lowry, George L. The Winchester Sun Fri., 4-17-1981
Lowry, Gilbert The Winchester Sun   Wed., 11-19-1919
Lowry, Herschel The Winchester Sun   Tues., 9-7-2010
Lowry, infant Log Lick

Died, March 21, the infant child of Wm. Lowry, Jr. Burial in the family graveyard the following day.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, April 1, 1898

Lowry, James P. The Winchester Sun   Thurs. 8-8-1918
Lowry, James P. The Winchester Sun     Sat., 9-9-1933
Lowry, John H. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-4-1991
Lowry, John S. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-27-1931
Lowry, Keith C. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-14-1966
Lowry, Kenneth Lee The Winchester Sun   Sat., 4-23-1955
Lowry, Leroy C. On the motion of Joseph A. January who made oath thereto as the law directs certificate of administration is granted him for obtaining letters of administration on the estate of Leroy C. Lowry dec. giving security whereupon he together with William C. Sympson entered into and acknowledged their bond in the penalty of $300 conditioned as the law directs.

Order Book 10; P. 190; August Court 1834

 

On the motion of Joseph A. January ordered that Peter Flanagan, Hay Taliaferro, __ Kohlhass and William Ritchie or any 3 of them being first sworn do appraise in current money the slaves if any and personal estate of L. C. Lowry and make report thereof to the court.

Order Book 10; P. 191; August Court 1834

Lowry, Louisa Age 15, female, she was born in Clark County, KY, her parents were Garret and Matilda Lowry, she lived in Powell County, KY, she died in Powell County, KY, August 26, 1852 of flux.

CCKD

Lowry, M. P. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 12-8-1937
Lowry, Maltilda LOG LICK     Died—February 23, Mrs. Maltilda Lowry, of paralysis, aged about 30 years, and on February 25, Uncle Garnette Lowry aged 84 years.

The Democrat, Wednesday, March 19, 1890.

Lowry, Minnie C. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 9-21-1974
Lowry, Mrs. Agnes Meredith The Winchester Sun   Mon., 6-30, 7-1-2008
Lowry, Mrs. Alma Jones The Winchester Sun   Thur., 10-31, 11-1-1968
Lowry, Mrs. Anna Lue The Winchester Sun   Tues., 10-11, 10-12-1988
Lowry, Mrs. Barbara Jean Cuzick The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-30, 3-31-1998
Lowry, Mrs. Billie Several from here attended the funeral of Mrs. Billie Lowry, of Log Lick.

The Sun-Sentinel   Thur., 7-18-1907

Lowry, Mrs. Carrie T. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-5-1965
Lowry, Mrs. Edith Christopher The Winchester Sun   Sat., 8-1-1953
Lowry, Mrs. Ellen Died at her home in this county, March 11th, after a long and lingering complication of diseases. Mrs. Ellen Lowry, aged about 75 years. The funeral was preached at Log Lick church to a large concourse of people the following day, and the remains interred in the graveyard at that place. She leaves six children, among whom is Rev. M. P. Lowry, besides a host of friends and relatives to mourn her loss.   Her husband, Thomas Lowry died 8 years ago. Deceased had been an exemplary member of the Church of Christ for a number of years and died in the full hopes of Christian religion. A singular coincidence of her death is that her oldest daughter, wife of Thos. Adams, of Ruckerville, was born just 56 years ago on the 11th day of March, within one hundred yards of where she died.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, March 17, 1899.

Lowry, Mrs. Esther H. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 7-2, 7-3-2001
Lowry, Mrs. Etta Ximena The Winchester Sun   Fri., 1-6-1939
Lowry, Mrs. Felix Died—Mrs. Felix Lowry, of Bourbon county, died Friday in a Cincinnati hospital. She was the mother of Miss Lucy Lowry, who has frequently visited here.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, July 21, 1899

Lowry, Mrs. Gertrude Parido The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-2-1918
Lowry, Mrs. Goldie Wood The Winchester Sun   Sat., 10-10-1998
Lowry, Mrs. Grace Hutson The Winchester Sun   Thur., 7-31, 8-1-1997
Lowry, Mrs. Hattie The Winchester Sun   Fri., 3-19-1954
Lowry, Mrs. Jenny The Winchester Sun     Sat., 9-9-1933
Lowry, Mrs. Louise Muncie The Winchester Sun   Wed., 8-3, 8-4-1988
Lowry, Mrs. Margaret N. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 11-4-1998
Lowry, Mrs. Mertie Fisher The Winchester Sun   Fri., 12-3, 12-4-1971
Lowry, Mrs. Nancy Brought home for burial

Mrs. Nancy Lowry died at East Hickman, Fayette county, Saturday, aged eighty-four years. The remains were brought to Log Lick, this county, for burial.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, August 23, 1910

 

Ruckerville – Mr. and Mrs. J.F. Gamboe attended the burial of Mrs. Nancy Lowry at Log Lick on Sunday.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, August 26, 1910

 

Athens – Mrs. H.E. Burke and her daughters, Letha and Bessie, were called to East Hickman on account of the death of her mother, Mrs. Nancy Lowry, who passed away before she arrived.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, September 6, 1910

 

Athens – Mrs. Nancy Lowry died August 19th, at her daughter’s Mrs. Nancy Berryman,     at East Hickman, of heart trouble, 84 years of age. The remains were brought to the home at Log Lick for burial, services at the grave by Rev. J.H. Matherly. She was a good Christian woman and to know her was to love her. Her last hours were spent in ease and her last sleep came on her as one who “wraps the drapery about his couch and lies down to pleasant dreams.”

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, September 6, 1910

Lowry, Mrs. Nannie C. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 6-19-1972
Lowry, Mrs. Nelson The Winchester Sun   Wed., 10-14, 10-15-1931
Lowry, Mrs. Ollie Kerr The Winchester Sun   Thur., 2-2, 2-3-1967
Lowry, Mrs. Robert LOG LICK-Died at Clay City, wife of Robert Lowry. Funeral Log Lick by Rev. Marcum, and interment in family cemetery.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, July 20,1894.

Lowry, Mrs. Ruby Jordan The Winchester Sun   Tues., 8-20, 8-21-1996
Lowry, Mrs. Sadie Watts The Winchester Sun   Tues., 2-21, 2-22-1984
Lowry, Mrs. Sallie Died, near here, on July 1st, of consumption Mrs. Sallie Lowry wife of Wm. Lowry. She was a consistent member of Log Lick church and beloved by all who knew her. She leaves a husband and six children.

The Winchester Sun-Sentinel Thursday, July 11, 1907

 

Died at her home near here Monday, July 1st. Mrs. Sallie Lowry, of Consumption. She had been sick for a long time. She leaves a husband and six children besides a host of friends and relatives to mourn her loss. She was a good, Christian woman who was loved by all who knew her.

The Winchester Sun-Sentinel Thursday, July 11, 1907

 

Several from here attended the funeral of Mrs. Billie Lowry, of Log Lick.

The Winchester Sun-Sentinel Thursday, July 18, 1907

Lowry, Mrs. Sidney The Winchester Sun   Fri., 6-10-1921
Lowry, Mrs. Virginia E. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 3-10, 3-11-1931
Lowry, Mrs. W. T. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 2-2, 2-3, 2-4-1916
Lowry, Nancy Belle The Winchester Sun   Fri., 2-6, 2-7-1970
Lowry, Nathan (Doc) The Winchester Sun   Mon., 7-10-1944
Lowry, Nelson The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-9-1931
Lowry, Oliver H. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-23, 8-24-1982
Lowry, Othel (Shorty) The Winchester Sun   Wed., 3-2, 3-3-1988
Lowry, Robert The Winchester Sun   Fri., 9-24-1971
Lowry, Russell The Winchester Sun   Thur., 11-7-1968
Lowry, Stanley H. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 5-28-1954
Lowry, Strother J. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 5-14-1960
Lowry, Taylor Harding Sr. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 12-28, 12-29-1960
Lowry, Thomas Revolutionary War Soldier

List of Revolutionary Soldiers Who Were Citizens Of Clark County, Kentucky

Compiled By Mrs. William D. Clark, Of Hart Chapter, D.A.R.

Chairman Of Revolutionary Soldiers Graves

Winchester, Clark County, Kentucky, Library

Research Room

Lowry, Thomas Died at her home in this county, March 11th, after a long and lingering complication of diseases. Mrs. Ellen Lowry, aged about 75 years. The funeral was preached at Log Lick church to a large concourse of people the following day, and the remains interred in the graveyard at that place. She leaves six children, among whom is Rev. M. P. Lowry, besides a host of friends and relatives to mourn her loss.   Her husband, Thomas Lowry died 8 years ago. Deceased had been an exemplary member of the Church of Christ for a number of years and died in the full hopes of Christian religion. A singular coincidence of her death is that her oldest daughter, wife of Thos. Adams, of Ruckerville, was born just 56 years ago on the 11th day of March, within one hundred yards of where she died.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, March 17, 1899.

Lowry, Thomas Taken to the asylum

Thomas Lowry, a white man, aged about fifty years, and living in Goodes precinct, was tried Wednesday before Judge Evans and a jury and was adjudged to be of unsound mind. He was taken to the asylum by officers John Bedford and Albert Tanner. Some years ago he received a blow on the head and since then has been subject to fits.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, April 23, 1909

 

Back to the asylum

Some months ago Thomas Lowry, of this county, was tried before a jury, adjudged a lunatic and was sent to the asylum. He stayed there for awhile and was sent home as cured. Lately he became violent again and Saturday was taken back.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, June 29, 1909

Lowry, Thomas The last will and testament of Thomas Lowry dec. was produced in open court and proven according to law by the oath of Pleasant Bush witness thereto subscribed and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 11; P. 468; December Court 1846

 

Pleasant Bush the executor named in the last will and testament of Thomas Lowry dec. came personally into court and refused to qualify as the executor aforesaid.

Order Book 11; P. 469; December Court 1846

 

Satisfactory evidence is exhibited to the court that Thomas Lowry was a pensioner of the United States at the rate of seventy dollars per annum and that he is the identical person named in an original certificate of pension produced to the court of which the following is a true copy to wit

War department Revolutionary Claim

I certify that in conformity with the law of the State of Kentucky who was a private in the army of the Revolution is entitled to receive seventy dollars and ~ cents per   annum during his natural life. Commencing on the 4th of March 1831 and payable semiannually on the 4th of March and 4th of September in every year- Given at the War Office of the United States this second day of October one thousand eight hundred and thirty three. John Robb acting secretary of war examined and counter signed J. L. Edwards commissioner of pensions.

Order Book 12; P. 16; April Court 1847

 

It was also satisfactory therein to the court that said Thomas Lowry was a resident of the County of Clarke in the State of Kentucky and that he died in said county and state on the 21st day of November 1846 and left a widow named Nancy Lowry who resides in Clark County Kentucky.

Order Book 12; P. 16; April Court 1847

Lowry, Vernon The Winchester Sun   Thur., 8-29, 8-30-2002
Lowry, W. M. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-17-1951
Lowry, William The Winchester Sun   Sat., 8-29-1931
Lowry, William A. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 1-10-1994
Lowry, Wm. Log Lick

Mr. Burke, of Versailles is visiting his mother-in-law, Mrs. Nancy Lowry and while here erected a nice tomb stone to the grave of Wm. Lowry, who died May 18?2.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., May 15, 1903

Loy, Mrs. Esther Hall The Winchester Sun   Fri., 10-15, 10-26-1974
Loy, Mrs. Jean Courtney The Winchester Sun   Sat., 6-21-2003
Loy, N. R. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-7-1964
Loy, Robert Kinney The Winchester Sun   Wed., 9-3, 9-4-2003
Loyall, Larry The Winchester Sun   Thur., 7-26-1990
Loyd, John M. JOHN M. LOYD, who rented Mrs. Surratt’s tavern at Surrattsville, in 1864, was a chief witness against the Lincoln murder conspirators, died in Washington City last week. His testimony told fearfully against Mrs. Surratt, though he always maintained her innocence of the lot to murder. Monday before the assassination Loyd met Mrs. Surratt who told him that the weapons concealed by John H. Surratt and others would be wanted soon. On the fatal night Booth and Harold called at Loyd’s place for the weapons, Harold going in for them and for whisky while Booth, with a broken leg, sat in the dark on the white horse which was shot a week after among the scrub pines of the lower Potomac to silence his neighing.

The Democrat, Wednesday, January 18, 1893.

Loyd, Wm. Wm. Loyd, Bourbon county; died in Camp Douglas.

The Winchester Sun-Sentinel Thursday, April 4, 1907

Luby, Mrs. C. C. Wife Murderer Pays the Penalty

Blakely, Ga., Feb.—The hanging of C. C. Luby, convicted of the murder of his wife, took place here Friday. The pardon board refused his application for pardon.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, February 22, 1898

Lucas, Agee (Pete) The Winchester Sun   Mon., 1-26, 1-27-1948
Lucas, Arthur The Winchester Sun   Wed., 8-18, 8-19-1954
Lucas, Brian Thomas The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-10-2003
Lucas, Chester B. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 1-11-1929
Lucas, child The Winchester Sun   Wed., 2-25, 3-18-1914
Lucas, Clifford The Winchester Sun   Sat., 5-4-1996
Lucas, Daniel Franklin Jr. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 8-15-1968
Lucas, daughter Sick Child Burned To Death

Mayking, Ky., Nov. 28

A 7-year-old invalid daughter of Rev. Arch Lucas, Baptist divine, of Camp Branch Creek, northwest of here, was burned to death during the absence of her father and mother.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Dec. 3, 1901

Lucas, Ed The Winchester News Mon., 1-1-1912
Lucas, Elmer II The Winchester Sun Fri., 2-14-1913
Lucas, Estill B. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-20-1939
Lucas, Francis The Winchester Sun   Wed., 11-13, 11-14-1968
Lucas, Harry F. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 12-27-1988
Lucas, Hugh Big Reward Offered

Frankfort, Ky., June 27

The governor Wednesday increased the reward offered for the capture of the unknown murderers of Hugh Lucas, in Hickman county, from $250 to $500 each.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., July 2, 1901

Lucas, J. W. DIED-Capt. J. W. Lucas, of Paris, died Monday aged fifty-five years. He was a leading lawyer and was a Captain in the Confederate army.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, December 14, 1894.

 

The Christian church at Paris now has but one Elder. In the last six months two J. W. Lucas and J. V. Lovely, have died and Capt. J. M. Thomas has resigned.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, January 25, 1895

Lucas, Jack The Winchester Sun   Tues., 5-12, 5-13-1964
Lucas, James E. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 7-22-1995
Lucas, Jeff The indictments against Joe Newton for killing Jeff Lucas three years ago, was filed in the Circuit Court at Frankfort. There has been two former mistrials.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, January 8, 1897

Lucas, Jeffrey The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-10, 3-11-2003
Lucas, John Inventory and appraisal of the estate of John Lucas decd. ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 4; P. 457; April Court 1811

Lucas, John The East bound express train, Monday night, ran over John Lucas about a mile east of town. The injured man was taken to Mt. Sterling where he died during the night. He was drinking heavily which was probably the cause of his death. But little could be learned concerning him, but it is believed he is from Richmond.

The Winchester Democrat     Wed. 6-25-1890

 

The body of John Lucas, who was killed on Monday night of last week by the express train near this city was brought back here Wednesday and Coroner Boone held an inquest over it, the result of which was the complete exoneration of the road from all blame. Conductor Hillbruner who had charge of the train has killed twenty-eight persons in this manner.

The Democrat, Wednesday, July 2, 1890.

 

John Lucas, of Newtown, in his will left half of 300 acres, worth $59,000, to his sister, one fourth to the Garth school at Paris, and the other fourth to the Midway orphans’ school.

The Winchester Democrat; Wednesday, October 15, 1890

 

SOME time ago John Lucas was run over and killed near the city limits by an east-bound train.   His widow brought suit for $ 25,000 damages. The case was called in Common Pleas Court, but was continued on account of the illness of an important witness.

The Democrat, Wednesday, September 23, 1891.

Lucas, John H. N. Calmes executor vs. Alice Calmes executor

The death of the defendant John Lucas as executor. Alice Calmes decd. is now suggested and cause is continued for reviver.

Order Book 18; P. 203; November Court 1882

Lucas, Joseph J. A. Ramsey, auctioneer, reports the sale of Joseph Lucas, deceased, in Scott county Thursday as well a fair prices. Thirty fat cattle of 1350lbs.

The Democrat, Wednesday, November 4, 1891.

Lucas, Lawrence The Winchester Sun   Sat., 7-25-1964
Lucas, Lee The Winchester Sun Thur., 12-9-1920
Lucas, Miss_______ Age 16, female, her father was Joseph Lucas, she died in Winchester, KY, she died December 8, 1857, she died of typhoid fever.

CCKD

Lucas, Mr._________ WALKER JAMISON, Sheriff of Lee county, has received a telegram from the Marshal of Iowa Park, Texas, that Wick Gallant, who killed Lucas in Lee county, last May, had been arrested and placed in prison there. Geo Drake has gone to bring him home.

The Democrat, Wednesday, November 18, 1891.

Lucas, Mrs. Anna Bell The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-14, 5-15, 5-16-1984
Lucas, Mrs. Bernardine Morton The Winchester Sun   Tues., 2-14-1989
Lucas, Mrs. Carolyn Ann

Branham

The Winchester Sun   Wed., 2-24, 2-25-2010
Lucas, Mrs. Corda Salendar The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-18-1932
Lucas, Mrs. Dollie Mae The Winchester Sun   Sat., 6-16, 6-18-2001
Lucas, Mrs. Edna The Winchester Sun   Tues., 12-27, 12-28-1994
Lucas, Mrs. Eliza Sams The Winchester Sun   Fri., 2-20, 2-21-1970
Lucas, Mrs. F. W. Mrs. F.W. Lucas died at the Good Samaritan Hospital at three o’clock Saturday morning after undergoing an operation Friday afternoon from which she never rallied. Besides her husband she leaves two sons and three daughters.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, March 27, 1908

Lucas, Mrs. Lillie The Winchester Sun   Sat., 2-24-1951
Lucas, Mrs. Maude The Winchester Sun   Fri., 5-3, 5-4-1968
Lucas, Mrs. Pearl Colwell The Winchester Sun   Fri., 5-10, 5-11-1963
Lucas, Mrs. Regena Faye The Winchester Sun   Thur., 9-3-2009
Lucas, Paul Johnson The Winchester Sun   Thur., 4-18-1974
Lucas, prisoner Two prisoners in the penitentiary became involved in a fight Sunday, one armed with a razor and the other with a putty knife. Bellmeyer, one of them, was fatally cut in the abdomen. Lucas, the other, was beaten so as to be unrecognizable, and another convict, Johnson, who tried to part them, was struck on the head by a brick.   All three are fatally wounded.

The Democrat, Wednesday, September 9, 1891.

Lucas, Ronald Wayne The Winchester Sun   Thur., 10-14-1943
Lucas, Samuel Stabbing At Richmond

Samuel Lucas, a drummer, son of John Lucas, of Berea, was perhaps fatally stabbed by Anse Harris, a saloon keeper, of Richmond. Lucas, according to witnesses testimony, was in Harris’ place violently abusing negro Democrats, and Harris ordered him out. Later they met, and it is alleged that Lucas made a feint to draw a weapon, when Harris stabbed him in the back. Both men were drinking. Harris gave $5,000 bond.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Dec. 14, 1900

Lucas, Thomas Age 28, male, he was married, he was a farmer, he was born in Clark County, KY, his parents were Theodore and Emma Lucas, his father was born in Fayette County, KY, his mother was born in Clark County, KY, he lived in Clark County, KY, he died in Clark County, KY, he died August 15, 1861, he died of an accident.

CCKD

Lucas, Tom The Winchester Sun   Wed., 10-5-1932
Lucas, Tom Jr. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 1-21, 1-22, 1-23, 1-25, 1-26, 1-28, 2-4, 4-23, 4-26, 4-27-1932
Lucas, W. M. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 12-29-1956
Lucas, Wesley The Winchester Sun   Wed., 1-11-1922
Lucas, William Goebel The Winchester Sun   Sat., 10-26, 10-28-1963
Luce, Mrs. Edith The Winchester Sun   Fri., 4-13-1934
Luck, daughter Child Burned To Death

Bowling Green, Ky., Feb. 8

The 7-year-old daughter of Will Luck, who lives 14 miles from this place, was burned to death.   The little girl was sitting before the fire, and her clothes became ignited. She was burned to a crisp before help could reach her.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Feb. 13, 1900

Luck, Gibbs The Winchester Sun   Wed., 2-18-1925
Luck, Mrs. Martha Emily The Winchester Sun   Tues., 3-2-2010
Luck, Russell The Winchester Sun   Wed., 5-8-1996
Luckett, Leona The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-30-1925
Luckett, Sam J. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 10-28-1944
Luckie, Mrs. Mary At Mexico, Mo., Aug. 10, Mrs. Mary Luckie, aged 92 years. She was a native of this county, having left here in 1831.

The Democrat, Wednesday, September 7, 1892.

Luckie, Mrs. Sallie Death Of An Ex-Clarkite

The Mexico Mo., correspondence of a St. Louis paper last week contained the following item:   “Mrs. Sallie Luckie, one of the oldest residents of Audrain county, died Monday at her home near this city at the age of nearly ninety-four years, she having been born in Clark county, Ky., on June 20, 1808. Deceased was married in 1837, and moved to Audrain county about 1850. He husband preceded her to the grave about nine years ago, and the following children survive: Mrs. Quackenbush, of Colorado, John Luckie of St. Louis, Mrs. Martha Holliday, William Luckie, Robert Luckie, Mrs. Skates, Mrs. R. E. French and Miss Clemmie Luckie, all of near this city.”

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Feb. 18, 1902

Lucus, Brain David The Winchester Sun   Fri., 1-24, 1-25-2003
Luddiake, George Geo. Luddiake, a nephew of Geo. Richter, died Friday in Cincinnati. Mr. Richter and family attended the funeral.

The Democrat, Wednesday, March 2, 1892.

Luddington, Claude The Winchester Sun   Wed., 9-12-1934
Luddington, Grant The Winchester Sun   Wed., 9-12-1934
Ludlow, M. B. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 6-15-1937
Ludwig, Charles J. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 5-12, 5-13-2009
Ludwig, John John Ludwig Is Dead

Louisville, Ky., Oct. 18

John Ludwig died at the city hospital. A week ago, in a fit of despondency because he was growing old, he cut his throat with a razor. His windpipe was completely severed, but notwithstanding this he lived, and seemingly grew better. The wound was dressed, and had it not been for his extreme age of nearly 80, he would probably have recovered.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Oct. 24, 1899

Ludwig, Mrs. Eva E. (Nanny) The Winchester Sun   Thur., 5-29-1997
Luga, Frank K. The following special from Chicago refers to a couple of well known railroad men who lived here for a considerable time: “As a sequel to the battle at Lamont between the quarry strikers and the forces on the canal contract, on June 12th, a coroner’s jury yesterday held Foreman C. H. Hocker and J. A. Bibb, of Mason, Hoge & Co. work, to the grand jury to answer to the charge of murder in shooting Frank K. Luga, the Santa Fee switchman who was accidentally shot.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, June 21, 1893

Luigart, George Leaves Big Estate

Lexington, Ky., May2

The will of George Luigart was admitted to probate by Judge Bullock. He bequeathes his estate, amounting to nearly $100,000, to his family.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., May 4, 1906

Luing, Mrs. Elaine M. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 8-28-2001
Lukins, Joel Died—The Maysville Public Ledger tells of the following somewhat unusual occurrences: “The late Joel Lukins, who died near Mt. Gilead at the age of eighty-two, was born and   raised in the house where he died. Two of his near neighbors, Messrs. Robert Turner and Jerry DeBell both of whom died at an advanced age, also died in the houses where they were born and had always lived.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, August 21, 1894

Luman, Daniel L. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-22, 10-23-1923
Luman, infant Died—Sunday morning, infant child of R. R. Luman. The remains were carried to Flemingsburg for interment.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, August 21, 1894

Luman, J. T. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 10-7, 10-9-1916

Clark County Republican   Fri. 10-13-1916

Luman, Joel T. Deaths

Joel T. Luman, aged about seventy years, a well known citizen of Mt. Carmel, Fleming county, died at his home Friday. Deceased was physically one of the largest men in that county, a special coffin being necessary for his burial. He was the father of Mr. J. T. Luman, of this city.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Oct. 30, 1903

Luman, John The Winchester Sun,   Thurs., 2-24-1921
Luman, Mrs. Dora Lee The Winchester Sun   Sat., 6-7, 6-9-1941
Luman, Mrs. Harriet N. Deaths

Mrs. Harriet N. Luman, aged 73, died at her home near Mt. Carmel, Fleming county, July 28.   Funeral and burial July 30. The deceased was the mother of Mr. J. T. Luman, of this city, and a good christian woman.

The Sun-Sentinel   Thur., Aug., 4, 1904

Luman, Mrs. Ida M. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 10-18-1935
Luman, William McKinley (Bill) The Winchester Sun Thur., 10-15, 10-16-1981
Lumpkins, George The Winchester Sun   Tues., 11-27-1934
Lumpkins, Mrs. Geneva Faye The Winchester Sun   Sat., 8-5-1995
Lumpkins, Mrs. Mary Belle The Winchester Sun   Fri., 9-20, 9-21-1968
Lumpkins, Pearl The Winchester Sun Wed., 3-4-1981
Lumsford, George The Winchester Sun   Thur., 4-29-1920
Lunatic Asylum In the afternoon we visited the Lunatic Asylum, Dr. Redwine the courteous Superintendent took us through most of the wards. The Hospital seems to be kept as nice and clean as it is possible to do with this class of patients. There are about 1,000 inmates at this time, and only four doctors to give this large number medical attention, within our opinions not at all sufficient. The building is not only full, most wretched and pitiable looking situation somewhat through curiosity and we have no desire whatever to repeat our visit.   There were 277 admitted last year.   Fayette contributed 34 of this number, Franklin the next highest sent 15, Clark county furnished 9, Jefferson in which Louisville is situated only sent 1. I am unable to say why more people go crazy in Fayette county than any other county in the State as shown by this report. The State makes an allowance of $12,000 per month for defraying the expenses of the institution. There are quite a large number in the Asylum that should be in our county poor house, or at home with their families.   There is no doubt in the world of this fact. There are scores of old people here, who are only suffering from that mental decline incidental to old age, and who should be cared for by their relatives or respective counties from which they are sent. The burden of care of their indigent is encouraged by the present jury system and Dr. Redwine very properly suggests that the system of trial by jury be changed to a “Lunacy Commission” consisting of three reputable physicians in each county. He says to compel a person to go before a jury of men with sometimes dozens of curious spectators and undergo the ordeal of a trial in order to be adjudged insane is alike repulsive to both patient and friends. In all cases a trial should be had before those most competent to render a just verdict and it is an unquestionable fact that a physician is better qualified for this service than an ordinary layman. Among no class of patients are so much skill experience and judgment required as there are in treating the insane and the physicians employed on account of their qualification and fitness and not on account of any party or political affiliation. Besides being a learned physician and Christian gentleman the doctor should be kind and prompt to respond to the needs of distressed people.   To come up to the full measure of requirement the doctor should be as wise as Solomon, meek as Moses, patient as Job, as loving as John and as strong as Sampson. We only mention, but of course don’t expect this high standard of qualification.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday,   July 12, 1901.

Lund, Freddie The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-5-1931
Lundergan, son The two-year-old son of John Lundergan was killed at Myall Station, near Paris, last week, by the train coming from Parks Hill Camp meeting.

The Democrat, Wednesday, August 24, 1892.

Lunsford, Allen Allen Lunsford committed suicide at Jackson by shooting himself. The supposed unfaithfulness of his young wife caused the deed.

The Winchester Democrat     Wed., 6-1-1892

Lunsford, Danny H. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 11-2, 11-4-1996
Lunsford, Earl The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-22-1937
Lunsford, Geo. JAS. HILTON, who was under indictment for the murder of Geo. Lunsford, of Estill county, died in that county Tuesday.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday December 14, 1894

Lunsford, John The Winchester Sun   Wed., 6-1, 6-8-1921
Lunsford, Luther The Winchester Sun   5-14, 6-14-1928
Lunsford, Mrs. Donna Louise

Helmburg

The Winchester Sun   Thur., 1-20-2005

Scobee Funeral Home Web Site Tues., 1-18-2005

Lunsford, Mrs. Joyce The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-27-1976
Lunsford, Mrs. Lona Mae

Spurlock

The Winchester Sun Sat., 1-22-1983
Luoma, Carl Elmer The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-26-2001
Lupien, Joseph III The Winchester Sun   Sat., 9-12, 9-18-2009
Lush, Charles Clinton III (Chuck) The Winchester Sun   Tues., 12-27-2005
Lusher, Nellie Near Bowling Green, Edw. Cowles and his sweetheart Miss Nellie Lusher, suicided together by drowning, in preference to being separated in life. They had just returned from a lawn fete.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, July 16, 1897.

Lusk, Lucille The Winchester Sun   Wed., 4-5-1967
Lusk, Mrs. Anne K. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-25-1960
Lusk, Mrs. Elizabeth Rhodus The Winchester Sun   Sat., 3-20-1993
Lusk, Sam At Catlettsburg the jury brought in a verdict of $10,000 damages against the Ashland Coal and Iron Railroad for killing Whitt Lusk last summer, Sam Lusk was killed at the same time and a similar suit for damages on his behalf is pending.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, May 24, 1893

Lusk, Samuel Motion of John Gray and Patrick Gray for letters of administration of the estate of Samuel Lusk decd. is granted with Archibald Bristoco and John Crockett as security.

Order Book 4; P. 531; November Court 1801

 

Order the appraisal of slaves if any and personnel estate of Samuel Lusk decd.

Order Book 4; P. 531-532; November Court 1801

 

Polly Lusk infant orphan of Samuel Lusk made choice of Edwin Berry as her guardian with James Young and Edwin Young security.

Order Book 4; P. 52; September Court 1805

 

Ordered that James Crockett, Daniel Harrison, James Young, and Thomas Henry settle and adjust all accounts with administrators of the estate of Samuel Lusk decd. and make report.

Order Book 4; P. 68; November Court 1805

 

Settlement with administrators of the estate of Samuel Lusk decd. returned and ordered to be recorded.

Order Book 4; P. 85; January Court 1806

 

Patrick Gray appointed guardian to David, James, Fanny, Cyrus and Nancy Lusk orphans of Samuel Lusk decd. with Ed Young, James Young and Samuel Mile as security.

Order Book 4; P. 88; January Court 1806

Lusk, Whitt At Catlettsburg the jury brought in a verdict of $10,000 damages against the Ashland Coal and Iron Railroad for killing Whitt Lusk last summer, Sam Lusk was killed at the same time and a similar suit for damages on his behalf is pending.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, May 24, 1893

Luster, Walter The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-14-1929
Lutes, Aas The Winchester Sun   Wed., 8-31-1921
Lutes, Alex Irvine The Winchester Sun   Sat., 9-10-1988
Lutes, Charles Buckner The Winchester Sun   Thur., 2-5-1942
Lutes, Dillard Homicide At Pine Grove.

Dillard Lutes Shot and Instantly Killed by Minor B. Wilson.

A tragedy resulting in the instant death of Dillard Lutes at the hands of Minor B. Wilson, occurred near Pine Grove at a late hour Thursday afternoon. Both men were farmers and resided near each other on the farm of Dan Scott. A day or two previous to the killing Wilson had some slight difficulty with a man in his employ but nothing serious grew out of it. Lutes espoused the cause of the other man and talked considerably about it.

The night previous to the killing, Lutes and two other men went to the house of Wilson after the latter had retired and raised a disturbance. Wilson endeavored to pacify them and failing to do this drove them away. The visitors had been drinking and were very offensive. Wilson was sober and, it is said, does not drink at all.

Thursday, Wilson and a couple of his hands were at work in the field shucking corn when Lutes and two other men, Oliver and Gumm, came into the field and renewed the quarrel. They had been to Athens, where whiskey is sold, and had evidently been drinking. Lutes and Oliver began to use violent language and, although Wilson had taken his shotgun to the field in anticipation of probable trouble, he called his men and left the field going towards home. Lutes and Oliver followed with threatening actions, and after repeated warnings Wilson fired; both loads struck Lutes in the breast killing him at once. Wilson also shot him three times with a pistol. Oliver, who was with Lutes ran up and took a pistol from the hand of the dead man and fired several shots at Wilson and party but without effect.

Coroner Wills was notified and went at once to the scene. When he arrived there several hours after dark, the body of the dead man lay on his face in the road where he fell. He summoned a jury and by the fitful glare of a few lanterns, held an inquest, which resulted in the following verdict:

“We the jury find the dead body before us to be that of Dillard Lutes and he came to his death by a gun shot wound in the hands of Minor B. Wilson in self defense.

Wm. McEwan, T. J. Harris, L. T. Mansfield, Jas. Mullins, Jas, Walden, F. J. Sayre.”

Wilson came to town and gave himself up. The charge being murder the case was not bailable, but he was placed in charge of the Sheriff, being nominally in custody but really free. The examining trial was fixed for yesterday morning, but as some of the Commonwealth’s witnesses were absent the case was put off until Monday.

Lutes leaves a wife and several small children. The remains were carries to Lee county where he formerly lived, for interment. Wilson, who did the killing, is also a man of family.

Public opinion seems to justify Wilson in what he did.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, November 8, 1898

 

Acquitted.

Minor B. Wilson, who shot and instantly killed Dillard Lutes at Pine Grove about two weeks ago, was tried before Judge Evans Tuesday and was acquitted. The killing was a clear case of self defense and the dead man brought his fate upon himself.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, November 18, 1898

Lutes, Ernest Jones The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-28-1992
Lutes, Henry The Winchester Sun   Fri., 5-31, 6-1-1968
Lutes, John The Winchester Sun   Tues., 4-14-1987
Lutes, Kenneth Shane The Winchester Sun   Thur., 5-4, 5-5-1972
Lutes, Mrs. Alma The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-8-2008
Lutes, Mrs. Bessie Hackworth The Winchester Sun   Mon., 7-30-1962
Lutes, Mrs. Cora Mae Hall The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-24-1997
Lutes, Mrs. Maggie Rose The Winchester Sun   Tues., 5-5, 5-6-1964
Lutes, Mrs. Thelma Waller The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-25, 11-26, 11-28-1994
Lutes, Roy The Winchester Sun   Wed., 7-28-1993
Lutes, Russell C. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 7-15-2002
Lutes, Ward The Winchester Sun   Fri., 8-10-1928
Luttle, Sarah Age 2 weeks, female, she was single, she was born in Clark County, KY, her parents were John and Eliza Luttle, her parents were both born in Clark County, KY, she lived in Clark County, KY, she died in Clark County, KY, she died November 5, 1876, she died of hydrocephalus.

CCKD

Luttrell, Anna Avneal The Winchester Sun   Wed., 12-21-1938
Luttrell, Mrs. Bonnie Woolcott The Winchester Sun   Mon., 5-8-1967
Luttrell, Mrs. Sue Sinkhorn The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-13-1999
Lutz, Charles                       AA Fatally Stabbed – Middlesborough, Ky., Nov.2 – Chas. Lutz, colored, received knife wound which will probably result in death. Honston King has been arrested.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday November 11, 1897

Lutz, Fred Mr. Henry Biehn, returned from Ripley, OH., on Friday evening, where he was called by the death of his relative, Fred Lutz.

The Winchester Democrat     Wed., 7-3-1889

Lutz, Mrs. J. L. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 12-24-1964
Luxmore, Charles E. Sr. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-23-2006
Luxmore, Mrs. Edythe The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-10-1997
Luxon, Ballard H. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-2-1923
Luxon, Mrs. Mayme Smith The Winchester Sun   Thur., 10-7-1954
Luxon, Mrs. Sarah Ballard The Winchester Sun   Wed., 2-29-1928
Luxon, W. E. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 2-3-1955
Luxton, T.C. Lexington, Ky., – T.C. Luxton, 66, a retired coal dealer, was found dead in bed at his home here. He was the father of Thomas and Wilgus Luxton, well known to the drug   trade of Lexington and Central Kentucky.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, January 11, 1910

Luzon, Thomas The Winchester Sun   Fri., 2-10-1933
Lyddan, Thomas The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-20-1958
Lyddane, C. E. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 8-17-1917
Lyddane, Mrs. Fannie Belle

Bailey

The Winchester Sun   Wed., 12-12-1956
Lyddane, Mrs. Geo. A. Died – At her home at Harveyville, Kansas, Mrs. Geo. A. Lyddane. Mr. Lyddane is a native of this county and is a brother to C.E. Lyddane, of this city.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, February 4, 1896

Lydener, Martin James H. Lydener vs. Martin Lydener’s Admin. &c ………….Equity

……papers removed by change of venue from Montgomery Circuit Court and filed …..

Order Book 12; P. 98; May Court 1865

 

………..continued

Order Book 12; P. 214; July Court 1865

Lydick, Jacob Jacob Lydick, a venerable citizen of Fayette county, got up in his sleep and in attempting to light a lamp was fatally burned.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, April, 19, 1895

Lydy, Mrs. Ethelyn The Winchester Sun   Thur., 5-27-1954
Lyin, Mrs. Mary Wallis The Winchester Sun   Sat., 5-2-1936
Lykens, James The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-23-1914
Lykin, Chas. Killed at Richmond

Chas. Lykin, a railroad man, was killed Saturday night in a peculiar manner. In company with Preston Lacy, he was crossing a big trestle near the city, and in a short time Lacy returned and said Lykins had been killed. He said they met a party of negroes on the trestle and in an altercation that ensued, Lykins was thrown from the trestle, a distance of thirty feet. He was instantly killed, his skull being crushed. Being a stranger Lacy did not recognize any of the negroes and no arrests have been made. The body of Lykins was taken to his home in Morgan county for burial.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, August 31, 1906

Lykins Family All in the Family.

Judge William Lykins, who died in 1892 at a ripe old age, says the Caney Valley Courier, was ordained a minister of the hard-shell Baptist faith at the age of eighteen, was one of the first justices of the peace of this county, and was Morgan’s first County Judge, serving two terms. He baptized his grandfather, preached his mother’s funeral, and performed the marriage ceremony that made Miss Hannah Ratliff his stepmother.   Uncle Dudley Lykins, aged fifty-five, the youngest son of the Judge, and a resident of this place, made his mother’s coffin and assisted in making his father’s, and he and four brothers and one brother-in-law acted as pall-bearers at both funerals. Uncle Dudley has also made the caskets in which were buried one of his own children, a daughter-in-law and seven grandchildren. The coffins were all made of black walnut.

The Winchester Sun, Tuesday, July 23, 1900.

Lykins, Charles The Winchester Sun   Wed., 6-11, 6-12-2003
Lykins, Charles M. (Charlie) Charles M. Lykins

Charles M. “Charlie” Lykins, 46, of Naples, Fla., husband of Karen Falcione Lykins, died Sunday as a result of injuries sustained in the crash of Comair Flight 5191 near Blue Grass Airport in Lexington.

A native of Clark County, he was the son of Mary Forbes Lykins of Naples, formerly of Winchester, and the late Charles L. Lykins. He was a graduate of the University of Florida with a bachelor’s degree in business and was co-owner of Lykins Sign Company in Naples. He held his private pilot’s license and was an avid golfer.

Other survivors include a daughter, Ashlee Lykins of Naples; a son, Alexander Lykins of Naples; two brothers, Pete and Tony Lykins of Naples; two sisters, Teresa Gilbert of Spring Hill, Tenn., and Mary Lee Hummer of Glen Allen, VA; two aunts and an uncle, Brenda and Don McMurry and Linda Centers of Winchester; and several nieces and nephews and cousins.

A memorial Mass will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday at the St. William Catholic Church, 750 Seagate Drive, Naples, Fla. Memorials may take the form of contributions to the Naples High Athletic Department, c/o The Orion Bank, 2150 Goodlette Road, North Naples, Fla. 34102.

Rolan G. Taylor Funeral Home is in charge of local arrangements.

The guest book is at Legacy.com

The Winchester Sun Wednesday 8-30-2006

 

A Memorial Mass for Charles M. “Charlie” Lykins, 46, of Naples, Fla., husband of Karen Falcione Lykins, will be held at 10 a. m. Saturday at the St. William Catholic Church, 750 Seagate Drive, Naples, Fla.

Lykins, nephew of Brenda and Don McCurry and Linda Centers, all of Winchester, died Sunday as a result of injuries sustained in the crash of Conair Flight 5191 near Bluegrass Airport in Lexington.

Memorials may take the form of contributions to the Naples High School Athletic Department, c/o The Orion Bank, 2150 Goodlette Road, North Naples, Fl. 34102.

Rolan G. Taylor Funeral Home is in charge of local arrangements.

The guest book is at Legacy.com.

The Winchester Sun Fri. 9-1-2006

 

A memorial Mass will be held at 10 a. m. today at the St. William Catholic Church, 750 Seagate Drive, Naples, Fla., for Charles M. “Charlie” Lykins, 46, of Naples, Fla. Lykins, husband of Karen Falcione Lykins, died Sunday as a result of injuries sustained in the crash of Comair Flight 5191 near Bluegrass Airport in Lexington.

Memorials may take the form of contributions to the Naples High Athletic Department, c/o The Orion Bank, 2150 Goodtree Road, North Naples, Fla. 34102.

Rolan G. Taylor Funeral Home is in charge of local arrangements.

The guest book is at Legacy.com.

The Winchester Sun Sat., 9-2-2006

Lykins, Dennie C. The Winchester Sun   Tues., 3-1-1983
Lykins, Donald Eugene The Winchester Sun   Fri., 1-6-1989
Lykins, Dorsa Bryan The Winchester Sun   Wed., 7-25-1962
Lykins, Frank A Reign Of Terror.

Desperate Fights Between Two Factions at Caney, Ky.

Caney, Ky., Nov. 18.—This little town was in a state of siege Monday night on account of a fight between the Frisbee and Mans factions, which has been going on at intervals for the last 21 hours. Sunday the child of Bob Frisbee was buried in this county. Kelley and Bob Mans and Matau Howard, enemies of Sam Frisbee and Frank and Al Lykins were at the cemetery and began raising a disturbance. Frisbee’s friends protested. The Mans boys walked outside the graveyard and dared the Lykins boys to follow. Frisbee and some friends started with the Lykins boys for the hotel by another route when the Mans began shooting.

The Frisbees covered their retreat with revolvers and the Howard-Mans faction fired at them at long range. One or two spectators were slightly wounded and one of the Mans boys received a bullet in his shoulder. Frank Lykins was shot in the abdomen.

After reaching the house Frisbee and his friends stationed themselves at the windows and began firing rapidly at their enemies when the Howard-Mans faction retreated. An hour later they returned reinforced by several friends and riddled the hotel with bullets.

In the meantime Lykins and Frisbee had escaped to the mountains on horseback to alarm the neighborhood. Both sides are heavily armed. Frank Lykins will die and Kelley Mans is dangerously wounded. Both factions include men prominent in the   affairs of the county. The town has no protection excepting from the county officers who are powerless because of the standing of the participants in the battle. No arrests have been made, and each hour it is feared will bring on a renewal of the encounter.

The Winchester, Democrat, Friday, November 21, 1902.

 

A Reign Of Terror.

Desperate Fights Between Two Factions at Caney, Ky.

Caney, Ky., Nov. 18.—This little town was in a state of siege Monday night on account of a fight between the Frisbee and Mans factions, which has been going on at intervals for the last 21 hours. Sunday the child of Bob Frisbee was buried in this county. Kelley and Bob Mans and Matau Howard, enemies of Sam Frisbee and Frank and Al Lykins were at the cemetery and began raising a disturbance. Frisbee’s friends protested. The Mans boys walked outside the graveyard and dared the Lykins boys to follow. Frisbee and some friends started with the Lykins boys for the hotel by another route when the Mans began shooting.

The Frisbees covered their retreat with revolvers and the Howard-Mans faction fired at them at long range. One or two spectators were slightly wounded and one of the Mans boys received a bullet in his shoulder. Frank Lykins was shot in the abdomen.

After reaching the house Frisbee and his friends stationed themselves at the windows and began firing rapidly at their enemies when the Howard-Mans faction retreated. An hour later they returned reinforced by several friends and riddled the hotel with bullets.

In the meantime Lykins and Frisbee had escaped to the mountains on horseback to alarm the neighborhood. Both sides are heavily armed. Frank Lykins will die and Kelley Mans is dangerously wounded. Both factions include men prominent in the   affairs of the county. The town has no protection excepting from the county officers who are powerless because of the standing of the participants in the battle. No arrests have been made, and each hour it is feared will bring on a renewal of the encounter.

Caney, Ky., Nov. 19.—Tuesday morning Gatan Howard and Bob and Kelley Mans, leaders of the Mans faction of the Lykins-Mans feud here, were arrested and furnished bonds in the sum of $1,000 each to appear before Judge Sanford Davis. Lykins may not recover.

The Winchester Sentinel, Wednesday, November 26, 1902

Lykins, Green The Winchester Sun   Fri., 8-24-1917
Lykins, James Rexford (Rex) The Winchester Sun   Mon., 6-7-2004
Lykins, Jeptha Walters The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-14-1924
Lykins, Larry The Winchester Sun   Tues., 12-4-1990
Lykins, Minnie Mae The Sun Sentinel Thur., 11-2-1911
Lykins, Mrs. Claude The Winchester Sun   Fri., 8-29-1919
Lykins, Mrs. Edna Reed The Winchester Sun   Sat., 2-22, 2-24-1969
Lykins, Mrs. Isabel The Winchester Sun   Mon., 10-25-1937
Lykins, Mrs. John The Winchester Sun   Thur., 4-25-1929
Lykins, Mrs. Lida Baker The Winchester Sun   Thur., 4-17, 4-18, 4-19-2003
Lykins, Mrs. Louise Noble The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-8-1926
Lykins, Mrs. Maggie Pelfrey The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-4-1974
Lykins, Mrs. Mary Logan The Winchester Sun   Sat., 12-3-2011
Lykins, Mrs. Neda Clay Stafford The Winchester Sun   Fri., 5-16, 5-17-1975
Lykins, Mrs. Nora Ellen The Winchester Sun   Fri., 8-8-1986
Lykins, Mrs. S. J. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 7-13-1921
Lykins, Mrs. Wilma Dean Rogers The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-19-2002
Lykins, Richard The Winchester Sun   Fri., 8-24-1917
Lykins, Shiloh The Winchester Sun   Wed., 6-6-1928
Lykins, Vaughn The Winchester Sun   Fri., 7-9, 7-10-1976
Lykins, Victor (Vic) The Winchester Sun   Thur., 4-7-1988
Lykins, W. R. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 5-9-1931
Lyle, Arthur M. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 3-11-2004
Lyle, Bernie Clay The Winchester Sun Wed., 6-10, 6-11-1981
Lyle, Bessie The Winchester Sun   Thur., 5-22-1924
Lyle, Billy Clay The Winchester Sun   Mon., 7-11-1994
Lyle, D. M. The Winchester Sun,   Tues., 5-31-1921
Lyle, Geo. Bush Montgomery – Died, of heart disease, Geo. Bush Lyle, aged 19 years.

The Winchester Democrat   Wednesday 1-30-1889

Lyle, George W. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 10-20-1948
Lyle, George W. Sr. As we go to press we learn of the death of G.W. Lyle, Sr., last night at his home at Furnace.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, May 17, 1910

 

A large number of people from this city attended the funeral of Geo. W. Lyle, Sr. at his late residence on Hardwick’s creek. There was a dinner on the ground and about 500 people present.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, August 9, 1910

Lyle, Harry Harlen The Winchester Sun   Tues., 7-30-1946
Lyle, Homer The Winchester Sun   Tues., 3-21-1978
Lyle, infant The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-7-1914
Lyle, J. G. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 2-10-1916
Lyle, James Kevin The Winchester Sun   Fri., 6-20-1997
Lyle, Jesse The Winchester Sun   Tues., 4-10-1979
Lyle, Jesse C. The Winchester Sun   Thur., 6-3-1971
Lyle, John Rev. John Lyle

Pioneer preacher, educator and author, prominent in the Annals of Kentucky

John Lyle was not only a pioneer preacher but also a preceptor and a publisher and was singularly successful in all. His immediate ancestors were scotchmen who, driven from home by religious persecution, settled first in the north of Ireland and later emigrated to America. More remotely the family seem to have been Norman and to have gone to England with William the conqueror. Instead of the usual “three brothers,” four Lyles came to America and, after perhaps a brief sojourn in Pennsylvania, found permanent homes in Timber Ridge, Rockbridge, now Augusta county, Va. Dr. William Henry Ruffner, who wrote “The Lyle Chapter in the History of Washington and Lee University,” says: “The immediate family of Lyles, now small in Rockbridge county, was one of the largest and best….The Lyle blood and influence became largely merged in other families. By marriage they became connected with the Alexanders, Stuarts, Grahams, McClungs, Reids, Paxtons, McDowells, Lacys, Ruffners, Montgomerys, Moffats, Donalds, Campbells and many others. “In 1749 August Academy was established. Elder John Lyle, the father of the subject of this sketch, was one of the first trustees of this Academy and here his three sons, John, Joel, Reid and William, were educated. The Academy was in 1782 chartered as Liberty Hall Academy which later Washington and Lee University. The Lyles were closely connected with this institution. Three of its trustees were Lyles, Elder John Lyle and his son William having served in succession during a period of fifty-nine years. Fifteen Lyles are mentioned among the Alumni. Thirty-two of Lyle lineage appear under other names. Bringing with him the best education the times afforded Rev. John Lyle came to Kentucky where all of his professional life was spent. Dr. William H. McGuffey, the author of the famous “Reader,” thus describes Mr. Lyle’s appearance: “He was of the most venerable and dignified-looking gentlemen I ever saw. Much above the ordinary stature, erect form, with an expanded chest and a remarkably fine head, surrounded by a profusion of hair, entirely white, and which he wore long, flowing down to his shoulders; with an elastic step and commanding mien, he could not be mistaken in any company or by the careless observer, for an ordinary man. “Being a thorough scholar, especially in the languages, he was intent on doing his utmost for the rising generation, both intellectually and morally. Hon. Chilton Allen, of Clark county, member of Congress from Kentucky, says: “As a teacher he was singularly devoted to the improvement of his pupils and had an admirable talent for communicating knowledge. I think that his labors in this way accomplished more than those of any other of the ministry. In the great revival meetings of the times he distinguished himself by the firm stand he took against the hysterical excitement which occurred at those meetings. His diaries of events during the years 1801 to 1805 inclusive, give vivid accounts of scenes in those great camp meetings and of events which caused the schisms which were the beginning of the new denominations known as Campbellites or “Christians” and Cumberland Presbyterians. He was not a voluminous writer. One of his sermons, written as he rode on horseback from church to church, was addressed to young ministers who were about to be licensed to preach by the Presbytery. The writer copied it for his great-great grandson and it covered ninety pages of sermon paper. He frequently mentions preaching for three hours to “attentive audiences.” His accounts of the part he took in debates with Barton W. Stone and others who differed from him in religious doctrine are singularly modest and he speaks no word of bitterness against those who opposed his views, yet it is a fact that his famous sermon on “Order” put a stop to the disorders which had disgraced the revivals. The culmination of the excitement concurred at Walnut Hill, Fayette county, and the sermon was preached in 1803 in the old stone church which still stands. These meetings were held at Lexington, Paris, Walnut Hill, Salem, Pisgah and other well known churches. Thousands of people were gathered together, many of them camping. Services were conducted in the morning, the afternoon and sometimes nearly all night. People seem to have “gotten religion” in the way we have ridiculed the negroes for doing. They wept, shouted, sang, danced, jerked, hugged each other, and fell down in spells which resemble hysteria, epilepsy, catalepsy or lunacy. Sometimes great masses of people shouted or prayed aloud for hours. The original diary still exists and is owned by the family at Danville, Ky. It is a very valuable contribution to the history of religion in our State.

LIZZIE A. LYLE – A great niece of Rev. John Lyle.                                                 (Extracts from diary of Rev. John Lyle)

1., Sab. Of June 1803. Supper administered at Walnut Hill. Ministers present, Messrs. Samuel Shannon, James Blythe, Jas. Howe, Isaac Tull, Samuel Rannals, Barton Stone, John Coyle, Robert Stuart, ordained ministers of West Covington Presbytery. Of Transylvania Presbytery, Messrs. Cameron, Finley, Houston, Kleland, S. Robinson, W. McPheeters, licentiate of Lexington P. Virginia, R. James Moore, President University. ….In the evening society held in the meeting house. Not long after it was introduced the affections of some were excited and others fell. Some talked, some sung, some prayed, and others exhorted in loud reiterated peals which made the arches of the sanctum ring. One Hawkins from Madison seemed happily engaged; his language was expressive of the overflowing of real piety. I left I think about eleven o’clock and went to Mr. Stuart’s Saturday morning the people assembled early. (Note – It rained Friday and Saturday, so that though there were wagons and tents the people had to resort to the house) and engaged in worship in promiscuous multitude, men and women of all ranks closely crowded together before the pulpit and conducted as described above whilst many others occupied the seats but could get no advantage owing to the loud peals of indistinct sound that issued from the busy crowd. Mr. McCleland, a Licentiate, began to preach….After him Mr. Finley preached. After sermon the people broke out in a loud bursts of prayer, hundreds using their voices at the same time. On the countenances of many there was much solemnity and it appeared that they prayed in the spirit though their understanding was unfruitful as to the edification of others. Many of the populace of all ranks stood and beheld this scene with apparent amazement. They continued the praying in this manner with a decrease of loudness at intervals for perhaps an hour or two hours but at the same time now and then parties singing through the meeting house. It must be acknowledged it was a solemn but at the same time a confused scene. Just at dusk I rose and claimed their attention, which with difficulty I obtained. I exhorted for a few minutes….After night the people crowded together in a close huddle and were engaged in salutation by shaking hands, some hugging, etc….Numbers of them were almost constantly employed in praying and exhorting with all their might when none scarcely could hear what they said. Many hollow till they are hoarse and debilitate their bodily constitutions when but few or perhaps none can hear them. Sam McL., of Woodford got afloat either Friday or Saturday evening, exhorted much….The people who could not join in this exercise from want either of room or of disposition or because of the great noise, sat for hours idle in their seats or walked about the meeting house….After the table service was over the people were dismissed and an appointment for afternoon sermon made, but numbers agonized, numbers singing and numbers praying together with a loud voice so that the evening was spent without any sermon at the tent. One thing of some importance was transacted which may be worth relating. A Miss D–, an orphan from Garrard county, on the forks of Dick’s river, was in an ecstasy of joy. Two men hoisted her on their shoulders, though she was a woman grown, in the manner that the victorious party of the vulgar hoist their representative at election. She exulted aloud crying, “Glory to God,” clapped her hands until they were all red and swollen, told the people she had lost father and mother but now she knew God was her father, and she talked I suppose near half an hour before they let her down. She then hugged Mr. Shannon and Finley, Mr. McD and another man that stood near. Put her arms about their necks and hugged and then clapped their backs. Though the hoisting of the girl might have been done with a good intention, yet it appeared impudent and in a certain degree and she seemed not to rejoice with trembling. Note – I do not think the scripture authorizes female exhortation. I think too much fuss and applause about those who get a manifestation engenders spiritual pride….Lyle’s Dale, Nov. 16, 1802. I have been reviewing the narrative of those who fell at Sugar Ridge last year in September. I find that there are but two or three of them who are now professors of good report. Twenty one fell in all; of the whole there are but three reputable professors; the rest are chiefly careless or do not make any profession.”

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, November 19, 1909

Lyle, John Settlement with James Lyle administrator of the estate John Lyle dec. returned approved and ordered to be approved.

Order Book 10; P. 239; July Court 1835

Lyle, John G. Paris – John G. Lyle, aged 50 years, known all over the states as John “Blow” Lyle, a well known turfman and bookmaker, died at his home on Second street, after a lingering illness of consumption. He was a well known figure at all the prominent racetracks, and in his earlier days was an enthusiastic baseball fan, being a member of the old Paris Mutual club, famous in its day as the champions of Central Kentucky.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, August 26, 1910

Lyle, John S. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-13-1987
Lyle, Joseph S. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 5-12-2004
Lyle, L. C. The Winchester Sun   Sat., 12-14-1935
Lyle, Mrs. Bettie Martin The Winchester Sun   St., 3-3-1928
Lyle, Mrs. Elizabeth Rupard The Winchester Sun   Thur., 9-13-1979
Lyle, Mrs. G. W. Sr. The funeral of the wife of G. W. Lyle, Sr. will be preached at the church at Vaughn’s Mill on the third Sunday in June.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, May 24, 1898

Lyle, Mrs. George Lilly The Winchester Sun   Fri., 12-10-1943
Lyle, Mrs. Hattie Elizabeth

Foreman

The Winchester Sun   Wed., 9-6-1939
Lyle, Mrs. Lilly Knox The Winchester Sun   Wed., 2-12, 2-13-1964
Lyle, Mrs. Margaret Died

Mrs. Margaret Lyle, wife of Joe Lyle, a prominent Fayette farmer, died Sunday.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Nov. 30, 1900

Lyle, Mrs. Mattie The Winchester Sun   Fri., 7-31, 8-1-2009
Lyle, O. A. Died

O. A. Lyle, County Attorney of Powell county and Democratic candidate to succeed himself, died at Stanton Sunday morning.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., Nov. 1, 1901

Lyle, Randall Bruce The Winchester Sun   Fri., 12-14-1990
Lyle, Samuel Halley (Lisle) DROWNED

SAD DEATH OF SAMUEL LYLE

A brief telegram from Louisville last night conveys the painful intelligence of the death of Samuel Lyle, son of Rufus Lyle, of this county. The dispatch stated that Mr. Lyle was upon a steamboat at Louisville, and fell overboard into the river. His body was not found at a late hour yesterday evening. His bereaved family will have the sympathy of the entire community in their affliction.

THE LEXINGTON DAILY PRESS     TUESDAY 12-14-1875

Lyle, Tavis The Winchester Sun   Wed., 9-1-1976
Lyle, Taylor The Winchester Sun   Sat., 11-14-1959
Lyle, Walter (Lisle) Age 1, male, he was born in Clark County, KY, his parents were Claiborne and Esther Lyle, both his parents were born in Clark County, KY, he died in Clark County, KY, June 1, 1861 of dyptheria

CCKD

Lyles, Charles Michael The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-29, 8-30-1988
Lyles, John The Winchester Sun   Thur., 6-10, 6-11-1971
Lyles, Mrs. John The Winchester Sun   Fri., 9-10-1948
Lyles, Otis The Winchester Sun   Tues., 8-3-1948
Lyman, A. J. (A. W.) The Winchester Sun   Fri., 9-18, 9-21-1914
Lyman, J. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-19-1934
Lyman, Jackie Lee The Winchester Sun Sat., 7-28-2007
Lyman, Jerry Wayne The Winchester Sun Sat., 1-13-2007
Lyman, Mrs. Esther Lucille

Lasater

The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-9-2001
Lynam, Omar W. (Slim) The Winchester Sun Tues., 2-10-1981
Lynch, Bertha The Winchester Sun   Fri., 7-16-1920
Lynch, Burnam Pryse The Winchester Sun   Wed., 4-22, 4-23-1964
Lynch, Clarence D. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 8-1-1962
Lynch, Dale Ladwig The Winchester Sun Fri., 12-18-1981
Lynch, Delbert Wayne The Winchester Sun   Sat., 3-29-1952
Lynch, Fleming G. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 7-20, 9-24-1936
Lynch, Jerome The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-16-1931
Lynch, John Thornton Sampson, who was sent to the penitentiary from Carter county for killing a man, and who was afterwards pardoned and ordered to leave the State, murdered John Lynch, a miner at Buchel Ohio, Thursday, in cold blood. A mob made an effort to hang him but the officers spirited him out of the place.

The Democrat, Friday, December 25, 1891.

Lynch, Michael Michael Lynch, of Lexington, fell out of a barn loft while drunk and broke his neck.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, May 24, 1893

Lynch, Mrs. Laura The Winchester Sun   Thur., 6-9, 6-10-1966
Lynch, Mrs. Lula Dingus The Winchester Sun   Thur., 10-4-1934
Lynch, Mrs. Minnie Lyle The Winchester Sun   Tues., 6-8, 6-9-1971
Lynch, Mrs. Opal The Winchester Sun   Mon., 3-10-2003
Lynch, Mrs. Pearl The Winchester Sun   Sat., 11-26-1983
Lynch, Mrs. Plynie Cantor The Winchester Sun   Tues., 12-22-1964
Lynch, Newton Charged with murder

Lexington, Ky., July 23 – Newton Lynch, who while disputing over the affections of Tilly Hoskins Tuesday night, was shot by Edward Boner, died Wednesday morning. Boner was charged with murder and will be tried Friday.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, July 24, 1896

Lynch, Patrick Joseph The Winchester Sun   Thur., 1-5, 1-6-1928
Lynch, R. C. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 5-13-1931
Lynch, Ralph The Winchester Sun Thur., 2-5-2009
Lynch, Vernon The Winchester Sun   Mon., 11-2, 11-3-1964
Lynch, Vernon Jr. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-12-1988
Lynch, Wanda L. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 1-5, 1-6-2005

Scobee Funeral Home Web Site Tues., 1-4-2005

Lyne, Mary Aged Woman Frozen To Death

Henderson, Ky., Feb. 10

Mary Lyne, an aged lady, was found frozen on Water street Thursday morning. It is supposed that she had started to a neighbor’s house during the night and had slipped down and was unable to regain her footing.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Feb. 14, 1899

Lyne, Mrs. Ann Hisle The Winchester Sun   Mon., 9-19-1960
Lyne, Mrs. Anna H. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 12-29-1913
Lyne, William THE late William Lyne, of Jessamine, had a way of protecting his meat that was very effectual.   At hog killing time he produced a paper of white powder and in the presence of the negroes he sprinkled a little of it on a piece of the meat and remarked that he did this to catch any thief that should be so foolish as to go into his smoke house after meat, strychnine was sure to get the scoundrel sooner or later, for he marked that piece so distinctly that he could not mistake it.” No thief ever went into Mr. Lynes smoke house.-Lexington Gazette.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, January 18, 1895.

Lyne, William Clarke The Winchester Sun   Wed., 2-7-1923
Lynn, Billy (aka Sammy Jones) The Winchester Sun   Thur., 5-10-1934
Lynn, Bryant Bryant Lynn, one of the Irish Lancers in Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show, died in his saddle from heart disease during a performance in New York.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, June 1, 1894

Lynn, Henry The Winchester Sun,   Mon., 5-2-1921
Lynn, James E. Twins die

In Lincoln county there were twin brothers, John G. and James E. Lynn. They were thrifty farmers and excellent citizens. For several years James E. has been an invalid, but John has always prophesied that he would die first. Thought in apparent good health, was taken ill about two weeks since and died on Nov. 28th. On the following day James, who had been so long an invalid died also. They were buried in the same grave. In life they seemed never so happy, as when in each others company, and in death they were not divided.

The Winchester Sun-Sentinel Thursday, December, 5, 1907

Lynn, John Accidentally Killed

Russell Dickerson accidentally shot and killed John Lynn, at Kinkade, a station on the Q. and C. Railroad, four miles South of Georgetown. Dickerson had an old pistol and fired it up the railroad track to see if it would work. It was dark, and he saw no one, but Linn was walking up the track on his way home, and the ball struck him in the back of the head, killing him instantly.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Sept. 2, 1902

Lynn, John G. Twins die

In Lincoln county there were twin brothers, John G. and James E. Lynn. They were thrifty farmers and excellent citizens. For several years James E. has been an invalid, but John has always prophesied that he would die first. Thought in apparent good health, was taken ill about two weeks since and died on Nov. 28th. On the following day James, who had been so long an invalid died also. They were buried in the same grave. In life they seemed never so happy, as when in each others company, and in death they were not divided.

The Winchester Sun-Sentinel Thursday, December, 5, 1907

Lynn, John G. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 10-7-1938
Lynn, Mrs. Margaret The Winchester Sun   Thur., 10-4-1979
Lynn, Sterling The Winchester Sun   Tues., 7-9-1935
Lyon, Daniel The Winchester Sun   Tues., 7-27-1920
Lyon, David The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-16, 4-17-1956
Lyon, Frank A. Jr. Beattyville – Frank A. Lyon, Jr., mayor of Beattyville and master commissioner of the Lee circuit court, died of heart disease with which he had been afflicted for some time. He was about 30 years of age and one of the most promising young lawyers at the Beattyville bar. He graduated from Central university at Danville about five years ago.

The Winchester Democrat   Tuesday, September 27, 1910

Lyon, Howard The Winchester Sun   Tues., 3-30, 3-31-1954
Lyon, John THE WAR OF 1812 – Private

The Roll of Two Companies Raised in Clark County by Capt. James Sympson.

Company of Mounted Kentucky Volunteers under the Command of Capt. James Sympson. Left Winchester September 15th, 1814, and arrived at Urbana, Ohio on the 20th.

The Semi-Weekly Sun     Fri., 2-21-1879

Lyon, Mrs. Billie Holliday

Harkins

The Winchester Sun   Fri., 5-10, 5-11-2002
Lyon, Mrs. Elijah Died-On the 4th inst., at the residence of her son-in-law, Abner Baxter, Mrs. Elijah Lyon, aged 84 years. Her funeral was preached by Rev. G. C. Kelly and her remains were interred in the cemetery at this place. The deceased was one of the oldest residents of our town, but her aged husband survives her.

Clark County Democrat     Wed., 9-8-1880

Lyon, Mrs. Lula Williams The Winchester Sun   Sat., 12-10 12-12-1938
Lyon, Mrs. Mary Harden The Winchester Sun   Wed., 3-16-1938
Lyon, Mrs. Sadie Hodgkin The Winchester Sun   Tues., 1-5, 1-6-1965
Lyon, Mrs. T. C. The Winchester Sun   Fri., 3-16, 3-17-1928
Lyon, Russell The Winchester Sun   Thur., 12-17-1959
Lyon, Sam The Winchester Sun   Mon., 7-30, 7-31-1923
Lyon, Stephen The Winchester Sun   Wed., 4-19-1916
Lyon, Thomas Cleghorne The Winchester Sun   Thur., 2-4, 2-6-1932
Lyon, Walter While out hunting near Henderson, Ky., Walter Lyon shot at a flock of ducks. His gun exploded, hurling the cap into his brain and causing instant death.

The Winchester Democrat, Wednesday, November 29, 1893

Lyon, Walter Thomas The Winchester Sun   Wed., 1-24, 1-26-1923
Lyons, Alma A Fatal Accident

Monday, little Alma Lyons, the three-year-old daughter of H. K. Lyon, of Mt. Sterling, caught fire and was so badly burned that she died the following day. The accident happened at Stepstone where the little one was staying since the death of her mother not long ago. The latter was a daughter of John W. Adams, of this city, and the remains of little Alma were brought here for interment. Funeral services were held at the grave by Eld. Keene.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, Nov. 30, 1894

Lyons, Charles The Winchester Sun   Thur., 4-1-1915
Lyons, Charles Rayburn The Winchester Sun   Wed., 9-6-1961
Lyons, Fred The Winchester Sun   Thur., 9-24-1925
Lyons, Fred The Winchester Sun   Wed., 11-7, 12-27-1928
Lyons, Fred The Winchester Sun   Tues., 2-26, 3-5, 6-4, 6-5-1929
Lyons, Geneiva The Winchester Sun   Thur., 9-24-1925
Lyons, George The Winchester Sun     Mon., 12-18-1933
Lyons, H. K. Died-At her home in Mt. Sterling. Friday night, of puerperal fever, Mrs. Ella Lyons, wife of H. K. Lyons, aged twenty-seven years. She leaves a husband and two little children, a daughter two years old and a son aged six weeks. She was a daughter of John W. Adams, of this city, and the remains were brought here for burial. The funeral was preached at the First Christian church Sunday afternoon by Elder Deene, and the body was interred in the cemetery, here where she was born and raised. She was quite popular and her many friends sympathize deeply with her sorrowing family.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, October 2, 1894.

 

A Fatal Accident

Monday, little Alma Lyons, the three-year-old daughter of H. K. Lyon, of Mt. Sterling, caught fire and was so badly burned that she died the following day. The accident happened at Stepstone where the little one was staying since the death of her mother not long ago. The latter was a daughter of John W. Adams, of this city, and the remains of little Alma were brought here for interment. Funeral services were held at the grave by Eld. Keene.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, Nov. 30, 1894

 

Died—At Mt. Sterling Sunday, infant son of H. K. Lyons, aged two and one-half months. The remains were brought here yesterday for interment . About the first of October Mrs. Lyons, who was a daughter of John W. Adams, of this city, died and was buried here. About two weeks ago Alma, a four year old daughter was burned to death and now his last child is dead.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, December 11, 1894

 

DIED-The hand of Death has again been laid upon the family of Squire John W. Adams. Thursday night his daughter, Miss Clara Belle Adams died aged 21 years, after an illness of eight weeks of typhoid fever. Her funeral was preached Saturday at the Christian church by Eld. Keene and the remains were interred in the cemetery.   She was a most amiable young woman and greatly beloved. This makes the fourth funeral in this family since late in September; at that time his daughter, Mrs. F. K. Lyons, died. She was followed in quick succession by her two children, one of whom was burned to death. Mrs. Sallie Hogan and Mrs. Irene Waldon are the only daughters left. Our sympathy goes out to the stricken family.

The Winchester Democrat, January 22, 1895.

Lyons, H. K. The Winchester Sun   Mon., 4-6-1936
Lyons, Harry The Winchester Sun   Thur., 9-24-1925
Lyons, infant son Died—At Mt. Sterling Sunday, infant son of H. K. Lyons, aged two and one-half months. The remains were brought here yesterday for interment . About the first of October Mrs. Lyons, who was a daughter of John W. Adams, of this city, died and was buried here. About two weeks ago Alma, a four year old daughter was burned to death and now his last child is dead.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, December 11, 1894

Lyons, Ira The Winchester Sun   Fri., 12-6 –1929
Lyons, J. J. Predicted His Death

Owensboro, Ky., Nov. 15

J. J. Lyons died at his home in Pellville, Hancock county, it being the 70th anniversary of his birth. For 15 years Mr. Lyons had been predicting that he would die at the age of 70.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Nov. 20, 1900

Lyons, James The Winchester Sun   Wed., 11-26-1913
Lyons, Joseph Killing In Morgan

Bernard Lewis, of Elliott county, shot and killed Joseph Lyons, of Carter county, in the stave woods near Yocum, Morgan county, Friday. Lewis made his escape.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., May 15, 1900

 

Goes Up For Life

Bernard Lewis, who murdered Joe Lyons in Morgan county, last July was found guilty Wednesday at West Liberty and his punishment was fixed at life imprisonment.

The Winchester Democrat   Fri., March 29, 1901

Lyons, Juanita The Winchester Sun   Thur., 9-24-1925
Lyons, Luke The Winchester Sun   Fri., 8-28-1931
Lyons, Matt Found dead on the street

At Cynthiana, Tuesday, the body of Matt Lyons, unmarried, aged forty, was found dead on one of the principal streets of the town. The coroner’s verdict was that his death was caused from exposure.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, January 10, 1896

Lyons, mother The Winchester Sun   Wed., 1-11-1928
Lyons, Mr. _______ Will Lyons was called to Ashland by the death of his brother.

The Winchester Democrat   Friday, August 26, 1910

Lyons, Mrs. Anna May The Winchester Sun   Tues., 4-13-1926
Lyons, Mrs. Bertha Belle Ritchey The Winchester Sun   Wed., 1-29-1986
Lyons, Mrs. Ella Died-At her home in Mt. Sterling. Friday night, of puerperal fever, Mrs. Ella Lyons, wife of H. K. Lyons, aged twenty-seven years. She leaves a husband and two little children, a daughter two years old and a son aged six weeks. She was a daughter of John W. Adams, of this city, and the remains were brought here for burial. The funeral was preached at the First Christian church Sunday afternoon by Elder Deene, and the body was interred in the cemetery, here where she was born and raised. She was quite popular and her many friends sympathize deeply with her sorrowing family.

The Winchester Democrat, Tuesday, October 2, 1894.

Lyons, Mrs. Myrtle The Winchester Sun   Fri., 10-2-1931
Lyons, Mrs. Opal Perry The Winchester Sun   Tues., 1-27-1953
Lyons, R. L. Sent to the Asylum.

R. L. Lyons, who was arrested in this city Sunday and taken to Lexington on the charge of embezzlement from an installment house of that city, was tried in court there Wednesday. He was adjudged by the jury as being of unsound mind, not responsible for his actions and was committed to the asylum. Two years ago he was committed to the asylum at Anchorage, but never discharged as cured. It is claimed that he was suffering from one of the spells of mania at the time he committed the offense with which he is charged.

The Winchester Democrat, Friday, July 18, 1902

Lyons, Raymond The Winchester Sun   Thur., 3-9-1978
Lyons, Sam The Winchester Sun   Thur., 7-24-1924
Lyons, Stanley Overheard The Plot

The Knowledge Od An Alleged Murder Is Said To Have Caused A Barkeeper To Commit Suicide

Louisville, Ky., Dec. 6

J. O. Lyons of this city, is in Paducah to investigate a rumor with regard to the death of his cousin Stanley Lyons, aged 22, of this city, who was found dead in the New Richmond hotel at Paducah three years ago. Lyons had committed suicide, but according to a story Mr. Lyons had heard he was murdered for some money he had won at gambling, and his body and the pistol were arranged to make it seem suicide.

The story has it that Charley Sexton, a barkeeper, overheard the plot, and that his knowledge so weighed on him after the young man’s death that he killed himself a short time ago.

The Winchester Democrat   Tue., Dec. 10, 1901

Lyons, William Sr. The Winchester Sun   Wed., 11-11-1970
Lyons, Williams M. Williams M. Lyons, custodian of the State buildings, died after an illness of two weeks of rheumatism.   He had been an invalid since being striken with paralysis in 1905, but was able to attend to his duties. The deceased was born in Frankfort 62 years ago.   He served as doorkeeper of the house of representatives during the notable Goebel contest.

The Winchester Democrat   Tues. 12-15-1908

Lysle, Cynthia Age 5, female, her parents were J. & N. Lysle, she died in December 1852.

CCKD

Lysle, John Ordered that Thomas C. Green, Lewis Grisby, and William Blaydes settle and adjust all accounts with James Lysle as administrator of the estate of Wyatt Bush decd. also to settle with said Lysle the guardian of John Lysle decd. and former guardian to the infant heirs of said Wyatt Bush decd. and make report.

Order Book 10 P. 20 January 1831

Lysle, Ora Mr. Ora Lysle Dies

Mr. Ora Lysle died at this home on Denny Avenue, Friday. Funeral services will be held Tuesday at 2 p.m. at the Broadway Baptist church. Rev. James Romes will officiate. Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Rosa Lysle, on daughter, Mrs. Grace Owens, two sons, Melvin and Clarence Lysle, a son-in-law, Elwood Owens, two brothers, Jess Lysle and Jay Lysle and several nephews and nieces.

THE WINCHESTER SUN. SAT. 7/2/1955

Lytle, Faye Wakeland The Winchester Sun   Mon., 8-6, 8-7-1979
Lytle, Gilbert Ray The Winchester Sun   Tues., 3-24, 3-25-1992
Lytle, Gilbert Scudder II The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-14, 2-15-1977
Lytle, John Baldwin The Winchester Sun   Fri., 9-20, 9-21-2002
Lyttle, Alexander The Winchester Sun   Wed., 3-28-1923
Lyttle, James A. Garfield The Winchester Sun   Tues., 9-17-1946
Lyttle, Mrs. Fanny The Sun Sentinel Thur., 7-6-1911
Lytton, Mrs. Mary Letitia Betts The Winchester Sun   Fri., 11-26-1999
Lyvers, Lizzie                       AA The Winchester Sun   Thur., 3-1-1928
Lyves, Lizzie The Winchester Sun   Mon., 2-29-1932

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